Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay

Sylwadau a dderbyniwyd ynghylch Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay

Mae’r rhestr isod yn cynnwys pawb a gofrestrodd i gyflwyno eu hachos ynghylch Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay a’u sylwadau perthnasol. Cyhoeddwyd y sylwadau yn yr iaith y cawsant eu cyflwyno ynddi’n wreiddiol.

FfynhonnellSylw – cliciwch ar unrhyw eitem i weld rhagor o fanylion
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Anthony Dean Trick
"Absolutely fantastic idea , as a member of the local community , I really hope this goes ahead "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Chris Binnie
"Tidal range energy is an important energy source in the Bristol Channel but is subject to environmental constraints."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Dr Lewis Keil
"Section 4.7.3.4 of the Environmental Impact Assessment included the statement that "Under normal operating conditions the discharge from the WwTW is UV disinfected and therefore would be expected to be barely detectable in the marine environment". UV disinfection reduces bacterial levels in the discharge by a factor of some 1000, but this does not leave "barely detectable levels of bacteria". I have concerns over the health impacts that might ensue from promoting water sports in a body of water that encloses the final effluent and storm sewage discharges from the WwTW. I am a retired chemist and have a detailed understanding of the issues involved as I was a key negotiator (For DCWW) in the consenting process when the WwTW was built "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Helena Sykes
"I am a resident of Swansea. I am supportive of the tidal lagoon being built. The large tidal range we have in Swansea is an excellent source of renewable energy. The number of homes that can be supplied is a huge step on the way to making the Swansea Bay area self sufficient for its energy needs. In turn this contributes to national energy security by reducing dependency on imported energy. The jobs created are a huge bonus for any area, especially in the current economic climate. It is good to see there will be lasting jobs which would be more likely to go to local people. I am also supportive of the visitor centre and sports facilities included in the proposal. I have worked in education in the Swansea area and the visitor centre would be an excellent place to take groups of young people to learn about renewable energy and the contribution their city is making. I also regualrly run on the coastal path in Swansea, but I don't use the east Swansea stretch much as it is uninteresting and there is nowhere to get tap water. Having the new visitor facilities there would be a great asset and the tidal lagoon would be much more pleasant than the stretch of coastal path that runs along Fabain Way now."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Martin Woodrow
"I simply think this is a very good project that will enhance the region as well as providing power and jobs."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Royal Yachting Association
"The RYA took part in the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon Hazard Workshop held on Tuesday 30th April 2013 and made a number of comments in respect of the resultant Hazard Log. Broadly we are content with the mitigation measures suggested in the hazard log, many of which have been taken on board from discussions at the workshop. We would still however be keen to see more information about a few of the risk reduction measures suggested in the log. Our Main concerns arise from: • The potential for siltation in the lagoon and in navigation channels – with respect to affecting water depth inside and outside the lagoon. This may well have an impact on the viability of recreational sailing within the lagoon. • Understanding of currents at different depths – with respect to people/vessels drifting towards turbines. • Wave reflection from the lagoon seawall affecting vessel navigation from the River Neath and River Tawe during certain weather conditions. In respect to the lagoon boundary, the RYA has a preference for an overlapping layout (option D shown in the PEIR at table 3.1) with the turbine housing sited in between. The RYA still takes the view that the final described presented in the ES is less safe. We accept that a number of mitigation measures are proposed in the ES, but passive measures might not always work, particularly for small craft. A 400m operational safety zone will require proactive management if it is to be effective. Furthermore, we are concerned that such a zone will force boats navigating from the River Neath to the River Tawe (or vice versa) to take an unnatural path should they choose to skirt the edge of the lagoon wall. Finally, The RYA has set its position on tidal energy developments out in a paper that has been made available to the risk consultant and the applicant. "
Ymgyngoreion Statudol Eraill
Welsh Government
"Please follow the link below to view this representation. If the link does not open automatically copy and paste into your browser. http://infrastructure.planningportal.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Welsh-Government-relevant-representation.pdf"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Andrew Allen
"Enviromental issues relating to sand and coastal errosion"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
David Williams
"would like the tidal lagoon to extend the whole arc of the bay as far as mumbles head/pier and incorporate enough extra beach front to restore the mumbles railway from the swansea museum location to mumbles pier with loops and passing points and a few boarding platforms en route with passenger shelters The object would be that the revenue generated would finance the restoration of the mumbes railway and provide a safe haven against storm surges of the future"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
EFT Energy Consultants Ltd
"As the owner of a number of Swansea based businesses and having always had the the interests of the local area and community at heart we wish to support the application on a number of fronts:- The positive effect of this development of Swansea and the locale on a worldwide platform. The positive effect both in the short and long term on the Welsh and British employment position. The positive effect on the local and Countrywide economy. The positive effect on low impact sustainable energy production with positive other area improvements in tourism and agriculture. The massive potential for a growing Welsh economy based on the developers ethos to drive the provision of local manufacturing. The projects understanding and want to undertake things in a proper and achievable manner to the benefit of all consulted parties. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Michael Eames
"Works and completion will have a detrimental affect on marine life throughout the area and sand drifting will cause problems to many areas which will cause erosion and unforeseen destruction of the natural landscape."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Paul Gibson
"is this being built by a limited company and what steps will be taken to guarantee the safe keeping/use of any supplied/invested sums of money ? and due dilligence of the people involved in this project."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Professor Roger A. Falconer
"I have a particular interest in the hydrodynamic, morphological and water quality processes predicted by the modelling of the design for this scheme. I also have an interest in the turbines being used, their power production potential and their impact on the hydrodynamics in Swansea Bay. Any points that I may make will relate to these topics. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Terrence Edward Logan
"concerns on the impact of the project on the environment in Swansea bay"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Colin Small
"I rent property in the affected area and Am the chief operating officer of a company that will relocate to this area in the next 15 months. I strongly support this sort of development as it addresses many needs. At this stage it seems to be an acceptable solution to some of our energy needs ( all be it with some concerns over the environmental impact), however the is a lot of detail that needs to be examined particularly around the cost/ benefit analysis that is not yet visible."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Steve Bell
"Resident of Swansea interested in the detail of this proposal. I am broadly in favour of this application."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
The Neath and Dulais Angling Club
"The 'Neath and Dulais Angling Club' (Membership - 225) is an Interested Party in the plan to create a Tidal Lagoon in close proximity to the estuary of the River Neath (Afon Nedd) which is a migratory river for both Salmon and Sewin (sea trout). We are a club with ## members. We own and control fishing rights on about ## miles of the River Neath. Fishing is available to the public at a reasonable cost and provides an important recreational amenity. The River Neath is a salmon and sea trout river with the migratory fish spending the juvenile part of their life in freshwater, before migrating through the estuary to the sea. On reaching adulthood they return to spawn in the river as large valuable fish. When the juvenile fish exit the river as smolts and return to spawn as adults they have to navigate their route through Swansea Bay with the added danger that the proposed lagoon and turbines will present. As a Club we are concerned that the proposed lagoon will harm these migratory fish and have a detrimental effect on the value of our fishery. There is a likelihood that the introduction of the lagoon and the turbines will change the flows that occur in Swansea Bay: • massive, unnatural flows in Swansea Bay interfering with normal migration routes and behaviour; • fish (smolts, returning adults and kelts) being drawn into the turbines and killed; • fish being drawn through the turbines into the impoundment and trapped; • fish being driven away from the area by unfavourable conditions; • other miscellaneous effects. An independent expert fisheries analysis commissioned by local clubs and others supports our view that the developer’s environmental impact assessment is flawed and understates the likely harm to salmon and sea trout: • their turbine encounter modelling uses incorrect assumptions for fish movements in Swansea Bay, over-optimistic assumptions for the proposed acoustic fish deterrent scheme and fails to allow for important factors such as river flows; • their turbine mortality modelling uses incorrect fish sizes, fails to estimate population effects (lifetime egg deposition effects) and fails to allow for indirect mortality from post-passage predation, etc; • they fail to acknowledge the effect on fish from rivers further afield; • the assessment fails to set out a worst case for the effects on fish. The application mentions a possibility of re-siting the turbine array because of unfavourable sea bed conditions. This would invalidate the modelling and require re-assessment. The Water Framework Directive assessment is flawed because it fails to take account of the likely damaging effect on Tawe waterbodies which are below Good Ecological Status because of fish and must therefore be improved before 2027. The developer has failed to consult us properly (in accordance with its own consultation strategy). We have had no discussions about monitoring, mitigation or compensation arrangements, as required. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Visit Wales/Welsh Government
"'Event Wales' the Welsh Government Major Events Strategy 2010-2020 states at 4.1 that we will "make effective and efficient use of Wales' resources, including built facilities and our outstanding natural environment." The proposed development in Swansea, if realised, would create a significant new events facility/arena for Wales. If one draws a parallel with the development of the Cardiff Bay Barrage and lagoon, this has contributed significantly to the development of home grown major events such as the Cardiff Half Marathon and formed the basis for attracting international events such as the Extreme Sailing Series. If the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon project proceeds, the Welsh Government Major Events Unit will work with local and regional partners and stakeholders to assess in more detail what events related programming can be developed and pursued to realise the events hosting potential of the facility and location. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Hugh Montgomery
"I write as a UK citizen and parent. I also write as a Professor of Medicine, with a substantial interest in the health implications of climate change, and in the impacts of generating capacity on health. Several facts will be recognised by all: a) the need to massively and rapidly reduce greenhouse gas emissions b) The need for UK energy security, and for increased generating capacity. Whilst one can debate which of the 'non-combustion' generating options (nuclear, or type of 'renewable) might be best (and all have disadvantages), we no longer have time to procrastinate. we must act. In this light, the Swansea Bay offering seems important. yes- it will have environmental downsides. But the downside of inactivity is great and certain. There are also likely 'upsides': employment will be offered, and a 'blue gym' space of usable water created, to the benefit of residence through availability of recreational space. The harm done to health by climate change and directly through fossil fuel use (e.g particulates) is avoided, and co-benefits to health accrued- all while increasing generating capacity, and helping assure energy security. For all of these reasons- but mainly from the health standpoint-, I strongly support this proposal."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
The Bristol Port Company
"The Bristol Port Company is one of the UK’s major ports and the largest general cargo Port on the Bristol Channel and Severn Estuary. Annual turnover approaches £80 million and we deal with in excess of 12 million tonnes of cargo each year. Privately owned since 1991, we are an exemplar of a successful business enterprise and over 7,500 local jobs are dependent upon the Port. The Bristol Port Company is the competent harbour authority for the Severn Estuary between Flat Holm and Steep Holm, the Severn Crossing and the River Avon as far upstream as the Cumberland Basin. We have a conservancy role in addition to our responsibilities for navigation, dredging, safety and enforcement. As a commercial Port we are reliant upon the ability to bring vessels safely to and from the Port without delay and we will seek to protect that capability. We are a key stakeholder in any proposals that might affect our role as a harbour authority and commercial port and we therefore have an interest in any significant proposals. This is particularly the case when examining the cumulative impacts of multiple potential schemes in the Bristol Channel and Severn Estuary. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Geraint Davies MP on behalf of Geraint Davies MP
"The Member of Parliament for Swansea West would like to make some points in relation to the application, this is concerning; Environmental Impact Tourist Impact "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Philippa Powell
"This representation is being made with reference to the very significant landscape and visual impacts presented by the proposed scheme. The landscape and visual impact is by far the greatest impact posed by the proposed scheme, which will be seen around the entire Swansea Bay area and hinterland, including from Aberavon all the way around Swansea Bay promenade to Mumbles Head. Swansea Bay in its current state is enjoyed as a scenic and beautiful accessible location not only by residents in Swansea, but also by day trippers and longer staying tourists from across the UK and beyond. The beautiful natural resource of Swansea Bay is the symbol of Swansea. The proposed scheme is a permament impact on the landscape. I do not believe that the DCO application made by the applicant has satisfactorially addressed the impact to the landscape and primary and secondary impacts to the public's enjoyment of Swansea Bay as a beautiful and natural resource. There is no way of compensating for the loss of this landscape and view. Equally, I do not believe that the speculative enhanced recreational opportunities suggested by the applicant actually exist, and I wish to see further information on what kinds of recreation (jet ski's?) and associated revenue have been modelled by the applicant. I also wish to see publicly, what public stakeholder liaison has taken place. As I have already stated, Swansea Bay is utilised by people not only residing in the Bay area but from further afield often on a daily basis. When I speak to people who live in Swansea, there is no awareness of this proposed scheme. I wish to understand further how this application has been publicised, since to date it would appear to have been very much under the radar of the local population. I would also wish to see and question information with regards to impacts of the proposed scheme to the aggregates and dredging industry, changes to coastal processes and scouring of sediments within Swansea Bay, potential of release of contaminated sediments as a secondary result of scour, impacts to the local fishing industry (including lugworm, cockles, flatfish fishers) as well as imapcts to the existing recreation resources of sailing and rowing. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Jeremy Leggett
"In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, the UK government is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80% below 1990 levels by 2050, under the Climate Change Act 2008. It is also committed to producing 15% of the UK’s energy from renewable sources, under the Promotion and use of energy from renewable sources Directive 2008. The need to mitigate the effects of climate change when considering whether to grant consent for renewable energy infrastructure is stated in Paragraph 2.2.8 of National Policy Statement EN-1: “To avoid the most dangerous impacts of climate change, the increase in average global temperatures must be kept to no more than 2°C, and that means global emissions must start falling as a matter of urgency” Further to this, there is an urgent need for new energy generating capacity to meet the projected increase in demand for energy, and mitigate against the loss of 6GW of coal generation plant capacity, which comes as a result of the implementation of the Large Combustion Plant Directive 2001, and latterly the Industrial Emissions Directive. This urgent need is enshrined in the Overarching National Policy Statement for Energy (EN-1), which states that “The [decision maker] should therefore assess all applications for development consent […] on the basis that the Government has demonstrated that there is a need for those types of infrastructure”. TLSB will produce 9% of Wales’ domestic energy needs, equivalent to more than 120,000 homes. TLSB will also provide carbon savings in excess of 236,000 tonnes per year. The project, therefore, will make a significant contribution to mitigating against the impacts of the loss of generation capacity due to the implementation of the Industrial Emissions Directive, while also fulfilling the target to produce 15% of energy from renewable sources in order to reduce emissions and the effects of climate change. Furthermore, as the first of potential network of lagoons that could provide up to 10GW of reliable, renewable generating capacity, TLSB is an essential first step in realising the significant environmental and economic benefits of a lagoon industry in Britain. There is no alternative to the opportunities presented by Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay. Other forms of tidal stream technologies are relatively undeveloped and do not yet have the potential generating capacity of a tidal lagoon. The potential use of barrages has been extensively assessed by the UK Government, and to date it has been determined that their environmental impact and cost do not offer a viable solution. Offshore and onshore wind and solar technologies offer essential generating capacity, but capacity that is tied to immediate weather conditions. Table 9.1 of the Planning Statement provides a comparison of these technologies with the generating potential of Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay, demonstrating that the Project offers a generating potential much greater than comparable renewable technologies. Tidal lagoons use existing technology in an innovative way to harness predictable, reliable, renewable energy, as part of a facility that provides a net environmental and social benefit to the people and ecology of Swansea Bay. In this way, the benefits of this scheme far outweigh its limited environmental impact. On this basis, the Examining Authority should recommend that development consent be granted. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Village Hotel
"I am making a representation on behalf of the Village Hotel in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. Village Hotel is a large business based in the SA1 area of Swansea. We employ 150 people and are proud to be located in the central Swansea and Swansea Docks area. We are a resort hotel with a leisure club, restaurants, bedroom and meeting space based in SA1. We believe the TLSB proposal will provide the following benefits to our business and the Bay area: Swansea is an excellent destination for tourism in Wales, dependent on the type of jobs that will be created during the construction and operation of the Bay. For Village, more people in jobs means more people who are able to buy goods and services around the Bay, which will in turn increase the demand for our business. Based on our business projectionsand the conclusions of Chapter 22 of the ES, we believe that we will create new jobs as a result of the extra demand created by the proposal. The proposal will bring people from all over the world to view the Lagoon. We believe that our business will benefit from the increase of tourism to the area and hope that we will attract visitors from further afield than the UK. Based on The Cardiff Business School report presented in appendix x of the ES and our projections in the event of an increase in inward investment to the Bay, we believe we could increase our Budget forecast by 10% as a result of the proposal. TLSBs commitment to ensuring a local supply chain is explained in Chapter 22 of the ES. We concur with the evidence in this Chapter and our projections show that this could increase demand for our hotel if the proposal is given consent. In conclusion, we believe that the Village hotel will benefit from this proposal because of the expected increase in demand for accommodation at the building stages and thereafter. We draw this conclusion as a result of the evidence we have read in the ES. Further to this, we believe that not only the Village hotel will benefit and that the benefits of the development outweigh any environmental impacts the project may have on the Bay. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Wheelrights
"Wheelrights, the Swansea Bay Cycle Campaign Group, generally support this project because of its potential to improve provision for cyclists in the area, both for those who use their bikes for transportation, eg to commute, and for recreation. Our support can be summarised as follows: 1. The construction of an access road, which we understand will incorporate a cycle path, from opposite the Fabian Way Park and Ride to the NE end of the lagoon will provide part of a direct cycle route between Swansea and the Bay Campus. This route would follow Langdon Road (currently not a through road) to join the west end of the access road which would continue it to the Bay Campus. 2. We welcome the proposed cycle route round the lagoon both for recreational cyclists and for those who use a bike to visit the facilities to be provided there. 3. As there is a strong environmental element in our mission we support the project in that it will provide electricity from a sustainable source."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
William Howard John
"I strongly support this appliaction as I co sider it the correct means of gaining power from the natural environment with the minimum of long term disturbance and damage. The tidal pettern and flow at this site is unique and should be exploited to the full."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Aberavon RFC
"I am making this representation on behalf of Aberavon RFC, Aberavon RFC is a semi professional rugby side based in Port Talbot close to the proposed Tidal Lagoon project and we play in the Welsh Principality Premiership, Swalec Cup and the British & Irish Cup. Our players are semi professional and we also run schools rugby and netball programme in the schools across Port Talbot to children aged 7-11, the club plays a vital role to the community and a number of the community’s social life’s by providing a sporting hobbie for people to support. We believe the TLSB proposal will provide jobs to the local community as well as trade and supply opportunities for local businesses as well as bring in tourism to our area that may come and watch our side play rugby. Job Opportunities: There is a lack of jobs in Port Talbot which has an impact on family life and their wellbeing; with the construction of TLSB it will give thousands of people an opportunity to gain employment through a number of opportunities at the site as well as through contracting and construction. Increase of tourism With the TLSB being built in our area it will increase tourism to our town as well as this we will be able to promote our fixtures and club to the people visiting the area, this will increase the clubs revenue and profile. Port Talbot will also gain shoppers increasing in more money being spent in the town which can only be good for us as well and local businesses looking to advertise with the rugby side. Aberavon RFC would also work closely with TLSB in relation to our schools programme on educating the children on the different stages of the project from construction to completion and TLSB would support our programme with visits to the schools and encourage children to take part in both rugby and netball Conclusion; In conclusion, we believe that Aberavon RFC will benefit from this proposal because of the expected increase in revenue for our club as well as employment for local people and TLSB working with us on our schools programme for the younger generation. Further to this, we believe that the benefits of the TLSB development outweigh any negative impacts the project may have on the Bay. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
British Hydropower Association
"Tidal power provides predictable and secure generation capacity. Research into a number of tidal range technologies and offshore hydropower is proceeding at a number of sites around the British Isles and will continue to be an increasingly important aspect of the renewable energy 'mix' The massive potential carbon reduction savings and increased electricity generation, not to mention job creation, increased local economic activity and infrastructure improvements, that can arise as a result of developing such schemes cannot be underestimated. The British Hydropower Association supports and encourages the development of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay scheme and other similar schemes throughout the UK."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Russell Bailey Gilbert
"I have a professional interest in renewable energy, having gained an M.Sc. in the subject from Loughborough University. My current work (for a charity) is primarily concerned with solar PV energy, but tidal power, from lagoons or tidal currents was the most interesting and promising topic covered on my course. The environmental impact of the lagoon will be negligible in comparison with the impact of the fossil-fuel combustion that it will replace. I am aware of the high costs of the Swansea Lagoon project, but am firmly convinced that for future projects the costs will be significantly reduced. It is apparent from the cost reductions achieved in solar PV energy over the last ten years that the efficiency and effectiveness of new technologies can be dramatically improved once industrial-scale development resources are applied. This is what is happening in the tidal energy sector. I strongly support this application."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Timothy Kingham
"That tidal power generation needs to be given greater attention and support in order to meet European and National targets for renewable energy and carbon emissions reductions. I am a civil engineer and fully aware of the opportunities and benefits of tidal power generation. I studied and visited the French tidal power project at La Rance nr St Malo as a student in the 1960s - an excellent example of the technology and a project that will continue to provide essentially free energy for decades more. This country has so far failed to follow the French lead to our cost, and our Government needs urgently to give the Swansea Bay project its total commitment in supporting this infrastructure development application and setting a fair rate for the energy feed in tariff, given the relatively high project development risks."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Andrew Burns
"I am a teacher at St. Thomas Community Primary School Swansea and have seen first hand the educational and social benefits that are linked to the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay. We have been involved in the early stages of the project and used it as a vehicle to teacher children about the advantages and disadvantages of sustainable power. It has given the children a greater understanding of the environmental impact that energy production has on the planet and ways of creating green energy. We have carried out discussion and debates, created and analysed questionnaires and developed the children's numeracy and literacy skills in a variety of ways. The Tidal Lagoon team have helped us to explain these issues in a situation that directly impact on the children's local environment and have provided resources and information for us to use. The proposed visitor and education centre, which is to be located on the tidal lagoon, will be a fantastic local resource which will surely attract tourists, locals and schools to the area, resulting in a positive knock on effect for the local economy. It is great to see that that Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay are now working with WJEC to plan education resources for the Welsh Baccalaureate and are developing lesson plans and materials for Key Stage 2 which will be available via their website for us to use. I feel that the tidal lagoon will have a huge role to play in not only providing clean energy for the people of Swansea and Wales but also educating people in the importance of sustainable living. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Swansea Bay Business Club
"Swansea Bay Business Club supports the tidal lagoon application. A survey of more than 200 companies in the Swansea Bay region, carried out by the club in the autumn of 2013, revealed overwhelming support for the project. Every business that responded, supported the plans. All agreed that the lagoon would be a positive development which would bring economic and regenerative benefits to the region. Support for this project is founded upon the club's desire to see more research and development of alternative energy sources in the Swansea Bay region. The development of energy supply, including new and alternative sources, is of great importance to local companies. The club is aware of wider strategic benefits to the country in developing more robust self-sufficiency in energy provision. Alternative renewable sources must play a key part in that development. Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon is an example of how those sources can be developed, and will hopefully be the first of several similar schemes around Britain's coastline."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Annalisa Jenkins
"Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon will provide a fantastic legacy and facility for our children. I have two children who both love water sports and fishing. We regularly use the stretch of coast between Porthcawl and the Gower as a family and believe in supporting our local communities. The lagoon will provide a brilliant facility for them to pursue their outdoor activities and interests, particularly fishing, sailing, cycling and swimming. This will be a world class facility that will encourage them to lead a healthy and active lifestyle right here on their door-step. Future generations need opportunities like this if they are are going to prosper. The lagoon will provide recreational facilities through the provision of open space which can be used for walking and cycling while the boating centre will provide access to national standard sailing facilities. This represents a unqiue opportunity for Swansea and the wider area to benefit from an iconic facility that will be accessible to all. We desperately need better recreational and sport facilities in this area. We now have the opportunity to deliver this for our children and future generations to come. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
AstraVia Professional & Technical Recruitment Limited
"I am making a representation on behalf of AstraVia Professional & Technical recruitment Limited in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay Proposal. AstraVia Limited was established by myself and Andrew Brewer in August 2012 and we are based in Gowerton, Swansea. We support local and national companies and work in partnership with them to hire new talent, predominantly in the Engineering, Construction and Professional services sectors. As individuals and as a business we are passionate about the local area and its economy. As a recruitment company we are seeing first-hand how the employment market is steadily improving and the new opportunities that are being created, there is an air of positivity out there and a project of this scale will only enhance this. The project will also put Swansea into the spotlight, and along with our new University campus, we have an opportunity to attract people to the city to study and work who would never before have considered it. I think that the positive effects will be felt locally, and I think we should utilise the skill and talent that is in our local area, the construction phase in particular will create many job opportunities and will have a knock on effect to local education projects, a must needed oomph! In our community; a chance to utilise the local supply chain, as I believe that including the community will enhance the reputation of the lagoon. If Swansea can harness the power of its tidal reach to create clean energy as a stepping stone to maintain our future, then we would be fools not to take this opportunity, if Cardiff were to have this opportunity they would jump at it! Sustainable energy is something that the whole world views now as essential and a necessity. What an opportunity for Swansea to be a talking point for the world. We should as a city do something ground breaking to take us into the next generations and for the city to survive. The tourism that the lagoon will bring will also have a very positive effect on local businesses. The recreational and sporting facilities will encourage events to be held in Swansea and again put us on a global stage. We lost the city of culture to Hull, this would be an opportunity to engage local artists to have a platform to show their talent and again encourage the next generation. In conclusion, the driving force behind the lagoon appear to be passionate about what they want to achieve, I don't believe it is a pipe dream, the positives far far outweigh the negatives. There will be a genuine buzz in the city that we are crying out for, and as a business who believes in Swansea, works here, employs locally, and deals with other local businesses; the vast majority of conversations held are about how magnificent the Lagoon could be, and what an opportunity (that is much needed) for our beloved city. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
WYG on behalf of Dan Morrissey IRL Limited
"The proposed alignment of the access road between Langdon Road and the Dock Road at the eastern end of King's Dock will adversely affect the long term redevelopment potential of land owned by Dan Morrissey IRL Limited. At its western end the route is sinuous and does not reflect the level changes in this area, particularly the retaining wall along the Dock Road. Furthermore, the alignment shown does not appear to reflect the need to cross the Dock Railway at grade or the route of the proposed canal link from the Tennant Canal to Swansea (Swansea UDP Policy HC31). The alignment of the proposed access road alongside the existing Dock Road would create a poor quality public realm. Its alignment adjacent to the dock road offers little potential for landscape enhancement for what would be a strategically important link between SA1 and the new Swansea University Campus to the west. An alternative alignment of the proposed access road further to the north would address our concerns, creating a more direct route through land owned by Dan Morrissey IRL Limited whilst facilitating the crossing of the Dock Railway and the proposed canal route. It would also allow the creation of an appropriate public realm along the route. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Jonathan Thomas
"One of the major additional benefits to the scheme will be the chance to use the lagoon in order to educate students throughout Wales regarding the importance of renewable energy. Section 12 of table 9.2 in the planning statement document states 'TLSB will design, create and run during construction an education programme encompassing primary, secondary and tertiary level education. Within the education facility TLSB will provide space for learning and class visits for on-going educational programmes once the lagoon commences operation.' The chance to see this technology in action will hopefully inspire many to take a further interest in science and engineering. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Louise Coates
"I support this planning process as it will add much benfit to the Swansea coastline."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Spindogs LTD
"As a local digital marketing business employing some 20 people in South Wales, we are very much looking forward to the supply chain opportunities that Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon will bring. This much needed infrastructure investment will create opportunities for businesses like ours to grow. This in turn means that we’ll be able to invest more in our people and facilities. Already, we have had enquiries from local companies who want to update their websites and marketing material to better reflect their offering as potential suppliers of Tidal Lagoon Power. The local economy is set to benefit hugely from the creation of jobs and additional tourism spend in the area. This will have a knock-on effect for everybody plus it will be a great facility to have on our door step. Support an estimated £5m in extra output for Wales, and £2.2m in GVA annually for the region, Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon will lever close to £300m of regional spending spread over a three-year development period resulting in a potential £454m of additional output in Wales. That’s huge and it is investment that is much needed. Swansea Bay and Wales has got a brilliant opportunity to prosper. This is sustainable development at its very best and we don’t know anybody who doesn’t want it to happen. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Swansea Ramblers
"Swansea Ramblers are affiliated to the Ramblers Association which is a large national body which promotes walking and aims to safeguard the environments in which this can take place. We are anxious to register because this is a very large development which is bound to impact on the outlook, the enjoyment of which is an important part of walking pleasure. Large and intrusive constructions would have an obvious effect. In addition there is considerable doubt about the nature of the on-land installations which will service this development. In the light of this, while at this stage we do not state that we wish to make objection, we would like to have the right to do so - or indeed to express approval. Hence we wish to register."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG
"Voith Hydro is a world leading supplier of bulb turbines. I am making this representation on behalf of Voith Hydro, who is tendering for the contract to supply the turbines and generators for Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay. The project represents a significant opportunity for Voith Hydro. The project represents the first in a network of lagoons for which we would hope to supply the turbines and generators for. This represents a benefit for us, and we believe a significant long term economic benefit for Swansea Bay. We further believe that the benefits of the development outweigh its limited impact. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Acorn
"I make this representation on behalf of leading Welsh business Acorn - the largest recruitment and training provider in Wales, with a turnover of over £100m, 38 offices UK-wide, filling some 5,000 work placements each week. We are fully supportive of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal - we firmly see the proposal as hugely valuable and positive in many important ways - environmentally, both in terms of the way it will operate and the power it will generate; economically, not only as a result of the range of job opportunities it will provide in the short-term, but also over the long-term, and also its focus on developing local strategic partnerships and working wherever possible with a Welsh-based supply chain (construction, materials, manufacturing, equipment, etc.) to help secure wider economic benefit. Additionally, this showcase project will position Swansea Bay and Wales as a forerunner internationally in developing and implementing these technologies - creating new opportunities in a huge and growing global market for Wales to export related IP and technology, parts and materials developed and manufactured in Wales. Locally, this project will be a source of massive pride to its community - for which there would be additional benefits such as reduced energy rates, tourism / visitor attraction, educational visits, learning and development, etc. and also generally for Wales a whole therefore. On so many levels this project will clearly provide a major boost to the people of Wales. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
DavyMarkham Ltd
"DavyMarkham is particularly interested in this project as we have traditionally manufactured turbines for many UK and overseas projects, including all the turbines for the Dinorwig power station, Foyers and Cruachan. We are very keen to participate in this project and if successful, would not only safeguard our current workforce, but would also generate new jobs. Projects such as these are very important as it enables us to keep and develop our skills in the manufacture and supply of highly specialised mechanical equipment. Our company is an SME employing 200 people and for the last 20 years has relied very heavily on exports. To maintain and grow our exports, it is vital that there are sufficient home grown projects. We have seen a significant decline in the UK in hydro projects. This project, and as we understand it similar future projects, would certainly reverse this trend."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
JW Morris Limited on behalf of JW Morris Limited
"I am making representation on behalf of JW Morris Limited in that we believe the benefits to our company are clear. The construction of the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon will offer business opportunities to JW Morris and it's skilled engineering workforce who almost all live in South Wales and offer the required skill set relevant to aspects of this project. This and other engineering disciplines will also benefit other companies in the south Wales and Swansea region as a whole providing positive economic and social aspects to the south and west Wales area. The project would enable our local region to be at the heart of the Renewable Energy development sector with obvious advantages for local employment, skilled labour and training providers. The "ripple effect" it would impact would be a positive secondary benefit to other businesses in the area such as manufacturing, retail, accommodation providers, food outlets and providers of safety gear and technical component wholesalers. These benefits would not only be apparent during the construction phase but the maintenance and operational phases too providing well paid jobs in the energy and engineering sector. The tourism and leisure element of the project will also create employment opportunities as well as an aesthetically pleasing aspect to Swansea Bay. The power station's generation capacity for clean renewable energy will also reduce the dependence on traditional fossil fuel power plants and help the Principality towards it's goals of energy generation from renewable sources. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mr Robert Mainwaring
"I support this project because as a small business owner and employer in Swansea, I believe this lagoon will bring massive investment to our city through jobs and especially tourism. My business in selling fishing tackle to the anglers and holiday makers of Swansea and this new structure will provide a unique and fantastic venue for people to pursue outdoor activities (especially fishing). We would be able to hold national type fishing competitions, set-up a regular coaching scheme for beginners and especially junior and disabled anglers and the sheer numbers of people who would want to walk, cycle, fish from such an incredible structure that takes them into the heart of Swansea bay would be a huge benefit to the whole city. I would also be interested in purchasing/leasing some kind or retail unit that could possible be included in the visitor centre. Yours Sincerely Robert Mainwaring Mainwarings Angling Centre "
Ymgyngoreion Statudol Eraill
Network Rail Infrastructure Limited
"Network Rail Infrastructure Limited owns and operates the mainline railway infrastructure of Great Britain. Network Rail Infrastructure Limited (Network Rail) is listed in the Book of Reference. However, according to Network Rail's records, although the red line boundary comes close to Network Rail's land, it does not cross it. Network Rail understands that the land which has been identified as belonging to it is land that formerly vested in BRB (Residuary) Limited (BRBR). However, this land did not transfer to Network Rail from BRBR. It is Network Rail's understanding that this land now vests in the Secretary of State for Transport. It follows that Network Rail has no objection to the Order, and there is no need for protective provisions in Network Rail's favour. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
P Davies
"Having watched the promotional film and looked at the website I wish to add my support to this very exciting project. As a teacher at a local school I can see the benefits that the project could bring from an educational perspective. The proposed tidal lagoon would be an excellent resource for local school pupils. Pupils would have access to seeing how a renewable energy source could be utilised and they would be able to develop their understanding of climate change. This would tie in with the curriculum teaching of sustainable development as well as links with the science courses. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Prof Calvin Jones
"During 2013 I was involved, in my capacity as a regional and environmental economist, in a project examining the potential economic impact of the Tidal Lagoon. During this study I became convinced personally of the uniqueness and importance of this development; for both the local and regional economy, and in terms of its environmental performance. The cf 5000 or so jobs our project estimated as consequent are actually not the important part. That, rather is the genuine commitment of the developers to use the Swansea Bay project to revitalise key sectors and activities in Wales on the back of further and wider developments, which would contribute early and significantly to addressing our climate change issues. It is rare that energy developments at this scale offer so much benefit for such modest environmental cost, and with the backing of the vast majority of local and policy stakeholders. I therefore encourage the Inspectorate to look favourably on this high quality and much needed project. Yours Calvin Jones Professor of Economics Cardiff Business School."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Robin Teverson
"I support this application on the basis that it is an important example of enabling new means of renewable energy generation. This particular project will be on national importance in terms of demonstrating tidal lagoons and allowing he technology to move forward in the United Kingdom as a whole. The scheme itself appears well designed and takes into consideration the various potential ecological issues."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
South Wales Chamber of Commerce
"As a Representative Organisation of the Private Sector Business Community we have a primary interest in economic development in Wales and within our manifesto a determination to support renewable energy development. We see huge opportunity for the supply chain businesses into the sector and the development of key skills and employment as the sector grows and expands. Within the various scheme's being progressed there are also community benefits which need to be steered to sustainable development of new businesses."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
South West Wales Tourism Partnership
"SWWTP has a specific remit to help develop and promote the tourism economy in South West Wales Notwithstanding the wider economic potential of the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon, its opportunities to create a significant visitor attraction / amenity is of particular interest - to the entire SW Wales region"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Swansea Civic Society
"The Civic Society encourages local pride in our City, from its industrial origins to the modern city it now is, promoting high standards of architecture and planning. The Society plays an active role current proposals and developments for the City and Bay, carefully scrutinising planning applications and other proposals for significant change being constructive in our proposals and responses to any planning or strategy documents. We believe that the proposed Tidal Lagoon for Swansea Bay has the potential to provide a wide range of benefits to the City and the Bay area from the more obvious environmental wins (reduced emissions and reliable low carbon electricity), to positive impacts on the local economy and beyond this to social inclusion and health benefits. Generation and supply: The lagoon will produce sustainable and predictable electricity during its expected economic life of over 120 years with the offer of a discounted local electricity scheme for those that live in the Swansea Bay region. Supply chain and construction jobs for South Wales A significant number of the component parts for the building of the lagoon will be manufactured or fabricated locally. These could include turbine housings, sluice gates, flood doors, rails, electrical controls, hydraulics, precast concrete components, the visitor centre and ancillary buildings. TLSB anticipate that investment for these components is estimated to be in the region of £300m and early estimates suggest 2,880 construction jobs could be created, covering a range of skill levels. The Swansea Civic Society supports this major benefit to the area, with the additional potential to raise skill levels and training both short and long term. Increase in technology tourism: The proposal will bring people from all over the world to view the Lagoon. It has been estimated that once constructed, the tourism facility will attract 70-100,000 visitors and would drive considerable GVA (Gross Value Added) to South Wales and create around 40 tourism-related jobs. This, the Swansea Civic Society supports and considers that it builds upon the cities heritage of innovation and industry. Recreation and Amenity Facilities: The Swansea Civic Society supports the ambition for the lagoon to become a major attraction and recreational amenity committed to showcasing tidal range technology and providing a local amenity for opportunities in the arts, education, recreation and culture. This will create a new focal point on the East Side of the city complementing the continuing SA1 developments which include residential and entertainment. The significant potential for the tidal lagoon to become a foundation venue for local and national sports use is inspiring. We see the potential for cycling, walking and running around the lagoon wall, as well as open water swimming, rowing and sailing as further example of this. Regeneration: As part of three local councils’ ambitions to develop Swansea Bay with City Region status, the tidal lagoon could form a cornerstone development for Swansea Bay City Region as regards marine energy, as well as helping to facilitate local regeneration objectives in South Wales and stimulating a vibrant waterfront economy. "
Sefydliadau Anstatudol
Swansea Friends of the Earth
"Swansea Friends of the Earth supports the development of renewable energy technology and feel developments of this nature are essential in order to reduce CO2 emissions and prevent runaway climate change. However we realise any such complex planning application may need improving in order to minimise any negative impact on the environment. We therefore reserve the right to make constructive suggestions in order to improve the application"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Paul Madin
"The opportunity exists for the UK to become a global leader in tidal lagoon power generation that will provide considerable employment for our smart young engineers. That's why I'm strongly in favour of it."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Phil Morgan
"I write in support of this project. It will provide a much needed amenity value to the area and promote a safe environment for waterspouts. The barrage itself will offer a safe area to walk,run or possibly cycle with great views. The provision of green ,renewable energy cannot be measured, especially as it will be largely hidden from view,unlike the intrusive windfarms currently favoured by energy companies. Swansea has seen a decline in manufacturing and heavy industry and I feel that tourism is the only way forward. This project will provide a much needed attraction with the added benefits of short term construction employment. Environmentally, I feel that the benefits outweigh the disadvantages such as forced relocation of some wildlife.I am sure these will be mitigated by the relatively slow construction phase allowing the wildlife time to adjust. Lastly, please, please get a move on with planning stage as history has proved our performance in this area to be lethargic at best. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Colourbox
"I am making a representation on behalf of Colourbox in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. I believe a development such as this will work as a catalyst for the whole city. One of the most underused assets is Swansea's bay and this innovative project is the perfect way to begin to address this. It will be a talking point, a destination for local people, a tourist attraction, and an environmental resource. It will boost the amount of visitors to the area, improve the atmosphere of SA1 and benefit local businesses. In addition to the extra visitors, construction of the lagoon will also create jobs and this increase revenue spent across the city. Our business directly supports other businesses through branding, marketing and websites. So we can only benefit from the city enjoying any increase in revenue. If approved, the Tidal Lagoon will undoubtedly be a major asset to not just the city, but the whole of Wales and even the UK. From an environmental point of view, it's evident that the project will make a significant contribution to sustainable energy, and the fact that it's based in Swansea is something for the city to be incredibly proud of. In addition, on a personal level, I'm a father of two, aged 2 and 10. Investing in the future is not only something that's important to me because it affects their future but it's also a concept that my eldest daughter has embraced. She is a member of her school's eco committee, and even at the young age of 10 is incredibly enthusiastic about the project, along with many of her peers. The boost, focus, motivation and belief that this project gives our children gives us all hope for the future."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Marine Energy Pembrokeshire
"I am making this representation on behalf of Marine Energy Pembrokeshire (MEP) in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB) proposal. MEP is a partnership between technology developers, supply chain companies, statutory bodies and academia working collaboratively to create a “centre for Excellence” for marine energy generation in Pembrokeshire. From our inception in 2010 the organisation has rapidly expanded and now includes over 45 members, 22 of which are wave and tidal developers with an interest in deployment across Wales. Whilst our initial focus was Pembrokeshire our work is now mainly pan-Wales. We believe that TLSB is an essential component of a comprehensive package of renewable energy developments across Wales which will provide long term benefits in creating a new low carbon economy with high valued jobs and growth. Specific benefits are as follows: 1. Climate Change – globally marine renewable energy is increasingly being seen as an important contributor to addressing the impacts of climate change. TLSB has an important role to play in supporting the UK agenda on Climate change. a. Reduce CO2 emissions through 0 carbon technology saving up to c.216,000 tonnes CO2 p.a. b. Assist government in meeting its increasingly ambitious renewable energy targets – EU to source 20% of its energy from renewables by 2020 2. Electricity Generation – The project aims to produce a significant amount of electricity – 240MW which the potential to increase significantly with each new build out project. a. Creating a home grown secure electricity source b. Filling the growing UK energy deficit c. Becoming an essential part of the UK energy mix, preventing overreliance on one energy source. 3. Economic Benefits – TLSB is the world's first man made lagoon which if successfully based in Swansea will be a global leader, further supporting the UK’s leading status in the marine energy industry. a. Job creation – the project is initially proposing 20,000 jobs with significant increases in the longer term, particularly indirectly via the supply chain. b. Supply Chain – MEP are particularly supportive of the company's approach to securing 65% UK Content and to the establishment of the Lagoon Industry Advisory Group to assist in achieving this ambition. In conclusion MEP believe that TLSB has a key role to play in supporting Wales in leading a global marine energy industry and maximising the benefits for the Welsh and UK economy. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Prof. Karen Ingham
"I have been present at the SBTL public consultation meetings and also took part in the two-day workshop organised by Cape Farewell, the agency responsible for creating sustainable community links in relation to the arts agenda and cultural potential and impact of the proposal. Therefore, I am well versed in the arguments and have heard and been presented with much of the evidence first hand from experts from Marine Biology (Swansea University and SMU) and from the sports and arts communities. In particular I have been representing the Faculty of Art and Design at Swansea Metropolitan and have been part of discussions around how the project will create opportunities for students and recent graduates, in addition to the many possibilities the project offers for community involvement in the arts. I am fully convinced that this proposal should be supported and backed without reserve, as it represents a unique opportunity for the Swansea Bay and Neath PT Bay areas. In summary it will: Be a world first and will boost the profile and international recognition of the area Bring economic growth to the area by providing jobs Will stimulate tourism both in the UK and beyond Will create lasting legacy in the form of the sports opportunities, the architectural dimension, the cultural and community arts programme, and the investment in encouraging the regeneration of the area It will also stimulate and regenerate the historic Oyster beds, providing jobs locally and touristic interest It will provide subsidised green energy for locals and will provide a blueprint for similar low carbon energy projects It will cause minimal disruption to the marine environment It will, in short, be an incredible opportunity that should be fully supported. Thank you for your time. Yours, Prof. Karen Ingham, Professor of Art and Science Interactions"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Prospect Energy Ltd
"We are making this representation on behalf of Prospect Energy Ltd in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Proposal (TLSB). Prospect Energy Ltd provides consultancy services and direct project assistance for both traditional and renewable energy technologies to public and private sector organisations around the UK and internationally. The renewable energy focused teams at Prospect Energy and indeed at our sister firm Prospect Law, feel very strongly that the TLSB, and in particular the tidal power technologies which this scheme will be deploying in UK waters, has the potential to play a key role in the development of renewable energy technologies in Britain. It is quite clearly an incredibly exciting proposal with far reaching lessons to teach in terms of engineering skills, skills which can be used at other places around the coasts of the UK. This factor, together with the clean energy which the TLSB will generate is key to our support, bearing in mind the country’s requirement to deliver on its climate change commitments over the coming years. Apart from the green energy and engineering benefits which we believe will bring benefits to the UK economy as a whole, the TLSB proposal will provide a massive boost we believe for the economy of Swansea and indeed of South Wales regionally. We have followed the proposal closely and we very much look forward to seeing it continuing to evolve through its licensing, and environmental due diligence phases, and above all we hope that the proposal will receive the planning permission it clearly deserves. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Swansea Business Forum on behalf of Swansea Business Forum
"The Swansea Business Forum is in favour of the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon project. According to the published literature, nearly 2,000 construction jobs would be created, along with 60 long-term operational ones, with up to a further 90 linked to visitor spending. We believe as a Forum there is significant potential for further on-going tourist income as well as the possibility of Centres of Excellence to emerge in Lagoon-related technology within the Swansea Bay and the wider South West Wales region. The fact that it is also, of course, an environmentally “clean” project, has positive climate-related aspects. The Swansea Business Forum comprises senior representatives of the major business organisations active in South West Wales, including the Federation of Small Businesses, the Institute of Directors, South Wales Chamber of Commerce, the Confederation of British Industry and the Swansea Business Club. These organisations represent the interests of thousands of SMEs and other companies within the region. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
TenCate Geosynthetics Netherlands bv
"I am making this presentation on behalf of TenCate Geosynthetics Netherlands bv (a 100% Royal TenCate NV subsidiary) in support of the Tidal lagoon Swansea bay proposal. TenCate Geosynthetics is a large business based in Nijverdal, The Netherlands. TenCate Geosynthetics employs about 85 people and are a subsidiary of a multinational company. The vision of Royal TenCate is to protect people and planet. We believe that the SBTL proposal fits in this vision by realising green energy and will provide following benefits to our business. The construction of the proposed bund for the tidal lagoon, with our specially for this purpose developed TenCate Geotube® large textile filled sand elements, will open up new market possibilities for TenCate Geosynthetics to build bunds of this size on an economically feasible and environmentally friendly ( low Carbon footprint) way. The application of this technology in the UK stretches from use in future tidal lagoon, as well as rapid deployment flood defence structures. In cooperation with our partners TLSB and van Oord Dredging and marine Contractors bv (a multinational marine contractor) we are in a development process that will bring a new dimension in building breakwaters, dams dikes and levees. This method that saves the use of natural resources will possibly create extra jobs during the installation phase of the bund. The proposal will attract engineering companies, governmental bodies from all over the world to view the lagoon, the method of building and the energy production from all over the world. We believe that this project will serve as an example because it is the first in the world to be built with this technology. It will be beneficial to the local economy and will also have a positive exposure on our proposed technology In conclusion we believe that this environmentally friendly energy producing project will have a positive exposure to TenCate in their mission to protect people and planet. Further to this we believe that not only TenCate will benefit from this development but that also the total region will benefit of the positive exposure of this project "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
The Development Trusts Association Wales
"The Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay will be the first of a large number of lagoon projects that must be built around the coast of the UK. It is imperative that this project is built is built by the private sector to demonstrate they way in which we can move much more rapidly to a carbon neutral society and mitigate against global climate change. 1. This project has also been very carefully analysed as to its environmental effects and overall it can be seen to make a positive contribution especially when compared to a tidal barrage which can have a major impact on migratory species as well as affect the rates of deposition of alluvial material. 2. Can be completed with private sector money 3. They have included social benefit as part of their forward planning 4. It will create local jobs 5. Can act a tourist location 6. Can have water sports built into the project 7. Can act as a location for various aquaculture projects 8. Because it does not obstruct tidal flows to any great extent it odes not have any of the negative effects that a tidal barrage has and leaves the waterways largely unimpeded "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Whale and Dolphin Conservation
"WDC consider that there is not enough information on the possible effectiveness of proposed mitigation or when this will be deployed. As there is no information from site based surveys the ES cannot quantify possible impacts and so cannot be certain that there will be no adverse impacts on the favourable conservation status of the local porpoise population. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FOR WALES on behalf of BYRON DAVIES CONSERVATIVE ASSEMBLY MEMBER FOR SOUTH WALES WEST
"In the main, I am supportive of the Tidal Lagoon project, however, set out below are the concerns that my constituents in South West Wales have.I would not fully endorse this project until such concerns have been addressed: 1. Guarantee that the water quality within the Bay is not adversely affected by this development. I would draw the Inspector's attention to the letter from NRW-Para 8 - Water Quality. It states that 'the potential exists for storm sewage, final effluent or a combination of both, could sit in the lagoon for protracted periods of time.' (a) the sewer system has not enjoyed the input of funding to upgrade it. NRW have inherited a system which requires a hugh amount of investment just to keep the existing infrastructure working. (b)due to the fact that UV disinfection only reduces the bacterial content and does not eliminate it, illustrates to me that the preferred option would be to extend the outfall pipework well beyond the outer seawall of the lagoon and not to enclose it within the lagoon.(c) constituents have highlighted problems with effluent being pump into the sea around Gower coastline from other treatment works which are unable to cope with the increase in outfall; I believe that the WWTW(Swansea Waste Water Treatment Works) might not be able to cope with the intermittent storm water outflow either. (d) it would appear that WFD (Water Framework Directive) water body is already failing to meet statutory EU targets, even Mumbles Head outfall is currently under investigation as to whether the outfall would operate as permitted. (e) it appears that the dispersion of storm sewage may be sub-optimal and impact on a number of designated bathing waters along Gower peninsula. (f) possible heavy rainfall could preclude water contact sports within the Bay. (a)-(f) above would be contrary to the WFD's objectives which are to help protect and enhance the quality of surface freshwater (including lakes, streams and rivers) groundwaters, ground water dependant ecosystems, estuaries and coastal waters out to one mile from low-water. 2. There is also concern over the impact of the water quality on a mussel farm located at Queens Dock.There already exists extreme concern over the 'mortality rate' in the cockle beds in North Gower which may have resulted from the effects of effluent around the coastline of Gower. 3. Constituents have voiced their concerns over the visual impact of the Visitor Centre combined with the outeer wall of the lagoon. The height of the bunds at 18.5m, with the Visitor Centre, two floors below ground level, three floors above at a height of 33.5m from Chart Datum making a total of 52m is extremely high. Even with the distance between the shoreline of Gower and the Visitor Centre, residents have approached me from the Mumbles area stating that they consider it to be imposing and detrimental to the visual impact and amenity of the area. Thank you for the opportunity to highlight these concerns and I look forward to your response in due course."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Neath Port Authority
"Although the port supports the project in principle it is on the firm understanding that Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB) will undertake various navigation works within the port to accommodate the proximity of the lagoon and as agreed and minuted during meetings with their engineers. In addition the TLSB solicitors will produce a legal document covering these issues, plus protecting the port in perpetuity against any future adverse navigation problems for the port due to the position and operation of the lagoon. This document is to be thoroughly checked by the port's solicitors to ensure the port is adequatley protected throughout the construction plus the long term operation of the lagoon."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Andrew Scott Ltd
"Andrew Scott Ltd has been operating as a Main Contractor throughout Wales for over 140 years and we specialise in the multi-disciplines of civil engineering works and building construction; in addition to the conservation and renovation of Listed Buildings and Scheduled Ancient Monuments. Operating with an overall philosophy based on quality and innovation, Andrew Scott Ltd is firmly committed to consolidating its current position within the industry whilst continuing to provide an unrivalled service to its clients. Our main business streams are Industrial, Commercial, Health, Education, Retail, Leisure, Residential and Listed Buildings with our clients comprising an eclectic mix from both the public and private sectors. We pride ourselves in our co-operative approach and expertise in dealing with the often sensitive nature and varied demands associated with construction; often working within live environments. Our talented Management Teams are supported by a first-class workforce of some 140 directly employed site supervisors and operatives, the majority of whom have been employed by Andrew Scott Ltd in excess of 10 years and offer a wide variety of site based skills and experience. Our highly skilled workforce allows us to provide our clients with technical competence and professionalism whilst ensuring all work is undertaken safely and securely. With an annual turnover approaching £50M, we can successfully undertake projects valued between £100,000 - £25m. We are fully supportive of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal - we firmly see the proposal as hugely valuable and positive in many important ways - environmentally, both in terms of the way it will operate and the power it will generate; economically, not only as a result of the range of job opportunities it will provide in the short-term, but also over the long-term, and also its focus on developing local strategic partnerships and working wherever possible with a Welsh-based supply chain (construction, materials, manufacturing, equipment, etc.) to help secure wider economic benefit. Additionally, this showcase project will position Swansea Bay and Wales as a forerunner internationally in developing and implementing these technologies - creating new opportunities in a huge and growing global market for Wales to export related IP and technology, parts and materials developed and manufactured in Wales. Locally, this project will be a source of massive pride to its community - for which there would be additional benefits such as reduced energy rates, tourism / visitor attraction, educational visits, learning and development, etc. and also generally for Wales a whole therefore. On so many levels this project will clearly provide a major boost to the people of Wales."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
EEF The Manufacturers Organisation
"EEF is interested to understand and support the supply chain opportunities and assist businesses to provide competitive activities."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Ian Titherington
"As a Civil Engineer of 23 years post graduate experience, someone who was born and bred in Swansea and as a passionate environmentalist, I am convinced that this application is not only a sound engineering proposition, but also a phenomenal opportunity to put Swansea, Wales and the UK as the global leader in tidal energy production. Every query I have raised about both the design and its environmental implications have been answered, the local community has been genuinely consulted by the applicants and there is a real feeling of excitement in the region about this outstanding proposal. I sincerely hope that it receives consent, in recognition that it will not only put Swansea Bay on the global map of renewable energy, but also ensure that Wales and the UK can further develop this technology around many other areas of coast - for the benefit of so many other communities. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Margaret Minhinnick
"I have seen a Tidal Lagoon presentation which was very impressive. I am very much in support of renewable energy development. I believe it is the way forward for energy production and that as a nation we should be seriously and urgently backing it. Climate change is as Ban Ki-Moon , Secretary General, United Nations, says the greatest threat to mankind's future - posing a risk to 1/8th of the world's population living in coastal areas. The Fukushima effect has altered opinion worldwide on Nuclear Power - it is not the way forward, is expensive, with massive planning and building delays and too risky. The Tidal Lagoon project will produce significant renewable energy and at a reasonable cost- it is a positive gesture for a safer future."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
New Sandfields Aberafan and Afan
"Representation in Support of the Tidal Lagoon (Swansea Bay) Ltd The following comprises an offer of support for the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay scheme on behalf New Sandfields Aberavon (NSA Afan). NSA Afan is a member led, community based regeneration organisation that is a Company Limited by Guarantee, (3674953) and a Registered Charity, (1088934) and it is governed by a Board of Director Trustees. The purpose of the organisation is to support regeneration to enable a better quality of life for people living in the most disadvantaged communities in Neath Port Talbot and Swansea Bay area. It is the Lead Delivery Body for the Sandfields Aberavon Communities First Cluster, the Grant Recipient Body for a number of grants, the Lead Sponsor for an ESF Employment project called NSA Afan Strides Alliance which has engaged with over 2,000 economically inactive and unemployed participants annually and have placed 1 in 4 into employment. We currently employ 44 staff. Benefits • Job Creation Based on Chapter 22 of the ES the proposal is expected to create a diversity of jobs throughout the entire lifetime of the project. We anticipate working with Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB) in the provision of training and up-skilling individuals within our community to help place them into jobs directly related to the project and to assist them into work placements that will be available in the support industries that will be created by the project. We envisage the project will create employment opportunities in Construction, Engineering, Renewable technology, Transport and logistics. In the long term this development will create employment in tourism, recreation, maintenance and community related activities. In addition, indirect employment created in servicing the growth in local support industries. • Amenity – NSA Afan represents the communities of Sandfields and Aberafan, an area recognised by the Welsh Government as an area of social deprivation in the top 10% of the Index of Multiple Deprivations (IMD). The development of public sports and leisure amenities around the Tidal Lagoon will provide an excellent resource in the immediate area to encourage tourism, inward investment and further development of the Swansea Bay infrastructure. • History - the industrial areas of South Wales were once reliant on the production of steel and copper with coal as the main source of energy, wealth and job creation. We welcome the development of the Tidal Lagoon that will provide clean energy and benefit over 150,000 households and at the same time provide a high quality tourist attraction and local amenity that can benefit Neath Port Talbot and the wider Swansea Bay area which can act as a signpost as a gateway to West Wales. We consider the development to have historical importance as a benchmark that will highlight the forward thinking approach of the Welsh Government, Local authorities and citizens of Wales. We believe future generations will consider this development and others like it, as standard practice for energy production in the 21st century. Ian Isaac – Chief Executive March 2014 "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Sustainable Wales
"We are a charity committed to sustainable development. We focus on society , economy, jobs, community activism, artistic creativity and their inter connection with the natural world. We work with businesses, community and voluntary groups and government bodies. For nearly twenty years we have been involved in analysing and disseminating information on a number of green energy related projects. For almost two years our officers have been in contact with the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon project culminating in a meeting in January involving the charity, local civic and community leaders and the project’s development director, Mr Ioan Jenkins. He was able to answer all the questions thrown at him by a critical and knowledgeable group. He has also been in contact since, specifically over waste control and management. Clearly there are still some grey areas but we believe the project will produce renewable energy in the quantity and at a price that makes it very attractive. We believe the environmental impact is manageable and in fact could provide a beneficial marine and leisure industry for the local area, providing jobs and increasing the community’s well-being. An exciting possibility in these times of climate change is the developer’s view that lagoons like this on other coasts could also enhance sea defences e.g. Conway, North Wales. Their ideas for other lagoons on the Bristol Channel might be the seed to plan an integrated energy region incorporating the Government’s plans for Hinkley Point and the myriad of projects for wind farms, biomass plants and other schemes. Many of them spring up on an ad hoc basis without relevance to other projects or the communities which they will affect. The Swansea Bay company’s other ideas for the long term development of an industry to build lagoons and their turbines in Wales is also an ambition we would embrace and encourage. What has impressed us above all is that they seem to be a sensible, efficient business, hopefully with the ability to realise an ambitious plan which will have an important place in providing an energy future that doesn't cost the Earth. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
The Dragon Hotel
"I am making a representation on behalf of The Dragon Hotel in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. The Dragon Hotel is a 4* full service, independent hotel located in Swansea City. Currently employing over 100 team members the hotel has been a cornerstone of post war Swansea for over 50 years. Our guests include corporate and leisure overnight visitors, health club members and locals attending our award winning Brasserie and varied function suites. I believe the TLSB proposal will provide the following benefits to the Swansea Bay area: • Job Creation - directly with the 1,850 full time equivalent jobs during construction and 60 full time equivalent jobs during operation - indirectly supporting further jobs in tourism, science, sport and leisure industries - indirectly due to the increased economic prosperity in the region due to these jobs • Investment in Swansea and Wales - leading the way in tidal lagoon technology, ensuring global recognition - development of new industry in the region - opening the region to further developing export opportunities • Education, Social and Environmental - clean source of renewable energy - regeneration of an industrial heritage - a managed marine environment - a venue for international sport and education I believe that The Dragon Hotel will benefit from this proposal because it will increase demand for overnight accommodation in Swansea city centre whilst simultaneously improving economic prosperity in the region which will increase the uptake of non-essential commodities such as gym membership, dining out and special event celebrations. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Hornbill Engineering Limited
"This representation is on behalf of Hornbill Engineering Ltd in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB) proposal. Established in Llandarcy, Neath in 1989 and celebrating 25 years in Business, Hornbill has extensive experience with large blue chip companies within the energy sector including; renewable, LNG and Utilities. Employing over 100 staff, Hornbill provides full turnkey solutions for specialist services in the field of process control, instrumentation, electrical systems, high voltage and training. This means Hornbill can assist clients from project conception all of the way through design, manufacture, install, testing, and maintenance to decommissioning for low voltage, instrumentation, hazardous area and high voltage. TLSB could benefit Hornbill from build through to commissioning and maintenance. Based on the conclusions of appendix 22.1 of the Environmental Statement (ES) we project that if we were to take a small market share would have a substantial effect on Hornbill’s current structure and resource. We would need to increase investment into the company, create extra skilled jobs and trainees. Hornbill is committed to developing young people through apprenticeships and trainee programmes. Being involved with TLSB could potentially result in higher skills and income within the region, having a knock on effect to local businesses and the local economy. Additionally increase in business for our local supply chain would occur as a direct result of our involvement in this project. TLSB would have an international appeal, opening up the world market and the possibility of international export for Hornbill. The international interest will also bring in tourism and interest from all over the world, having a large positive impact on the region, local business and the local economy, supporting the claims made in the ES chapter 22 on economy, tourism and recreation. Renewable energy is an emerging and progressive market. Scientific advancements enable methods of renewable energy to be more effective and efficient whilst lowering the impact to the environment and local eco-systems. At a time when the demand for energy is ever increasing, renewable power provides a valuable contribution that potentially far outweighs the environmental impacts. As a forerunner for tidal lagoon renewable energy on this scale, Swansea Bay will ensure their place on the world stage for renewable power. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mabey Bridge Ltd
"Mabey Bridge Ltd fully support the ceartion of the Swansea Tidal Lagoon as a world first for Wales and a key investment in the renewables sector in WAles"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Alan Rayner
"I wish to be registered as an “Interested Party” at the Examination of this project. This is an individual representation – totally apart from any organisation with which I am or have been associated. I intend to submit written representations in due course. In order to comply with the terms of the 2008 Act I affirm that I am in support of this application and that I hope that a Development Consent Order for it will be granted. In the interests of transparency I should state that I am a shareholder in TLSB – not with a view to making financial profit from investment but as a manifestation of my support for the principle of Tidal Lagoons and their potential contribution to provision of electricity from a sustainable resource (tidal range) over decades (and perhaps over centuries) to come. That said, it is important to ensure that all relevant factors are considered so that the eventual DCO has the full-hearted consent of the large majority of stakeholders. I am heartened that the Consultation Report indicates an 86% approval rating by the public. The following points are not in priority order – each should be considered on its merits. a) The Scoping Opinion for this project indicated a capacity of 250-350Mw. Thus I am concerned that the s46 notice and the website overview page refer to just 240Mw as the capacity. I would hope that the eventual DCO does not impose such a limit and that the applicants will have scope to increase the capacity – as may become feasible in the light of technological progress over the next two/three years – but provided that there is no breach of the physical dimensions included in the DCO. b) I am a resident of Northern Devon. An anomaly in the 2008 Act (s43, s102 etc) means that the Local Authorities in Devon do not have a right to submit a Local Impact Report under s60 of the Act. However, the Examining Authority at another project came up with the concept of a “Local Impact Statement” for authorities separated from the project site by a body of water. I would hope that the Devon authorities will be invited to submit an LIS – although my informal soundings have ascertained that they do not envisage that significant impacts on that county will arise from this project. The anomaly has been noted in a submission to the 2014 review of the 2008 Act but, of course, it still applies for this application. c) I will ask the ExA to invite representatives of two organisations (identified below) to participate in the Examination despite such organisations not having registered as Interested Parties by 11th April – given the impact that they could have on significant issues before the Examination. The Outer Bristol Channel has been inferred by the European Commission in relation to its proposed “Article 258” action (arising from alleged failure by DEFRA to consider designation of particular SACs in the vicinity of the local coastal areas). Thus I will request the Examining Authority to invite relevant officials from both the European Commission and DEFRA to prepare a Statement of Common Ground on this – even if neither of them has been registered as an Interested Party. A detail submission is intended to be made in advance of the Preliminary Meeting for ExA consideration of a procedural decision. d) The ExA will be requested to ask the Applicant and the relevant local authorities to consider making a s106 agreement establishing a local scheme for Electrical subsidy in terms similar to section 14 of the document (arising from NSIP: Rookery South Resource Recovery) located at: http://www.centralbedfordshire.gov.uk/Images/ covanta%20106%209%205%2011_tcm5-39964_tcm6-12512.pdf. A detail submission is intended to be made for consideration at the Preliminary Meeting. e) The applicant is to be commended also for not straying into the territory of other renewable energy technologies – although inclusion of photo-voltaic panels on the roofs of some project buildings is to be welcomed. f) The approach to the project given by the City and County of Swansea in their Destination Management plan and Vision 2020 report are to be welcomed. It is to be hoped that these can provide a template on which other local authorities can build for similar Tidal Lagoon initiatives elsewhere on Bristol Channel coasts. g) The applicant is to be commended for the aim of incorporating ancillary features into the overall design – both for the project and the wider surrounding area. This Examination will be the opportunity to uncover any unconsidered obstacles and to allow these features to become accepted components of the overall design. There is a significant advantage in a location adjacent to the shoreline and close to a catchment area that is attractive to large numbers of people. h) Bringing rock from Cornwall by sea is another example of sustainability being part of the thinking about this project. The withdrawal of the Atlantic Array project means that inter-project clashes are unlikely to arise – although both Bristol Port Company (who have major expansion plans) and the promoters of Hinkley “C” should be invited to confirm that they have no concerns about the TLSB project. i) The applicant seems to have “lagged” somewhat on securing its grid connection at Baglan. The National Grid “TEC” register for April 2014 appears not to have mention of this project. Baglan has “slots” for 2015 and 2018 in relation to Abernedd power station. One could ask how confident TLSB is of securing a connection. Why is there not an entry on the TEC register? Hopefully the Examining Authority will be asking for clarification on this in their “first round” questions. j) In any event, an over-riding principle in relation to cabling should be minimisation of disruption to local communities (and also in this case to an SSSI). Thus it will be very important for the local authorities to identify any other potential projects in the area that could be contemplating a connection between Swansea Bay and Baglan. Also, the applicant should be asked to confirm that there are no plans (however vague) to expand from the current project to create “TLSB-Mark Two” – for instance by creating an outer lagoon that would surround/extend the current proposals (eg a sea wall from the Kings Dock to BaglanBay including Neath river). k) Although not formally part of this examination it will be important to explore as many aspects of lagoon technology as possible. This one is a prototype for others – and the Crown Estate have been consulting on the concept of inviting interest from developers for leases on other near-shore waters around the UK coast. Thus, this TLSB project will provide a “base line” from which future projects can be compared. It will be essential therefore to get this one “right” in order to expedite development of future Tidal Range projects based on lagoon concepts (cf EN-3 para 1.8.2). l) When considering the benefits/detriments equation it may relevant to note that Tidal Range projects are additional to the “Round Three” off-shore wind programme (as would be the establishment of an inter-connector from wind-farms in the Irish Midlands – although that project, not an NSIP, is not progressing as fast as might have been hoped). Over recent months the Round Three provision has been subject to reductions. Not only has the Atlantic Array been withdrawn (losing 1.5Gw from the plan) but Forewind have recently “thrown away” 1.8 Gw by reducing the Dogger Bank plan from 9.0 to just 7.2Gw. Thus Tidal Range is needed to replenish some of the lost Wind total - with the significant advantages of the output being much more predictable, robust and sustainable and the infrastructure having greater longevity. m) There seems to be a lack of detail as to how the detrimental effects of piling (on both humans and marine mammals) will be mitigated. More specificity will be needed. n) More detail work on navigation risks seems to be required. Experience from the Atlantic Array indicates that this may not be as simple as it seems at first sight. o) I may wish to exercise the right to comment on ANY issue coming before the Examination - in the light of other submissions made or questions asked etc. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
David Nussbaum
"The Background The UK needs to develop new ways to provide the power we need, with negligible emissions of CO2 (and other greenhouse gases and pollutants), at a cost we can afford. These sources of energy should be varied, to provide resilience, and limit the UK's exposure to imported fuels. The Climate Change Act and guidance from the Government's Climate Change Committee indicate that the electricity sector should be virtually de-carbonised by 2030. Even with extensive improvements in energy efficiency, this will require us to provide significant amounts of new, low carbon electricity generating capacity. For its size, the UK has some of the greatest tidal energy in the world. This energy could become one of many sources of additional renewable electricity for the UK. Power generated from tidal lagoons will be reliable and predictable, complementing other forms of renewable energy (wind, solar, etc). The Case for the Tidal Power Lagoon in Swansea This proposal provides the opportunity to establish the UK's first sizeable tidal lagoon generating electricity. The price per Mwh will be high, but this is to be expected when the first industrial scale plant is developed; as the industry becomes more established, and learns about this new technological application, costs will decrease significantly. The country needs to get going with such a scheme now, to start down the path of learning about exploiting tidal power through lagoons, so that this approach can be deployed more widely in the years ahead. Furthermore, the proposal has been developed with sensitivity to other stakeholders: the local community and economy, the local and global environment, etc. Consequently, I support this proposal, on economic, environmental and social grounds. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
CIOTEK Ltd
"I am making a representation on behalf of CIOTEK Ltd in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. CIOTEK Ltd is a business consultancy practice based in Gowerton, Swansea. We employ 5 individuals directly, and 5 on an associate basis. The business has been in operation for 10 years and delivers business support to other individuals and businesses (new and established) in the Swansea Bay area. We are particularly passionate and commercial developments in the area for the benefit of other businesses, the supply chain, local residents and visitors through increased profile, economic activity and employment opportunities. TLSB proposal will provide the following benefits to our business and the Bay area: Job creation The lagoon and visitor centre, as well as future plans to base manufacturing and support infrastructure for future lagoons developed by Tidal Lagoon Power Limited, will undoubtedly generate employment for individuals in the area and create opportunities for various commercial enterprises within the supply chain in Swansea Bay. As business advisors, we deal with both new and existing businesses in development, or improvement of, commercial operations – capitalising on opportunities to create and sustain successful enterprise in the area. The demand for various products/services generated as a result of increased opportunities through the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay will ultimately impact on our own business – increasing demand for our business support services to maximise potential. The focus on culture, sport and educational elements again will drive demand and interest which will ultimately impact job opportunities positively. Supply chain Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay explained their commitment to utilising a local supply chain in Chapter 22 of the ES. The evidence in this Chapter indicates that the introduction of this lagoon could increase demand for our services by 15% if the proposal is given consent. Technology & Innovation Based on the Cardiff Business School report presented in the appendix of the ES and anticipated inward investment to the Bay as a result of the Tidal Lagoon, it is envisaged that the region could be considered a central hub for research, innovation and technology developments. The additional developments in the City (Swansea University Campus, UWTSD planning expansion) and the potential Lagoon are all serving to put Swansea in an exceptionally admirable position in terms of providing opportunities to visitors and students. In conjunction with some of the University programmes on offer to the likes of commercial enterprises such as Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (i.e. SEACAMS – Centre for Applied Marine Science) there may be spin off benefits experienced and again promotion of Swansea as a centre of excellence for technology and innovation. To conclude, we are confident that our own organisation as well as other businesses around us will benefit from this proposal due to increased demand for services and promotion of Swansea Bay. The evidence in the ES highlights a plethora of opportunities which will outweigh any environmental impacts the project may have on the Bay. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Dr Pamela J Muirhead
"I am making a presentation as an individual in support of the Swansea Bay Tidal lagoon proposal. My professional background is in Biological Sciences as an Academic and Research Marine Cell Biologist/Physiologist.From 1980-1985 I was based at University College Swansea in the Department of Oceanography investigating the effects of Mercury on the cellular Reproductive development of edible marine bivalve molluscs in Swansea Bay. The research programme was initiated and funded by the Government through the Welsh Office following concerns for the high levels of toxic heavy metals being discharged into the Bay from local industries and their effect on the edible species of fauna. Mercury, at that time was being generated as a waste product from the Chloralkali plant at B.P chemicals in Britton Ferry and was discharged via a pipeline into the sea water.I understand that the subsequent publication of my report to the Welsh Office in 1985 along with my Ph.D.thesis in 1986 contributed to the closure of the plant during this decade. The eastern section of Swansea Bay and its coastal environs has endured an industrial legacy for over 200 years.The landscape has been successively scarred by Copper,Nickel,Iron and Steel manufacture and the sea water and sediment in the bay by pollution from their effluent discharges.In short, much of the coastline from Swansea Docklands to Port Talbot i.e. from the River Tawe eastwards cannot be described as attractive. Twenty years ago regeneration of the western dockland area began with the development of Swansea Marina and more recently the innovative, regenerative development of SA1 and the new Swansea University Science and Engineering campus. All, in my view, substantial improvements to this once unattractive, scarred area of Swansea Bay. I strongly believe that the proposed development for the establishment of a Tidal Lagoon with the capacity to generate clean electrical energy for the local community will enhance and improve this landscape with the added bonus of providing much needed employment for the local workforce both in its construction now and in the future. I also envisage that the Tidal Lagoon will provide positive benefits for the community by putting Swansea on the world map by being the centre for the first Tidal lagoon project on this scale in the world.This innovative showcase engineering and technology will attract investment and as it will lie adjacent to the new Swansea University Science and Engineering Campus will attract interest in energy based research and engineering development programmes in Tidal energy production and turbine innovation.Swansea University will have the potential to lead the world field. It will provide a wide range of attractive leisure activities for both the local community and the tourist industry. The planned hub building will provide educational facilities for local young people and has the potential to be a star attraction for the city. The long awaited plans for a marine aquarium may also be possible.It will attract Technology tourism by showcasing how clean, efficient tidal energy can be generated 24/7 by the ebb and flow of the 2nd highest tidal reach in the world.Other forms of renewable energy do not have this sustainable,weather independent capacity; namely wind and solar. Nuclear has its own intrinsic problems, namely long term radioactive pollution, disposal of radioactive waste, worker health issues and cost of commissioning and decommissioning. Dounreay is currently taking 30 years to decommission at a cost of £3 million to the public purse."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Expert Recruitment / Expert Group
"The law says that we must generate 15% of energy from renewable sources by 2020 and reduce carbon emissions by 750 million tonnes between now and 2030. That’s a real challenge for us as a nation but we now have the opportunity to use our greatest natural resource, the sea to help deliver these ambitious targets. As a local resident and branch manager of Expert Recruitment / Expert Group with some 30 staff, I believe passionately in our local area and actively support all initiatives that will boost our economy, environment and tourism industry. Swansea Bay needs developments like Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon if we are going to create a better and more prosperous future for generations to come. Saving over 236,000 tonnes of carbon per year, the lagoon will help reduce emissions while providing electricity for some 120,000 homes. That’s about 10% of Wales’ entire domestic energy needs being supplied by a clean, renewable form of energy. Importantly, the investment in Swansea as the first lagoon will mean that we have the opportunity to lead future developments and benefit from our first mover advantage. There will be a new industry created here in Swansea Bay that will lead to thousands of new jobs. Branch managers and local businesses like myself need this investment and we desperately need more jobs in the area for our young people who will have the chance to learn new skills and gain new qualifications. I am also really keen to see Swansea benefit from the sporting facilities that the lagoon will bring. Our children will have access to a world class location for cycling, swimming and sailing while older generations can enjoy walking and fishing. This is fantastic and will really help to put Swansea on the map with tourists coming from all parts of the UK and the world to visit the lagoon. Having met with representatives of the company behind the lagoon, I am confident that they really will deliver on this amazing project. They care about the people of Swansea and they care about our environment. Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon is an environmentally friendly development that will generate clean electricity, help reach Government targets, reduce carbon emissions and provide a fantastic sporting facility and visitor attraction for the public to enjoy. This is a once in a life time opportunity that can’t be missed. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
John Phillips
"I make this representation to express my personal views. I’m a retired labour market researcher. My home in West Cross has a panoramic view of Swansea Bay. I was born here. I support the TLSB project because it will bring many economic and cultural benefits to the area. We need renewable energy because the scientific evidence of climate change and global warming is overwhelming. I believe that our dependence on fossil fuels must be reduced because of the link with atmospheric CO2. We need cheap, clean electricity from a mix of sources and TLSB will provide this reliably and sustainably. More frequent extreme weather has been quite evident locally. The high tides and southern and southwesterly storms in Swansea Bay early in 2014 resulted in surges that overtopped coastal defences particularly in the promenade area close to County Hall. Surges also scoured large amounts of sand from the beach beneath those sea defences, exposing rubble that was previously concealed beneath the sand. Some damage also occurred further west on the shoreline. In contrast, the eastern shore protected next to the Swansea Port’s West Pier wall, seemed relatively unaffected by the storms, and the deep sand on the beach, and sand dunes remained in place. The sea wall of the proposed Tidal Lagoon will extend into the bay far beyond the port’s existing East and West Piers and is likely to offer further protection to the eastern bay shore. The shoreline enclosed within the Lagoon itself will be completely protected from tidal and storm surges by the Lagoon sea walls. So the Lagoon is likely to protect a large part of the coastline in the eastern bay area from future storm surges that are becoming more frequent. I attended the local TLSB Environmental Impact Assessment presentation in 2013 and was impressed with the comprehensive research and modelling results. The effects of TLSB were completely benign, there were no concerns that could not be mitigated in the design. In my view the Tidal Lagoon structure will be a visually attractive feature of the Bay, and it’s low profile will blend seamlessly with the existing landscape and horizon when seen from the shoreline, and from my hillside home in West Cross. The imaginative architecture, art and design features will provide interest and educational and leisure facilities will provide many opportunities for tourists, young people, students and all Swansea residents alike. TLSB will provide learning and cultural opportunities for primary secondary and tertiary education, and will link in with academic courses at education institutions. Many leisure activities will compliment and extend Swansea’s existing water sports, and be able to compliment the local historical tradition of shellfish industry. I believe there will be particular economic advantage in this project being the first of it’s kind in Wales. As the first of it’s kind it is likely to attract widespread interest to the local area from the world at large, both from tourism and from service and supply chain industries that wish to develop in a new expanding environment. This includes engineering suppliers of course. I believe the intention is for the South Wales area to become a hub for suppliers of a new tidal power industry and to develop to supply other similar projects in other parts of the UK and for export. The knowledge and expertise developed in Swansea and the region by the TLSB project will be invaluable in the UK and for export. It will be a catalyst for economic growth, sustainable employment and training both locally, throughout Wales and the UK. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Sheffield Forgemasters International
"Sheffield Forgemasters International (SFIL) consider that the Swansea Bay project will have a positive benefit on Manufacturing in the UK. Any project which claims that 65% of its expenditure will be in the UK, boosting a home-grown supply chain, cannot be ignored by British manufacturers. Adding to the fact that 10% of the UK's electricity can be generated from the tides must be a win-win situation for Wales and the UK as a whole. Sheffield Forgemasters as a company are very conscious of the environmental issues we are faced with today and can only see benefits in tidal power, utilising the natural sources which are available to us. Sheffield Forgemasters are very keen to support this project"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Unit Superheater Engineering Ltd
"I am making this representation on behalf of Unit Superheater Engineering Ltd (USE) in support of the Tidal Bay Swansea Lagoon proposal. We currently employ over 60 people in Swansea and USE has a long and proud history of manufacturing based in and around the city. We can trace our history back over 100 years generally being involved in the manufacture and development of large and complex components for the Power Generation industry. Being based in the Power Generation sector, we are keen to be involved in all forms of renewable energy and believe this development will be of assistance in securing jobs for our current workforce and supporting employment growth in the future. This being as a result of our historic markets in coal fired generation reducing over time and our re-positioning the business to supporting power generators using cleaner fuels. Naturally as our own business grows so will our demands on the local supply chain. Local companies provide us with raw materials for the manufacture of our goods and specialist engineering firms provide support services which are an integral part of our manufacturing processes. It is inevitable that as our demands increase so will job creation opportunities elsewhere in the supply chain. The proposal will create a development that will be viewed by a worldwide audience which can only bring benefit to Swansea and the surrounding region through increased publicity and interest from similar development opportunities being considered across the globe. As a predominantly manufacturing business the opportunity to be involved in the Tidal Bay Swansea Lagoon will provide an opportunity to advertise our goods to a wider audience and we are confident this will lead to other opportunities increasing the likelihood of further employment growth. It is clear that the development will also bring benefits through increased tourism and visitor numbers to the city together with increased leisure opportunities which will thereby encourage further business growth across the city. We understand that the development will be sympathetic to environmental concerns and we are supportive of this approach whilst understanding there will be impacts as a result. However, it is our conclusion that the overall benefits to the city, the region, businesses (including our won) and local people are far more positive than potential impacts and we therefore support this development. "
Sefydliadau Anstatudol
Wildlfowl & Wetlands Trust
"The Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust is pleased to see the proposal for a lagoon tidal power plant at Swansea Bay reach this stage of development and scrutiny. The company appears to have investigated likely environmental impacts of the scheme, and proposed suitable mitigation where impacts have been identified. We were please to see that net gain, i.e. improved wildlife value of the area, has been sought wherever possible. In our experience the company has worked hard on effective stakeholder engagement. We consider that the opportunities presented by the nation’s tidal resources should be explored as one of a suite of other options for low carbon energy production and that priority should be given to those projects and technologies that can be delivered without significantly and irreversibly damaging the natural environment. We have serious reservations about certain tidal range projects that have been proposed for the Severn Estuary by other companies previously, i.e. large barrage schemes that would have caused extensive environmental damage to sites within the estuary designated as being of high national and international conservation value. The current proposal contrasts with these by attempting to minimise environmental impacts at the outset. We consider this to be a positive and promising approach. If and when deployed, this scheme will offer unrivalled opportunities for learning about the efficacy of mitigation measures (for both wildlife and estuarine dynamics), as well as the performance of the technology in terms of energy output. It will be important to establish adequate monitoring protocols to ensure that mitigation measures are effective (particularly in relation to impacts on fish) and that the scheme can be adapted should mitigation projects significantly underperform. Crucially, we believe that lessons learn from this scheme, should it be deployed, should feed into the design of future projects using similar technology to further minimise environmental impacts. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Derek Morgan OBE DL
"Whilst supporting this project for all the evident benefits it would provide in terms of jobs, tourism and clean energy supply there are three more strategic issues to be highlighted. 1. Having been brought up in the Neath area and attended the local Grammar school Swansea was a focal point for all my leisure activities, from sport to entertainment. Having lived for the past 45 years in Bridgend, midway between Swansea and Cardiff, I can vouch for the fact that very few here look west to Swansea but rather east to Cardiff. The new Cardiff City Region will suck more and more investment, entertainment opportunities and political power to Cardiff and this project would help enormously to redress the power balance as between east and west Wales. 2. Wales as a nation has suffered for generations due to the predominance of the public sector. The imbalance has had a deleterious effect on business start ups, employment opportunities, wage levels and indeed educational standards. This project, led by a private sector organisation working in partnership with the public, educational and third sectors, will demonstrate how we can redress this imbalance to the good not only locally but more widely across South Wales. 3.Wales has very little to boast about in terms of world class developments and this project could provide the launchpad for our nation to be acknowledged as world leaders in Tidal Lagoon technology with Swansea the first of many such initiatives across the UK and beyond. As someone who has been involved in business at a reasonably high level for some 50 years, and who was involved in the first attempt to establish an international airport in South Wales, my support for this project is wholehearted and unconditional. Derek Morgan 1 -4 - 2014 "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Roger Evans
"TLSB Facts: Economy and Tourism The lagoon will contribute to the economy of Swansea Bay in multiple ways: ES Chapter 22 assesses that the lagoon will support 1850 full time equivalent full time jobs during the construction of the Project. 65 to 90 full-time job equivalents per annum through tourism will be leveraged from the 70,000 to 100,000 leisure trips per annum generated when the Project is operational. The operational phase of the Project after 2018 could further support an estimated £5m in extra output for Wales, and £2.2m in GVA annually for the region, supporting around 60 full-time equivalent jobs per annum and some £1.5 to £2.1 million of gross value added. A further At c.£756m of capital investment, the Project is estimated to lever close to £300m of regional spending spread over a three-year development period resulting in a potential £454m of additional output in Wales. Appendix 3 of the Planning Statement sets out TLSBs outline supply chain strategy, which aims to ensure the benefit of development remains in Swansea Bay through a commitment of 50% spend in Wales Appendix 2 of the Planning Statement sets out TLSBs outline education and skills strategy, which aims to ensure that the Project has the highest possible impact in terms of local sustainable development, jobs and skills. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Swansea Tidal Lagoon Industry Advisory Board
"TLSB Facts: Economy and Tourism The lagoon will contribute to the economy of Swansea Bay in multiple ways: • ES Chapter 22 assesses that the lagoon will support 1850 full time equivalent full time jobs during the construction of the Project. • 65 to 90 full-time job equivalents per annum through tourism will be leveraged from the 70,000 to 100,000 leisure trips per annum generated when the Project is operational. • The operational phase of the Project after 2018 could further support an estimated £5m in extra output for Wales, and £2.2m in GVA annually for the region, supporting around 60 full-time equivalent jobs per annum and some £1.5 to £2.1 million of gross value added. A further • At c.£756m of capital investment, the Project is estimated to lever close to £300m of regional spending spread over a three-year development period resulting in a potential £454m of additional output in Wales. • Appendix 3 of the Planning Statement sets out TLSBs outline supply chain strategy, which aims to ensure the benefit of development remains in Swansea Bay through a commitment of 50% spend in Wales. • Appendix 2 of the Planning Statement sets out TLSBs outline education and skills strategy, which aims to ensure that the Project has the highest possible impact in terms of local sustainable development, jobs and skills. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
WElsh Cycling
"I am making representation on behalf of Welsh Cycling in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. Welsh Cycling is the national governing body for cycling in Wales and is an internationally recognised organisation responsible for the administration and running of all six cycling disciplines of: Mountain Bike, Cyclo-Cross, Road, Track, BMX and Cycle Speedway competitions. Welsh Cycling is responsible for all aspects of the sport within Wales, from grass roots to Commonwealth Games teams. We have a network of over eighty cycling clubs throughout Wales working for the local needs of cycling; providing a social scene, events, rides and competitions. Participation in sport and activity After the successful London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and the promise of a sporting legacy (both nationally and internationally), Welsh Cycling is working with partners to maximise the surge of interest in the sport and activity of cycling and to help to deliver the Welsh Government’s and Sport Wales’ agenda and targets related to community sport and the physical activity levels of the nation. The priority for Welsh Cycling is to grow participation in the sport of cycling and increase our International and National sporting successes. Cycling can contribute to the Welsh Government’s agenda of having ‘An Active and inclusive Wales ‘particularly improving health and wellbeing and community cohesion. Cycling is an activity that people of all abilities can take part in throughout their life by providing skills for fun and transport, it provides sporting heroes as role models for those with talent or participation aspirations but also those who wish to volunteer in the sport. The proposal will assist in providing off road facilities for people to learn, take part recreationally and compete in cycling. Youth riding is critical in supporting the Sport Wales vision to ensure “Every child is hooked on sport for life’ There is an enduring requirement to provide traffic free cycle facilities for youth training and racing. Without venues then the identification and nurturing of talent in a safe traffic free environment it is not feasible, nor is the development of accredited clubs, young volunteers and the growth of young people in clubs; without these essential base blocks it is difficult to succeed downstream at the elite level. If people build competence and confidence in cycling in a safe environment they are more likely to continue to use their bicycles for purposeful (transport) which would link to the outcomes of the Active Travel Act. The venue lends itself to providing for competitive events for all ages if the provision of a BMX track and a road that had some incline was included this would increase the potential use of the site. In conclusion, we believe that the creation of an appropriate and accessible facility with opportunities to participate in cycling as a sport and recreation, both competitive and non-competitive, will assist the increase in participation. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Zest Cleaning Solutions
"We wish to represent Tidal Lagoon as we fully support the redevelopment of Swansea Bay in their quest to make a renewable energy for over 100,000 homes. We believe the intentions made by the company is the way forward for how energy in the U.K should be produced. The redevelopment of the Swansea Bay area will also help our business expand and help us to achieve new clients in the area. The increase of tourism will in turn increase property sakes hopefully help increase prices. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
National Assembly for Wales on behalf of Bethan Jenkins AM
"Strongly support this application, for the following reasons: * It will create energy in a renewable and innovative way; * It will create jobs in and around Swansea that will benefit the local economy; * The developers have proven that they are committed to working with and supporting the local community, through proposed initiatives and partnerships; * It will provide a flagship energy scheme for Wales as a whole, and help to create confidence and interest in the country and its economy; * It will provide a visitor attraction for Swansea; * It is supported by the local community."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
JCP Solicitors on behalf of Dan Morrissey (UK) Limited
"Dan Morrissey (UK) Limited (the Landowner) owns parcels of land within the scheme boundary (under Title Number CYM578745 and CYM178963). These parcels of land have development potential and parts are allocated for development in the Swansea Unitary Development Plan under Policy EC1(5) as general employment sites. The site is one of two strategic candidate sites in Swansea for such purpose. In addition to having development potential as an employment site, the site has development potential for both port related/University Campus purposes and the Landowner has been in discussions with other national and international businesses. In addition to these options, the site could also be suited for residential development in an area which is in need of further housing. The plan that has been submitted by Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB) shows that TLSB seek to acquire part of land owned by the Landowner for the purpose of creating a road. TLSB have not approached the Landowner to discuss this intended use of the land. Whilst the land has effectively been blighted by this proposed development it is suggested that an alternative route that is more suitable and having less impact on the Landowners use of the land is viable. An access road to the north of the Landowners site is considered more suitable not only for the Landowner but for the wider community and more in keeping with the UDP policy. If this development is to proceed it should be done with the minimum amount of disruption to land owners especially when viable alternatives are available. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Goodwin Internatioanl
"My name is Mark Howell, I am the Engineering Sales Manager for Goodwin International, based in Stoke-on-Trent. We are a British Engineering, family ran company with a direct focus on the Nuclear, Renewable and Power Generation, Defence, Structural and Petro-Chemical markets. We have been an established company for over 60 years and we have an excellent track record for supplying complete project solutions for the most complex and critical applications. We currently employ approx 400 personnel and our sister company, Goodwin Steel Castings, also based in Stoke-on-Trent employs an additional 125 personnel. Stoke-on-Trent was founded on coal, steel and ceramics; once the world capital of ceramics, Stoke-on-Trent has seen its pottery industry decline in employment from 70,000 pottery workers in the 1950s to less than 6000 today aggravated by the forced closure of the city's pits and of its steel works. The Goodwin family are dedicated to keeping engineering works in Stoke-on-Trent however to this the a steady flow of orders is required. We are currently working with three turbine manufacturers for the turbines to be installed at the site. Based on the engineering scope and quantity of components required the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon project offers a real potential to our company. Not only in the workforce for today but for the workforce of tomorrow. It will allow us to further reinvest in infrastructure of the company, increase our workforce further and expand our machining capabilities which will lead to even more project success. It offers the opportunity to our apprentices to work on complex milling work and see first hand how they are assisting in providing clean energy for their generation. Which will hopefully inspire them to continue in the chosen vocation as an engineer. Furthermore the project has lasting affects on British engineering, if the project succeeds their will be scope to repeat the project on further 5-6 sites in the U.K. Thus enabling our company to be key in supplying the U.K. with clean renewable energy and providing a legacy for generations to come. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Institute of Directors
"The Institute of Directors (IoD) has a membership of over 700+ across Wales, it's Director in Wales Robert Lloyd Griffiths, is a keen supportor of the proposed Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon. "It gives Wales a rare opportunity to help change the balance of the UK’s energy mix by harnessing the natural power of the sea while creating long-term opportunity for the Welsh economy and tourism industry. This £650 million investment has an important role to play in the regeneration of Swansea and, furthermore, has the potential to put Wales firmly on the global renewable energy map. Using combined proven technologies and civil engineering construction methodologies in an innovative configuration, Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon is a high profile, renewable energy project and has the capacity to create thousands of much needed jobs for local people as well as being a huge force for good for the Welsh economy - that has to be good news that is welcomed by local people and businesses alike”. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
National Joint Council for Engineering Construction
"The National Joint Council for Engineering Construction is a body which comprises engineering construction employers and trade unions. It plays a significant role in supporting the primary construction and ongoing repair and maintenance of large engineering projects mainly power generation as well as oil, chemicals and other types of processing plant. The most recent large project in Wales was the construction of the 2000MW CCGT Power Station in Pembroke built to time and budget for RWE under the auspices and with the support of the NJC. We have reviewed and considered the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay application and fully support it on the basis that it will re-generate the immediate local area, be a significant amenity for local people and those from further afield. In addidtion it will support local employment during construction and thereafter. The project as proposed is far reaching and environmental friendly and is to be commended. It has the full support of the members of the NJCECI members including the following employer associations ECIA, TICA, SELECT and the Unite and the GMB trade unions."
Sefydliadau Anstatudol
response has attachments
Porthcawl Environment Trust
"The following statement details Porthcawl Environment Trust’s (PET) objection to the above project. We are aware that the Planning Inspectorate are duty bound to follow due process. IT is well known that WWF have identified the Outer Bristol Channel as an A/B site of importance to the Harbour Porpoise as an Annex two species. In addition their habitat is listed in Annex 1 ie sandbanks. PET is also aware that the UK government have an infringement action pending by the EU Commission for non-compliance of Article 4(1) of the EU Habitiats Directive 92/43/EEC. We therefore consider it would be the duty of PET to notify the EU Commission (Infringement Unit) if any of the following actions were to take place:- a) The recommendation of the grant of the DCO for the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon by the planning inspectorate. b) The grant of a DCO that would allow Vibro and Percussion piling 24 hours a day in the Outer Bristol Channel area. c) If these actions were to be carried out it would be non-compliant with Article 5 (in exceptional cases) of the Habitats Directive 92/43/EEC Our objections would be based on the details listed above. In addition to this email copies of two letters will be forwarded to your department Letter 1. Infringement letter to the UK government detailing non compliance with its obligations under Article 4 (1) if the Habitiats Directove 92/43/EEC. See letter for further details, http://infrastructure.planningportal.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Brian-Saunders-Letter-1.pdf Letter 2. A letter from Garcia Burgess No appropriate EIA has been carried out. Tidal Lagoon PLC have not applied to the EU Commission for an EU Wildlife Derogation Licence. http://infrastructure.planningportal.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Brian-Saunders-Letter-2.pdf If the links do not work automatically please copy and paste into your browser."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Professor Michael Phillips
"I am making a personal representation as Professor of Coastal Geomorphology at the University of Wales: Trinity Saint David in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB) proposal. I have extensive knowledge of shoreline change in response to physical processes and have made >100 contributions to the academic literature. Contributions to coastal and ocean policies include: the Rio +20 World Summit; the Climate, Oceans and Security Working Group of the UN Global Forum on Oceans, Coasts and Islands; UNESCO; EU Maritime Spatial Planning; and Welsh Government Policy on Marine Aggregate Dredging. Engagements with coastal research agendas include the German Cluster of Excellence in Marine Environmental Sciences, the Portuguese Department of Science and Technology, the Maltese Government and the US Coastal Education and Research Foundation, amongst others. In my opinion, the TLSB proposal will provide many local, regional and national benefits which are detailed under the following headings: Renewable Energy The use of a natural predictable source of energy is a major consideration for justifying this development. I am on the marine energy task group of the Low Carbon Research Institute working on the feasibility of tidal stream generators and in my opinion, TLSB has much greater potential. Climate change The TLSB proposal will help meet European, UK and Welsh Government commitments to a low carbon economy. Recent storms have shown the vulnerability of the Welsh coastline to major events and such occurrences are predicted to increase during the twenty-first century. I have published sea level trends for the Bristol Channel and Severn Estuary predicting increases and linking these to climatic conditions such as the North Atlantic Oscillation. In my opinion, the tidal lagoon will modify the dominant incoming southwest wave climate, dissipating storm wave energy before it reaches the shoreline. It will also reduce the shoreline impact of refracted south-easterly waves. Therefore, with increasing sea levels and storm intensities, TLSB will provide a valuable coastal defence for Swansea Bay. Environment TLSB will interfere with the anti-clockwise sediment regime in Swansea Bay resulting in accretion along the Jersey Marine beach. This may lead to a modification of dredging activities in Swansea Bay, but in my opinion, this impact will be minimal and TLSB will not have an adverse effect on coastal morphology. New ecosystems within the lagoon will offer aquaculture opportunities while various physical and natural environment research opportunities will help attract talent to the region’s two universities. TLSB will offer new experiences of the coastal environment helping improve the population’s health and wellbeing. Employment Coastal tourism represents 80% of the industry and TLSB will attract tourists for its uniqueness and technology, leading to increased employment in Swansea. TLSB will also generate regional employment in manufacturing with new research leading to spinout company formation. In conclusion, I believe that TLSB will make Swansea world leading in tidal lagoon technologies. Providing reliable low carbon energy, it will improve health and wellbeing, the economy and importantly coastal defence against climate change. If needed, I will be pleased to provide more detailed responses. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Swansea Biodiversity Partnership
"We are concerned that the tidal lagoon will be damaging to local habitats and wildlife, in particular to the SSSIs at Crymlyn Burrows and Blackpill by interrupting the natural processes which sustain their character. In operation the lagoon may be damaging to fish and to Cetacians, including Harbour Porpoise, through physical damage in the turbines. These issues are not effectively addressed in the impact assessment."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Welsh Liberal Democrats
"The Welsh Liberal Democrats support the development of tidal range power in the Severn estuary and Bristol Channel, using a range of technologies, as outlined by the Liberal Democrat Severn Tidal Forum. As such, we welcome the proposals for the tidal lagoon in principle. In 2009, the Liberal Democrats Severn Tidal Forum produced a paper entitled ‘A Tidal Solution – The Way Forward’. The report endorsed a mixed approach involving a range of technologies to best utilise the energy potential of the Severn. In advocating an incremental approach, the paper called for the development of a pilot lagoon to the seaward side of a potential Shoots barrage and called for research and development work to be done into a tidal reef from Aberthaw to Minehead. These recommendations have been adopted as policy by the Liberal Democrats federally. In this context we are pleased that the tidal lagoon project is being put forward for consideration. We believe that the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon represents a positive first step towards maximising low carbon energy generation from the Severn Estuary. If the Lagoon is judged to be environmentally safe by Natural Resources Wales and the Planning Inspectorate, and is proven not have adverse effects on the surrounding environment after construction/operation, the Welsh Liberal Democrats see no reason why the concept could not be extended to new projects in Welsh waters. There are still a number of environmental concerns surrounding this project which must be addressed as the Lagoon progresses through the planning and licencing system. These include, but are not limited to: impact on marine geomorphology; shipping and access to Swansea docks and surrounding rivers; fish mortality; water quality and sewage management. Provided that these issues are suitably dealt with, we would welcome this project’s potential to radically improve Wales’ renewable energy generation capacity, and bring greater economic development to the Swansea Bay region. In conclusion, we believe there to be a number of benefits within the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon proposals. If the above concerns are suitably resolved during the development process we believe that the Lagoon will provide the template for the roll out of further renewable energy infrastructure in Wales."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Burlais Primary School
"Burlais Primary School is a large primary school which was formed in 2012 when Cwmbwrla and Manselton Primary Schools amalgamated. The school is located in a densely populated, urban area within the City and County of Swansea. It currently has limited access to outdoor facilities. As part of the school’s curriculum as defined by Welsh Government pupils have to have access to a curriculum which promotes Education For Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship (ESDGC) - July 2008. There is a need to manage and organise the curriculum to include ESDGC ideas and experiences. Therefore, in the overview of all schemes of work, appropriate opportunities for the development of ESDGC have been identified. It is through the development of ESDGC the pupils develop their knowledge and understanding of the key concepts:- • Interdependence - understanding how people, the environment and the economy are linked at all levels from local to global. • Citizenship and stewardship – recognising the importance of taking individual responsibility and action to make the world a better place. • Needs and rights – understanding our own basic needs and about human rights and the implications for the needs of future generations of actions taken today. • Diversity – understanding, respecting and valuing both human diversity – cultural, social and economic and biodiversity. As part of the Common Inspection Framework Estyn would question whether pupils have opportunities to develop and extend awareness of ESDGC and whether they understand what it is. They would also question whether a school has adequate resource to deliver the curriculum for ESDGC and whether its staff are sufficiently trained? It is difficult for us to meet the demands placed upon us to deliver these requirements. We recognise that the ethos of our school is as influential as the taught curriculum and we seek to nurture positive attitudes towards the environment and sustainable living. We have an Eco Committee which has helped to develop and promote the ethos of ESDGC through positive actions in and around the school and the local community. However, this alone is not sufficient and there are clear implications for staff training, resourcing and timetabling of activities to promote learning in this area. As a school we feel that the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon Project would enhance pupils’ learning in this area and would welcome the opportuntity to be a partner within this project. The Tidal Lagoon will enable us to have access to a powerful, innovative teaching resource which would clearly demonstrate to our pupils how our natural resources can be used as a source of renewable, sustainable energy. The expertise of those involved in the project, for example the Education Officer, would have a positive impact on promoting positive attitudes to the environment and global awareness. This is essential if pupils are to value it and understand their role in safeguarding it for the future. As professionals we feel that many of our pupils do not have access to a quality environment during their leisure time. The Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay would provide families with free access to opportunities for learning outside school hours. It would be a place to promote physical activities, access to open spaces, play and quality family time together. These experiences will ultimately impact on pupils’ ability to perform in school. There has been research undertaken into the ‘significant life experiences’ that determine our connection to the environment, and our attitudes and values, reveals that positive direct contact or ‘first-hand’ experience has the greatest impact (NFER, 2004). Evidence also points to the fact that children gain their most powerful understanding of their natural environment through exploring it for themselves” (WAG Out of Classroom Learning – October 2007) The Tidal Lagoon Project would enable us to make these connections for our children and will play a significant role indeterming their attitudes and values to the world around them. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Charlotte Tonge
"I believe that the tidal lagoon will be a very positive project for Swansea Bay. As a Swansea resident, i believe it'll create new jobs, new opportunities for local businesses, artists etc. Plus i also think it's a wonderful concept from an environmental point of view, from the vast information received at numerous stages from the 'Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay' team i don't believe the project will have a huge negative impact on the environment considering the power it will be generating/harnessing from our wonderful tides. As we have the 2nd largest tide in the world i think we'd be foolish not to harness this free and reliable power source and use it to our advantage. Swansea Bay seems a logical choice for a number of reasons - i have no doubt that it will be a positive change to Swansea Bay. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
David Tonge
"I believe that the tidal lagoon will be a very positive project for Swansea Bay. As a Swansea resident, i believe it'll create new jobs, new opportunities for local businesses, artists etc. Plus i also think it's a wonderful concept from an environmental point of view, from the vast information received at numerous stages from the 'Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay' team i don't believe the project will have a huge negative impact on the environment considering the power it will be generating/harnessing from our wonderful tides. As we have the 2nd largest tide in the world i think we'd be foolish not to harness this free and reliable power source and use it to our advantage. Swansea Bay seems a logical choice for a number of reasons - i have no doubt that it will be a positive change to Swansea Bay. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Grwp Llandrillo Menai
" I am making a representation on behalf of Gr?p Llandrillo-Menai (GLLM) in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB) proposal. GLLM is a Further Education college in North Wales providing employment for over 2,000 staff, across 14 sites and in excess of 34,000 student enrolments. The College is an economic driver of the local economy with a regional network of vocational centres of excellence and a hub of partnership activity with LEAs, Schools and Higher Education. The College prides itself as an agent of regeneration in its communities through the continuous modernisation of curriculum and direct dialogue with local authorities, business and industry. The College has reorganised its employer engagement and currently has £11m of work based learning contracts and offers assessment and training to 4000 apprentices; these include apprentices for the nuclear and wind industries. With 7,500 full time students, a £75,000,000 per annum turnover and approximately £11.5 million other income, the College is a provider of excellent teaching, learning and an exemplar deliverer of bilingual education. Through College facilities such as the Energy Centre in Llangefni, Wind Turbine Training Centre (WTTC) and Renewable Energy & Sustainability Centre for Wales (RESCW) in Rhos-on-Sea, each attracting National Skills Academy status, GLLM is proactively engaged with training for sustainability and the up-skilling of the low carbon energy workforce in North Wales and the Energy Island catchment area. GLLM believes that the TLSB proposal will help Wales and the UK meet its obligations to generate low carbon electricity while offering a stable transition to a sustainable Wales. The benefit to the local economy will be immediate; however, the wider social and environmental benefits will be long term. Creating a security of supply from low carbon technologies is an important factor to ensure that Wales develops a sustainable economy and meets the needs of its communities. The TLSB Planning Statement, Section 1.2.3, highlights that the proposed development will play a major part in meeting the 7TWh per annum target for Wales by 2020, the 40 percent target from marine generation and 9 percent of Wales’ annual domestic demand. Investing in a mature technology and predictable energy source offers a stable solution for the coming years whereas continued reliance on fossil fuel is somewhat uncertain. Section 3.3.1.6 clearly states the aspiration of TLSB to source over 50 percent of manufactured components from local industry and to support educational and skills programmes in an attempt develop the local workforce. The design approach adopted by TLSB demonstrates their understanding and commitment to sustainability with wider social and cultural benefits highlighted in Sections 3.9.1.3 & Appendix 1 where urban expeditions planned for; artists, writers, scientists, geographers and engineers will add benefit to the local community. The projection that 1,850 jobs will be created during construction and 72 full time permanent jobs, in Section 6.3.1.55, is an important economic prospect for the community and TLSBs emphasis on a, ‘scheme of local educational engagement and training to ensure local people are employed in the construction and operation of the project’, is a welcome statement of their commitment to actively engage in the skills agenda for the local area and in keeping with the regional key priorities, Section 7.2.2.3. The potential for the co-location of associated development is also welcome and an opportunity for economic growth in the region that would lead to local skills development and training requirement in other sectors, Section 7.2.3.5. With reference to the, ‘Wales Spatial Plan: People Places Future’, in Section7.2.2, it is pleasing to see that the project fully supports one of the key priorities to develop and integrated skills strategy for the region through school, college and university engagement programmes that will educate young people about the lagoon and engineering opportunities. Some of the secondary opportunities of the project are themselves extremely important factors such as tourism, leisure, recreation and, one opportunity that resonates in North Wales is, the opportunity for flood protection, Section 7.2.3.4. The Educational Programme outlined in Appendix 2 of the Planning Statement emphasises the importance placed by TLSB on early engagement with the educational fraternity through school, vocational training, FE College and academic based research at Universities with STEM activities and work experience. Early engagement with the skills agenda is an important element of ensuring that the knowledge and skills of the local workforce are developed in time for the construction and operational phases of the project. Developing the right knowledge and skills of the workforce requires time and detailed discussion to ensure that candidates are fully prepared for the job opportunities that arise. GLLM also welcomes the consideration given on up-skilling of the current local workforce and those currently not in employment, education or training. The sponsors of TLSB TidalLagoonPower.com are already engaged with this College and other stakeholders in North Wales. In conclusion, GLLM believe that the long term impact of the project will be immense for the whole of Wales and TLSBs proposal would lead the way in tidal energy developments for the UK. As an FE training provider working closely with the power sector in North Wales, GLLM would be keen to learn from the experiences and relationships developed from the Swansea Bay project. Having read the detailed evidence provided in the Planning Statement, GLLM fully support the approach taken for community engagement while addressing the key priorities of the region and meeting the values and practices of sustainable development. Although the benefits of the TLSB development may be small for GLLM in the short term, the long term impact would be considerable if a similar scheme were developed in north Wales. The Planning Statement clearly demonstrates the regional benefits of the Tidal Lagoon development, however, GLLM see the Welsh economy, communities and environment benefitting in the long term and outweigh the short term environmental impact on the Bay. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Joan Nixon
"I believe that the tidal lagoon will be a very positive project for Swansea Bay. As a Swansea resident, i believe it'll create new jobs, new opportunities for local businesses, artists etc. Plus i also think it's a wonderful concept from an environmental point of view, from the vast information received at numerous stages from the 'Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay' team i don't believe the project will have a huge negative impact on the environment considering the power it will be generating/harnessing from our wonderful tides. As we have the 2nd largest tide in the world i think we'd be foolish not to harness this free and reliable power source and use it to our advantage. Swansea Bay seems a logical choice for a number of reasons - i have no doubt that it will be a positive change to Swansea Bay. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Monkstone Cruising and Sailing Club
"Monkstone Cruising and Sailing Club (MCSC) is a long established (est 1957) sailing and fishing club operating from its marina in the River Neath. MCSC is the only marina facility in the Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council area and provides the only safe base for leisure sailing and sea fishing in the area. Small boats sail in an out of the marina at all times making their way to and from Swansea Bay. MCSC believe that the erection of the proposed tidal lagoon in Swansea Bay will seriously impact on the activities and viabilities of this locally supported club. The main areas of concern are: 1. The wave pattern experienced at the entrance to the River Neath will be dangerously confused due to wave echo from the lagoon wall. This may well make entry into the River Neath catastrophically dangerous for small craft in a way that it is not at present. 2. The building of the lagoon wall extending out into Swansea Bay effectively extending the River Neath will increase the level of silting within the river and also within the MCSC marina itself. This may increase dredging costs to an unaffordable level. 3. At present access to the MCSC marina is possible for 2 hours either side of high water which allows for sailing/fishing within Swansea Bay over the high water period. Due to the effective increased distance to get to clear water for sailing and fishing from the MCSC marina the time availability to use Swansea Bay over the high water will be severely reduced making it unacceptable for many users. It is likely that the above concerns will result in such a loss of membership at MCSC and consequential effect on finances that the club will not survive. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mr Dereck J Roberts
"I am generally supportive of the application but I believe that it should be conditional on relocating or extending the Dwr Cymru Waste Water Plant long outfall as this would lead to further improvement to the water quality in Swansea Bay. This would, in turn, improve the secondary tourist related benefits in the proposed scheme."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mumbles Development Trust
" I am making a representation on behalf of the Mumbles Development Trust in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. MDT is a community organisation started in 1999 as an initiative to promote active citizenship and self-help community projects as a not for profit limited liability company with educational charitable aims. MDT has a membership of over 100 individuals, organisations and local businesses. Over the years, MDT has established many projects that have made a real difference to the community. Art, Culture and History have formed the backbone of MDT, having close links with Oystermouth Historical Association and Oriel Bach Art Gallery. With the background of the Mumbles Train and Oyster Industry MDT feels the area is ready to realise the potential of these links as a tourist destination. The Trust is also involved in promoting Welsh food through its monthly Produce Market and actively plays a part in looking after the environment. MDT is based in Mumbles, marking the beginning of the Gower Peninsula’s coastline and the Gower Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Mumbles boasts some of the best views of Swansea Bay and is home to one of Swansea’s main tourist attractions, Oystermouth Castle. MDT are fully in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay project because it will produce 400 GWh of clean, predictable electricity annually that is enough to power approximately 121,000 homes which is more than Swansea’s annual domestic electricity use. The project will not only bring about improvement and regeneration to the Swansea dockland area that it is immediately located within but through its development it will provide a catalyst for inward investment that we hope would create further development and regeneration of Swansea city centre and across the whole of Swansea Bay including Mumbles. MDT is excited at the proposal by TLSB and encourages the development of a scheme that would allow members of Mumbles and wider Swansea Bay community to have the opportunity to purchase cheaper locally produced electricity. MDT encourages amenities and tourist developments in Mumbles and believes that the TLSB visitors centre and general public amenities will be a huge attraction for additional visitors to the Swansea Bay region and anticipates that this would increase tourist numbers for Mumbles having a positive impact for our local businesses and projects such as the Mumbles Local Produce Market. The TLSB is more than just a power generation project because of the additional facilities and associated activities proposed. These reflect and support the aims and objectives of our organisation, such as: • Boating Centre and associated sport facilities – offer a facility to promote healthier living and participation in sports such as sailing; swimming; rowing; triathlon; walking and running, thus providing a platform for younger generations to become interested in sport. • Hatchery building - MDT fully supports TLSB’s aims proposed in chapter 22 of the Environmental Statement for development of mariculture opportunities. MDT encourages the re-introduction of native oysters within Swansea Bay having initiated the annual Mumbles Oyster and Seafood Festival in 2012 to celebrate the native Oyster and all that the Mumbles, Gower and Swansea Bay area have to offer. Conclusion: MDT fully supports the TLSB proposal. It represents a much needed catalyst for the regeneration and further improvement of Swansea Bay that we anticipate will have a positive effect on business and tourism of Mumbles. "
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Pembrokeshire South East Energy Group
"Pembrokeshire South East Energy Group is a voluntary organisation which is recognised by HMRC as a Charity (No XT13548). The Charities objects are:- 1) to promote, for the benefit of the public, all forms of energy conservation and all forms of sustainable, renewable energy an 2) To advance the education of the public in the need for the conservation of energy, and the desirability of all forms of sustainable renewable energy. We have long supported the need to harness the power of the sea to create electricity. This project would provide electricity for an anticipated 120 years. The CO2 savings over that time would be enormous. During construction it is anticipated that jobs created would be 1,850 full-time equivalent with 60-90 long-term jobs. The developers plan to access and as much local expertise and experience as possible. This would prove a great investment both in Swansea and South Wales. Members and friends of PSEEG fully support this forward thinking project as a step towards reducing the UK's CO2 emissions. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Thomas Thorpe
"Dear Sir or Madam, I have over 35 years’ experience in the energy industry (nuclear, offshore oil and gas, and renewables (particularly wave and tidal). I am a former member of the group that provided technical support to the (then) Department of Energy’s Chief Scientist. I first analysed the Tidal Lagoon concept in 2002 when the technology was being promoted by Tidal Electric. My report showed that there was considerable technical detail missing but that the concept (as applied to a test case in Swansea Bay) looked economically promising. I then assessed the scheme in 2006 as part of the UK’s Foresight Marine Panel and found that the technology still needed technical refinement but that it was still promising economically (certainly compared to other renewables, including the Severn Barrage). More importantly, the Panel found that this technology offered significant benefits as a form of coastal protection for low-lying regions around the Severn Estuary (specifically Bridgewater Bay in Somerset). With the experience I have in this area, I would like to support the development of a Tidal Lagoon system in the Swansea Bay area for three main reasons: • In light of the extreme flooding in Somerset over this last winter and the increasing tendency to flooding in many regions due to climate change, I think that the coastal protection benefits offered by tidal lagoons will become of growing importance. • I have looked at the openly available work being carried out by Tidal Lagoon Power. It would appear that they and their associates are addressing this technology in sufficient detail to overcome the technical caveats that were in my earlier reports, leading to greater confidence in the technical and economic aspects. • If, as I expect, the economics of Tidal Lagoons are proved to be attractive, the experience gained in deploying a scheme in Swansea Bay could be the base from which to engage a significant export market. Copies of the reports referred to above can be obtained free of charge from me. Thank you for the opportunity to contribute to your deliberations. Yours sincerely, Thomas Thorpe "
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Van Oord UK ltd.
"I am making a representation on behalf of Van Oord UK Ltd in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. Van Oord UK Ltd is the UK subsidiary of Van Oord Dredging and Marine Contractors, a specialist marine (EPC) contractor involved in construction of marine infrastructure in the Ports, Oil & Gas and Offshore Wind sectors. We employ 55 people in our UK organisation and serve Government customers such as the Environment Agency and Natural Resources Wales. We have embarked on a development process that will bring a new dimension to building breakwaters and flood protection. This method that saves the use of overseas natural resources and will create local jobs during construction. The TLSB proposal will provide the following benefits to our business and the Swansea Bay area: Job creation - Van Oord will need a large number of crew and labour for our marine plant (>300) that will be used to build the lagoon wall and a significant number (70%) will be sourced locally. In addition to that we envisage using local vessel owners to provide us with the necessary equipment support on the water. Supply chain - In the construction phase, the local economy will benefit from our operations. Van Oord is used to employing local SME, for example on our now 15 year old framework agreement with the EA , we have a target of using at least 25% local SME’s which we continue to meet successfully. Tourism - This project is a first of type in the world, and as such will attract visitors from all over the world. We as an organisation would certainly bring our potential Clients to Swansea to see this ground breaking technology and we believe that there will be a much wider interest from other technology sectors. As a business we will benefit from this project as it will show our skills in building complex marine structures as EPC contractor and this allow us to further our Alternative Energy business. For comparison, when we entered the Offshore Wind market years ago with a similar strategy, it allowed turnover growth with some 20%. Summarizing, we believe that we will benefit from the environmentally friendly construction methodology because of the expected increased interest in Tidal lagoons all over the world, and our technology in particular. This conclusion is based on experience in similar fields. Moreover, we believe that the wider Swansea area will benefit from this initiative, and that those benefits outweigh environmental impacts this project may have. "
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Cambrensis Ltd
"I am making this representation as an Associate on behalf of Cambrensis Ltd – Risk and Sustainability Consultants, in support of the proposal by Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB) Until December 2010, I was Chief Environmental Science Adviser at Welsh Government, with particular interest in climate change mitigation and renewable energy supplies. I consider that the TLSB proposal will provide the following benefits to Swansea and Wales 1. Renewable energy generation and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction The proposal to build a tidal lagoon at this location for energy generation would represent a significant advance in establishing the credibility of tidal power for energy generation. In particular, the scale of the proposal will be an important step in demonstrating the reliability and integrity of the structures in operating in challenging marine and weather conditions. In addition, the operation of turbines and associated equipment will provide an exemplar of this technology for future projects. Unlike some renewable technologies such as wind turbines, hydroelectricity and solar power, tidal energy provides a predictable energy source that is not affected by weather conditions. For example in cold anti-cyclonic conditions in winter, the levels of wind, hydro and solar generation can be small, at a time when energy demand is high. Tidal lagoons provide a reliable, predictable source of electricity, which can be matched to energy demand during the day, season or year. To indicate the significance of the project to meeting Wales’ electricity needs, the net annual generation of 480GWh would add very substantially to the total renewable energy generation in Wales – 2159GWh in 2011, and produce a significant part of the domestic electricity consumption of 5287GWh in 2011. This level of generation would have significant effect in reducing carbon dioxide emissions in Wales, in line with Welsh Government’s target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 3% annually from 2011. Successful implementation of the proposal at this scale would provide a strong basis for replicate schemes at other sites around the Welsh and UK coastline 2. Environmental Impacts As designed, the project minimizes environmental impacts by careful selection of the site in an area of low sensitivity. Selection of this site with a large tidal range represents an important test case of maximizing the environmental benefits of the scheme in comparison with negative impacts. 3. Economic regeneration As estimated by the Welsh Business School, the project would provide a substantial local stimulus to manufacturing and service companies during construction given the scale of investment that is required. In addition, the operation of the power station together with the opportunities for tourism and recreation should provide a large stimulus to the local economy in the Swansea area. "
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CEMEX UK Operations Limited
"Representation 1.0 Introduction 1.1 CEMEX was founded in 1906 and is now a global building solutions company and leading supplier of cement, ready mixed concrete and aggregates. In the UK, CEMEX also provides asphalt, flooring solutions, concrete blocks and railway sleepers, bespoke pre cast and concrete blocks. 1.2 CEMEX has grown from a small local company into one of the top global companies in the world. Following a number of successful acquisitions, CEMEX now has more than 40,000 employees worldwide and has a turnover of around US $15billion. In the UK , CEMEX generates around £775 million in annual sales. 1.3 CEMEX is the market leader in ready mixed concrete and a leading supplier of mortars and screeds and operates a comprehensive national supply network to ensure that quality materials and services are available to customers locally. Nationwide the company operates over 230 concrete mixing plants to ensure efficient delivery to virtually any location in the UK. 1.4 With 63 quarries and a fleet of modern vessels supplying marine aggregates, CEMEX is a major provider of crushed rock, sand and gravel for a wide range of construction applications. 1.5 CEMEX offers a complete range of market leading concrete mixes designed to meet every application. 2. Representations 2.1 The Aggregate wharf and Readymix plant are important facilities for CEMEX within the South Wales market. From this location we supply the City and the wider market with essential building materials including ready mixed concrete, sand and gravel. 2.2 Whilst it is noted that the readymix plant and the wharf are unaffected by the proposals the access will be. It is essential that free and unhindered access is maintained to the readymix plant and to the docks. 2.3 The wharf plays an important part in receiving supplies of aggregates and sand to supply the readymix plant and the wider market. The ability to maintain levels of operational capacity and supply from the wharf and readymix plant to its current and future market is necessary for CEMEX to continue to operate in this market. "
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Design Commission for Wales
"The Design Commission for Wales commented on the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay Project through iterative consultation via Design Review Meetings throughout 2013 focussing on the energy generation, coastal aspects, landside ambitions, land ownership, access arrangements and associated design issues including public realm and architecture. The Commission is broadly supportive of the TLSB but wishes to ensure its comments on key matters, which are material and which have been set out in written Design Review Reports, are fully considered. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Jac Bastian
"This project offers Swansea the opportunity to lead the way in transitioning our energy supply, our economy and our society from one based on fossil fuels to one based on renewable sources of energy. With recent extreme weather events, at home and abroad, and the release of the latest IPCC report reminding us of the perils of inaction on climate change this transition is vital if we are to avoid the most catastrophic effects of climate change. In an age of austerity and high unemployment, investment in green jobs is a crucial way in which we can boost our local economies that have been suffering the consequences of job losses, real term wage cuts and an attack on the welfare state. This project can bring much needed skilled jobs to the local area as well as set an example that investment in green infrastructure can strengthen the economy whilst decarbonising our energy supply. As Education Coordinator for People & Planet running workshops in schools and colleges, one of the main barriers young people face to taking action on climate change is a skepticism and pessimism about solutions and alternative energy sources. The educational focus of this project would provide a practical and exciting tool for students in local schools to see how society can function without fossil fuels. Showing such positive solutions to the climate crisis is vital in educating and inspiring young people to engage with this pressing global issue as active global citizens. It could also serve to work within key curriculum areas such as citizenship, PSE, Geography and the sciences. Students will have the opportunity to learn about green technologies and sustainable engineering projects which, with the onset of climate change, are vital skills for students' future employment. As well as inspiring students to pursue studies and employment in sustainable engineering, it will also inspire students to engage with the political, social and environmental issues surrounding climate change. These will all be vital assets to Welsh society and the Welsh economy in the future. Whilst fossil fuel companies and politicians seem set on furthering the UK's dependency on dangerous and extreme forms of fossil fuel extraction such as hydraulic fracturing and underground coal gasification this project is an opportunity to put forward an alternative vision for our society. With proposals for underground coal gasification for both the Swansea Bay area and the Loughour Estuary this project is vital in highlighting how our natural resources can be used in a sustainable way to support a strong local economy. Long term investments in green technologies stand in stark opposition to dangerous, polluting and short term fossil fuel extraction that offer little to the local economy and community. This project will not only supply us with clean energy but also bolster the local economy, create educational opportunities for local students, create social spaces and allow Swansea to lead by example in transitioning our economy in light of the looming climate crisis. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Jonathon Porrit
"I’m delighted to have this opportunity to express my enthusiastic support for the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay energy generation project. I have been a supporter of tidal energy from the Severn Estuary for more than 40 years. As Chair of the Sustainable Development Commission between 2000 and 2009, I was responsible for commissioning a major piece of work on the feasibility of a tidal barrage across the Severn. The Commission unanimously supported the idea of such a barrage. I have remained actively involved in a number of related initiatives since then. Perhaps the most critical aspect of this proposal relates to the UK’s long-term energy security. Though I have little time for those who bang on about ‘the lights going out’, there’s no doubt that we face a big challenge by the end of this decade. The idea of some kind of ‘nuclear renaissance’ filling that gap is a work of total fiction; even the energy companies most closely involved acknowledge that no new nuclear will come on stream until around 2025. What’s more, I am far less sanguine about the ‘fracking bonanza’ that is apparently about to come to our rescue: what fracked gas there is will be a lot more expensive, a lot harder to develop, and a lot more short-lived than most would have us believe. The prospect of the Tidal Lagoon in Swansea Bay delivering its first electrons into the Grid by around 2018 is therefore massively persuasive. We need our energy to be both secure and low-carbon, and the Swansea Lagoon certainly ticks that box. Its 240MW will make a major contribution to this country’s ambitious decarbonisation target. It’s exciting to think that this should be just the first of a number of lagoon projects in the UK, with a combined potential to provide up to 10% of our total electricity. And with more than 50 sites around the world identified as suitable for similar lagoons, this could be an important export industry for the UK. What’s more, that benefit will be delivered with a very low total environmental footprint. I reviewed the non-technical Summary Document from the overall Environmental Statement, and was impressed to see just how much thought has gone into both the necessary mitigation strategies (providing alternative spawning sites for herring, for instance) and the huge potential for new habitat creation and other (very substantial) ecological benefits. Finally, I have to say that I am hugely impressed at the quality of the consultation process that has already been undertaken in getting the proposal this far. The extent of engagement with a very wide range of stakeholders in this case speaks volumes for the developer’s intention of taking those communities with them rather than imposing something upon them. This really does appear to provide one of those elusive win-win-win examples of sustainable development at its best (providing significant social, economic and environmental benefits), and one must hope that it prospers mightily as a result. Jonathon Porritt, April 2014"
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Kevin Kearle
"I am writing to express my support for the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay project as a current resident of Langland, originally born in Neath and brought up in Sandfields Port Talbot. I own a number of let properties throughout Swansea Bay including Swansea Marina, Brynmill, Sketty and Port Talbot and have run a number of successful companies based in Swansea, having employed 100s of people. I think the project should be given the go ahead because of the enormous benefits it would bring to Swansea in addition to the production of clean, reliable electricity from our great natural resource, the tide. The residents of Swansea are ready and want huge regeneration of the city centre and surrounding area, feeling that they always miss out to Cardiff. I believe that the construction of the tidal lagoon will be a catalyst for further investment in and regeneration of Swansea making it a great city that people are prepared to drive beyond Cardiff to visit. I am encouraged to read that in the Environmental Statement that the construction of the lagoon will create nearly 2000 jobs a year and further O&M jobs plus additional jobs in relation to the leisure activities proposed as part of the overall lagoon complex. I hope that these jobs are sourced locally, particularly from areas in Swansea such as Neath Port Talbot, an area where the younger generation need real support through apprenticeships and training programmes to get into work. I and my two children really enjoy all our Swansea coastline has to offer and regularly fish, kayak, paddle board and take the motor boat out into Swansea Bay. I would love to see more local people taking the opportunity to enjoy our beautiful coastline and participate in water based activities even in an enclosed lagoon. It would be great to see large sporting events hosted by Swansea bringing with it additional sports tourists spending their money in Swansea and surrounding area. This project should definitely be granted permission to go ahead. It would be a crime to deprive Swansea of the opportunity to become an amazing city once again that inspires its residents to get more involved in sport and water related recreation whilst leading the world in innovative projects. "
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Maritime Quarter Residents
"The Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay plans have received a positive reception from local residents and the Maritime Quarter Residents’ Association (MQRA) supports the application as we believe that it makes a welcome contribution to the Swansea Bay region in a number of ways: • Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay will make a significant contribution to the generation of green and sustainable energy in the future in a manner which does not impact adversely on the local environment and community • It constructively seeks to meet the objectives of National Government policy on energy • It will allow for the provision of more public Open Space adjacent to an area of Swansea where it is notably lacking • It will promote healthier lifestyles through the provision of greater and inclusive social amenity which is accessible to all; for instance, walking and cycling • It will contribute significantly to employment opportunities in the region, particularly during the construction phase, but also post-construction • It will contribute to Art and Education in the region and offers the promise of involving communities of diverse backgrounds and ages in the development and use of facilities • It offers the prospect of reversing the decline in traditional regional maritime activities through the attraction of cruise ships using the Lagoon’s mooring potential • The innovative design proposed for power generation via Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay will create unique interest on a national and international scale and will, therefore, raise the profile of Swansea Bay, which is considered to be one of the most beautiful in the world • Consequently, it will boost visitor numbers to the region and thereby stimulate greater economic activity and prosperity • Finally, Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay will invest in the further re-generation and development of the Swansea Bay region, which continues to be a focus for attention within the European Union. "
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Mission Gallery
"Mission Gallery Representation Mission Gallery is one of Wales’ best adapted spaces for the contemporary arts. Mission Gallery has developed a reputation for dynamic and distinctive programming, to present excellence across the visual arts, applied arts and craft, from across Wales and beyond. With exhibition space, craft space, learning space, events, residency opportunities and more. Mission Gallery provides the local and wider community with opportunities to develop their understanding and knowledge of art. Mission Gallery is housed in a Grade II listed building and began its existence in 1977 as a voluntary artist run – artist led body. It developed into a professional organisation although remained voluntary until constituted as a Not for Profit Company Limited by Guarantee, in 2008. Governed by a voluntary board of directors, the management, programming and running is maintained by art-led staff and a dedicated team of volunteers. The Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay project is an £850 million investment that has the potential to provide a large inward investment into the Swansea bay region. The project has carried out a broad engagement process across a lot of varied sectors of the community throughout the last three years. They were assisted by Cape Farewell and have been working to establish an arts programme with a vision to create a forum for artists and scientists to be brought together. We at the Mission Gallery participated in a “Rural and Urban Exhibition” in January 2013 working with University of Swansea, UWWTSD, and LCRI to consider the impacts the lagoon might have on the community and beyond. A two-day short, rural and urban expedition around Swansea was held that brought together emerging art and design students into dialogue with scientists and leading scientific research in order to stimulate a creative response. Following on from the expedition the project has recently launched its open call for artists. The call is to the local and national community asking for potential designs for the cultural elements to be established in the footprint of the lagoon. At the Mission Gallery we are of the opinion that the lagoon proposal has the opportunity to offer lots of benefits to the local area, increasing tourist numbers and providing a cultural offering that would both stimulate and raise recognition of the artistic community in Wales and raise awareness for the Swansea Bay region. More people visiting the lagoon provides the opportunity for an uplift within the Gallery and the cultural programme the project is running provides a great opportunity for the local community to get involved and help shape the lagoon. "
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Neath Port Talbot Active Supporters Group
"Representation in Support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB) Project I am making a representation on behalf of the Neath Port Talbot Active Supporters Group (ASG) of which I am chairman. The Neath Port Talbot ASG comprises residents who have formed a positive view of the project over the pre-application stage and have registered to be kept informed of progress on the project. As a group we have a wide membership of all ages and backgrounds all living in the Neath Port Talbot area. Neath Port Talbot is an industrial area with a history of heavy industry including steel production, chemical industries and coal mining. The Neath Port Talbot community has been kept informed of the TLSB through the news and social media, local exhibitions and community presentations. The group strongly support the TLSB project and recognise the benefits that this project will bring to the area, employment, tourism, sports, leisure and educational opportunities have been highly commented on during community engagements. The group recognise the environmental importance of this project in terms of the generation of clean energy and reduction in Greenhouse gases associated with the traditional fossil fuel methods of energy generation. The TLSB will be a world first for this type of technology. The group support the growth of this type of project and welcome the fact that Swansea and Wales will attract high levels of media attention and the associated increase in visitors, jobs and academic interest can only be positive step for the region. In conclusion the Neath Port Talbot ASG membership have reviewed the project details and formed a strong opinion in support of the project. The economic, environmental and social benefits will greatly enhance the life opportunities of all living in the area. Ian Isaac – Chairman Neath Port Talbot ASG Robert Cherryman Joint Chair NPTASG "
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Phil Lake
"I AM THE OWNER OF LAKESIDE SECURITY , KING SLIDING DOOR GEAR AND PL PROPERTIES BASED IN A FACTORY AT FFORESTFACH IN SWANSEA. WHERE THERE ARE ONLY 2 FACTORIES WHO HAVE SOLAR PANELS ON THEIR ROOFS. IT HAS REDUCED MY YEARLY ELECTRICITY BILL FROM £2500 TO £400. WE MUST IMPROVE ON GREEN ENERGY AND THE TIDAL LAGOON WILL HAVE A HUGE POSITIVE IMPACT FOR SOURCING GREEN ENERGY, REDUCING ELECTRICITY BILLS LONG TERM AND INITIATING A NEW INDUSTRY FOR THIS AREA WHERE FUTURE LAGOONS WILL BENEFIT THE LOCAL WORKFORCE. THE FACT THAT SWANSEA IS THE SECOND LARGEST TIDAL BAY IN THE WORLD IS A MASSIVE ADVANTAGE. "
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Regen SW
"Regen SW is an independent centre for renewable energy expertise working to promote the development and deployment of renewable energy in the South West as a source of economic growth, environmental benefit and energy supply. As part of our work we support the South West Marine Energy Park, a collaborative partnership between industry, public sector and academia which seeks to ‘create a positive business environment that will attract investment, foster collaboration and accelerate the commercial development of the marine energy sector’. Since 2010 we have been engaged to look at the development of tidal range projects in the Bristol Channel including responding to the various Severn Barrage studies. In November 2012 we published a report with Marine Energy Matters entitled “Bristol Channel Energy - a Balanced Technology Approach”. In this document we proposed a new strategy for harnessing the massive energy potential of the Bristol Channel in a way which balances the imperative to generate low carbon energy with the protection of the environment, socio-economic interests and communities on both the Welsh and English sides of the channel. We proposed that this could be done by developing energy projects in the channel using multiple technologies (wind, wave and tidal) in an incremental manner with a build-out strategy from smaller to larger projects. Since publication this paper has received considerable support from industry and from environmental and public sector stakeholders in both England and Wales including the Sustainable Severn Group and the South West Marine Energy Park. The proposal to develop a first tidal lagoon in Swansea Bay fits with this overall strategy and we see this as an important first step towards the development of sustainable renewable energy projects across the Bristol Channel. "
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RenewableUK
"Found in 1978 and with over 600 corporate members, RenewableUK is the UK’s chief trade association for the wind, wave and tidal sectors. The Swansea bay Tidal Lagoon is a world leading project, which will ensure that Wales and the United Kingdom stay at the forefront of renewable energy development and the global drive to reduce CO2 emissions. It will open up a new source of highly predictable renewable energy supply. Importantly, this will bring significant net economic benefits both locally and nationally. The project has the potential to supply enough power to meet the annual needs of around 120,000 UK homes, each year, for 120 years. The technologies to be used in the construction and harnessing of this truly inexhaustible tidal resource have been tried and tested. Further implementation of these technologies will have significant benefits for the UK’s standing in the marine energy sector, enabling us to bank our expertise. It will also complement our existing renewable energy portfolio, by offering system balancing benefits. In addition, this project could contribute to the security of the UK electricity supply. The development will help us fulfil our international and domestic obligations in this policy area. Under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union (EU) is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions across the member states by 20% by 2020 and by 80% by 2050, compared to 1990 levels. The UK is committed to its contribution to these targets under the Climate Change Act. The generation from the Swansea Bay Lagoon would reduce the emission of greenhouse gases by displacing fossil fuel generation. This could prevent around 216,000 tonnes of CO2 from being emitted each year and therefore would make a significant contribution to the UK’s emission reduction targets. In addition to the energy security and environmental benefits set out above, we note that there are significant economic benefits to be gained by South Wales should this development go ahead. Many local contractors will be well placed to fulfil contracts in the construction and operation of the facility with the potential for around £300 million to be spent with companies producing components such as turbine housings, sluice gates and electrical controls. Early estimates suggest around 2880 jobs could be created during the construction period. It is also likely that permanent jobs would be created as a result of the recreation and amenity facilities and regeneration which is due to accompany the scheme. RenewableUK urge you to approve this application without delay and realise the economic, environmental and security of supply benefits that it has the potential to deliver. "
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Semta
"I support this submission as it will bring much needed employemnt in to the area and will have potential to promote skills development for local people which in turn will support local Training provision"
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Suzy Davies AM
"Consideration for the insfrastrucure during building needs to be fully considered with regard to how it interects with other developments in the area at the time. This could include both the potential for a positive interaction between them. Once such example of this would be the planned construction of Tata Steel’s new power plant at their Port Talbot steelworks site. This is due to potentially be built at the same time and they, as with Swansea Tidal Lagoon, have suggested the use of Swansea’s harbour to deliver constructions materials for the build. Tata have indicated that they would be open to discussions with Swansea Tidal Lagoon with regard to sharing facilities where possible. I am disappointed that Swansea Council have put forward a number of objecttions to the propised scheme, noting that people using the watrer and the facility wil be seven meters closer to the steelworks site at Port Talbot. It would appear that people using the water has not previosuly been an issue. I am pleased that the construction of the wall would apear to not be at a height that would effect the landscape or adversly effect the view from Mumbles, Gower, Swansea, Port Talbot, Aberavon, or any other surrounding areas. "
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Wales Quality Centre
"This is a hugely important project for Wales as a country, not only because of its magnitude but also because it presents us with the opportunity the to show our capabilities across a wide range skills that make us unique as a nation. As a country we are innovative, our universities have a sense of purpose that supports our industry and our manufacturing base is progressively moving into high value sectors that constantly drive innovation. Most importantly we continue to develop our sense of nationhood and this project is a platform that will demonstrate to the world economy that Wales is the place to be if you want to succeed in cutting edge technologies. We can not allow this opportunity to fail through the lack of imagination is any bureaucracy. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
The Gower Society
"1. We query the implications of many millions of tonnes of rock armouring that would be imported from a great distance into the area. 2. The free board above the high water mark of the proposal looks small and inadequate when compared to that on the deep water iron ore and coal importing dock at Port Talbot that is more sheltered. Any increase in height will impact on the seascape. 3. The winter storms of early 2014 demonstrate the need for larger defences at the exposed ends. The Port Talbot deep water harbour groins have spectacular man made armouring of concrete interlocking 'tetropods' .The site (west) has greater exposure to westerly and south westerly Atlantic swells than the Port Talbot harbour walls. 4. The proposal to use dredged aggregates from within the impounding area looks at first to be an elegant solution to the construction of the 'bunds' or perimeter wall core. These have to be of a particular grading and alternatively importing quantities from outside the lagoon in the area is not an option i.e. previous Public Enquirys such as the 2005 Helwick Bank Application raised awareness to sand movement and resulted in dredging moving to the Nobel bank on a licensed volume per annum. . 5. Undesirable elements (such as heavy metals) have been deposited in the sands and silts over the last 200 years and these will be dispersed by the dredging/suction/filling process. 6. There are concerns about damage to marine mammals and in particular the harbour porpoises that are well documented to use this area. All of the quoted Pierpoint Reports MUST be available for public scrutiny. We also draw your attention to the EU legal action relating to the failure of UK Government to nominate Marine SACs that includes Swansea Bay. Consideration needs to be given to the legal position of developments being progressed by the UK Government. 7. The impact on sand and silt movements within Swansea Bay and Port Talbot must be rigorously analysed. The impact upon the main Welsh Water sea outfalls and shipping must be carefully considered as well as the beaches west of Mumbles. 8. Large diameter and long Welsh Water Outfalls discharge into Swansea Bay; Mumbles, Sandfields, Fabian Way, Baglan and Afan. There are also numerous smaller ones. 9. The implications of these upon the bathing water quality are great because the whole regime of circulation and mixing will be drastically changed by this proposal. 20 years ago Welsh Water spent considerable amounts of time and money analysing the effects upon the bathing water aspects and marine environment and all that will be radically changed. The whole of Swansea Bay will now require stringent hydraulic remodelling .i.e. of rivers, outfalls and natural currents to assess the impact upon water quality and sand movement. 10 The Welsh Water outfall from Fabian Way Waste Sewage Treatment Works must be thoroughly protected (and extended out of the lagoon) and the consequences of the structure upon the effluent movements from this and the Long Sea Outfalls from Afan and Baglan waste water treatment works modelled to ensure full dispersion and dilution. 11.There is potential impact upon the Fabian Way/Crymlyn Burrows and Blackpill SSSI's and full rigorous appraisal is required. 12.We have serious concerns that the possible fringe benefits of the scheme (additional to generating electricity) have been exaggerated by the developer and the impact upon the iconic sweep of Swansea Bay and its seascape underplayed. The general public appear to have not appreciated the full visual impact of this proposal . "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
The Kitchen Table
"I am making a representation as the owner of The Kitchen Table in support of the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon project. The Kitchen Table is a 40 cover gastro-café in Mumbles serving simple home-cooked food made with great local ingredients. We believe that putting money directly into the pockets of the people that produce it has a great benefit to our local community and Wales as a whole. We opened in June 2010 and now have a fantastic family of staff and friends (up to 20 throughout the seasons) who help make the kitchen table an inviting place to come back to. We are consistently voted No 1 in Mumbles on TripAdvisor! We think that a tidal lagoon in Swansea Bay should be granted development consent because: The project uses a naturally occurring environmental resource to create clean, reliable and predictable energy. It sets an exemplary project that should be replicated in ALL the appropriate coastal locations around the UK. The proposed design of the lagoon and its associated buildings will be visually stunning, showcasing modern architectural design and as stated in Chapter 4 of the Environmental Statement will be produced to a high standard using sustainable materials and contributing to the overall energy efficiency of the whole development. We fully endorse Tidal Lagoon Power’s statement in appendix 22.1 to the Environmental Statement that it will seek Welsh and UK suppliers for the critical components of the project to achieve a minimum of 50% Welsh content for the entire project projected to be in the region of £300 million. Creating a new tourist attraction and sports/ recreation venue will be significant for Swansea, creating associated jobs for local people and supporting local businesses. This will mean more visitors to Swansea Bay and Mumbles and we hope that it would have a positive influence on tourism and trade throughout the Bay. Having such an amazing area designed specifically for recreational activities such as walking, running and cycling in addition to becoming a location for large sports events we hope would encourage residents of Swansea and South Wales to truly appreciate the environment they live in and encourage them to use it more. It would be hugely disappointing for Swansea and its residents if development consent was not granted to TLSB because it makes complete sense to harness a natural resource in a reliable and safe way to produce power. The additional benefits that TLSB propose to include as part of the generation plant will become a great asset to the Swansea, offering new opportunities and making it a true destination city once again. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Robert Llewellyn John
"I write as a former Chair of Wales in London which is a members organisation, based in London, which seeks to provide the diaspora in London with opportunities to become aware of and/or become involved in issues which are of strategic importance to Wales. Last October we convened an energy conference to review low carbon opportunities where Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon provided one of the key note speakers. It was clear from the presentation and subsequent discussion that this project garnered most support from the audience. The key attributes included: - the ability to harness the energy in this location without the damaging implications of alternative schemes such as the Severn Barrage - the ability to create a predictable source of energy non reliant on the importation of fossil fuels - the opportunity, when combining this project with further tidal lagoons (with different tidal patterns) to get close to a base load provision of electricity - a scheme with little, if any , decommissioning concerns with in theory (and probably in practice) a life span of over 100 years We were particularly impressed with the care given to local concerns and the commitment evidenced of successful dialogue with key stakeholders, both commercial and environmental. we also endorsed the Company's commitment to leisure recognising the importance that could have to the Region's tourism offer. Having being involved in major projects (I was formerly Deputy Chief Executive of Canary Wharf) I was particularly interested in the stated commitment to local/UK content and both at that meeting and subsequently sought detail on that aspect. From those discussions I am clear that the economic impact will be significant not only during the construction phase of Swansea Bay but over time if the company is able, as it plans, to follow this project with others.The opportunity to set up a world class assembly operation in Swansea, working in collaboration with the world's major turbine manufactures, represents a rare opportunity. The identification of a UK supply chain has significant employment implications not just in Swansea but nationally. Given all those "attributes" the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon project received the strong endorsement of my members in October since they recognised its potential not only as a "stand alone project" but as an exemplar project for Wales with an ability to create significant inward investment. I was sufficiently impressed that I have offered to provide the Company with support should that be necessary."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Sally Clayden
"I am writing to give my complete support to the Swansea Tidal Lagoon power generation scheme. 1. The first point I will make is that we must address the cause of climate change. This has been studied over many decades by scientists the world over, who are virtually unanimous in their opinion that man-made carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are a major factor affecting climate change. The level of CO2 in the world’s atmosphere is now over 400 parts per million, from 280 parts per million at the end of the 18th century. Limiting this is a question of survival. 2. The tidal lagoon would be a regular, known and predictable source of electrical energy with zero carbon emissions. The Severn estuary has the second highest tidal range in the world. The lagoon will fit into the landscape, with a minimum of disturbance. The efforts to minimise the small disturbances must continue, but as I have said above, it is a question of survival. Therefore, the Severn estuary should be one of the first places where these schemes should be placed. 3. There is world-wide interest in energy generation which does not add CO2 to the atmosphere. I am sure that the vast majority of residents of Swansea and the surrounding areas would support its establishment and they would be proud that Swansea was the first place where the technology was developed. I believe these two factors would ensure that Swansea and the surrounding region would receive visitors from around the world to visit it. The enclosure wall would be a popular recreational venue for local people, together with safer water-sport possibilities within the lagoon. 4. I support the efforts of Tidal Lagoon Swansea to source as much of the infrastructure from the region as possible, together with the fact that this would be where these techniques were developed. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Swansea Fishermen on behalf of Swansea Fishermen
"Notice of Objection to a Proposed Tidal Lagoon off Swansea East Breakwater Swansea fishermen’s group, representing the following fishermen, object to this proposal. (representing individuals, list supplied to case team)           The above fishermen make this objection insomuch that it is neither flippant nor feckless. The above have fished within the proposed site in each and every year for numerous years. The above fishermen will quantify that the others within this group have fished in this area for a minimum of 5 years consecutively and preceding the date of this correspondence. The above fishermen acknowledge that there are a number of fishermen not making this joint response. The above fishermen do not recognise that other fishermen meet the criteria set out as reasonable by the group. The above group have complied with enactment of law regarding their fishing activities. Reasons for objection. FISHERIES The reader will recognise the importance of this topic to us, in so much as; Loss of opportunity Fishermen will lose an area vital to their economic survivability. It is an enormous area which has different target species and benthic communities than adjacent areas. Within the proposed Lagoon site the following species are targeted; Lobsters, whelks, green and red crabs, oysters, cuttle fish, bass, sole, mullet. The list is not finite. The winter fishery for whelks, oysters and fish species is vital. Inclement winter weather reduces opportunity elsewhere. Trawling takes place to the southern half of the proposed development. The area has probably the largest stock of native oysters within Swansea Bay. One Swansea fisherman has consistently prosecuted the oyster beds year on year in contradiction to the scoping document submitted by TL. Shoals of herring uniquely choose this area to spawn. Local fishermen use this as an opportunity to target them, often catching in excess of 1 tonne during this time. In December and January, February and March cod and bass frequent this area because of the spawning herring and are targeted. The cod are in the 1-2 kilo size. Loss of Habitat Habitat for resident species will be destroyed by the project. The spawning area for herring and the oyster beds will be engulfed by the Lagoon. It is acknowledged that the rock armour to the proposed development will provide a reef effect. This will provide an ideal habitat for decapods but at the expense of the surrounding area. Whelks, although a mobile species will be displaced to inaccessible areas. COASTAL PROCESSES Change in tidal conditions. The Lagoon construction will significantly alter the anticlockwise gyre in the tide which exists, and sediment deposition. Insufficient modelling has been carried out to determine the effect over the entire bay. ELECTROMAGNETIC EFFECT Electromagnetic fields impacting on elasmobranches Elasmobranches detect their prey using sensors and determine the location of their food using electromagnetic fields. Jersey marine beach has long been recognised as a nursery area for small eyed ray. Loss of marine communities. Marine life in its entirety will be engulfed by the project. Navigation The group considers that “backwash” in the navigational channel will adversely affect small boats egressing and entering the Tawe River basin. VISUAL IMPACT No comment NEEDS AND BENEFIT No comment ALTERNATIVE SITES Little has been said about this. East of the Nash lighthouse there would be no visual effect, no impact on fishing, no impact on navigation and a more dynamic tidal flow. LANDSCAPE AND COASTLINE. No comment Water quality Construction will effect water quality and turbitity. The proposed Tidal Lagoon will most definitely disadvantage commercial fishermen I would ask the inspectorate to consider our objections together with the conclusions made by the Inspector following the SCARWEATHER SANDS enquiry. Ian Wisby   "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Alstom Power
"Alstom is present in around 100 countries, has 93,000 permanent employees, is a global leader in the world of power generation, power transmission and rail rolling stock and infrastructure, and sets the benchmark for innovative and environmentally friendly technologies. We have the most comprehensive range of renewable power generation solutions today: hydro, tidal, wind, geothermal, biomass and solar. Alstom is a leading supplier in hydro power, the largest source of renewable energy on the planet, having supplied turbines and generators for 25% of worldwide installed capacity. In the UK Alstom operates out of more than 30 key locations and employs around 6,500 people within its Transport, Power and Grid Sectors, helping to develop the UK's power, transmission and transport infrastructure to meet the challenges ahead. We believe that tidal range energy resource in the UK is significant, and has the potential, through lagoon projects, to provide a reliable, affordable and predictable source of renewable power. From the Alstom Hydro perspective the low head power generation technology needed for tidal lagoon applications is well understood and generally has been deployed in significant volume globally in conventional hydro projects. Alstom is one of the most experienced in exploiting tidal range power generation with proven experience in designing and installing 240MW La Rance tidal power station near Saint Malo in Brittany, France, for EDF over 40 years ago. Alstom Hydro has been an ardent and proactive supporter of the Swansea Bay project since 2011 and continues to apply its extensive technical know-how and capability for the benefit of the project and its stakeholders. This is an infrastructure project of significant scale and complexity, and should it go ahead will require substantial use of local resources to construct, install and operate. Power generation equipment manufacturers, such as Alstom, would directly benefit from the project and in turn would commit to develop and extend the supply chain in the UK and in Wales. This project should also be considered as a landmark development in the tidal range market of which UK has the highest potential share across the globe. A pipeline of follow-on projects can be foreseen that will benefit from economies of scale and the feedback from the Swansea Bay project. In this context further scaling of supply chain commitments could be expected to follow at local, regional and national levels. In conclusion, we fully support this project in terms of its ability to contribute predictable and cost-effective renewable power for the UK and its potential to deliver significant economic benefit to Wales and the UK, in its own right and through the development of a long term tidal lagoon market for which it is the pioneer. "
Awdurdodau Lleol
Brecon Beacons National Park Authority
"I write in response to this consultation on behalf of the Brecon Beacons National Park Authority Section 63 of the Environment Act (1995) sets out the statutory purposes of the National Park as follows:- • To conserve and enhance the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the National Park; and • To promote opportunties for the public understanding and enjoyment of the special qualities of the National Park In accordance with section 62(2) of the Environment, any relevant Authority shall have regard to National Park purposes when performing any functions in relation to, or so as to affect, land in a National Park. Relevant Authorities include public bodies, government departments, local authorities and statutory undertakers. Planning Policy Wales 5th edition 2012 (PPW) acknowledges that statutory purposes of National Parks and reinforces the “Sandford Principle”, whereby if there is a conflict between the statutory purposes, greater weight shall be given to the first purpose of conserving and enhancing the natural environment. PPW also recognises that natural heritage issues are not confined by administrative boundaries and that the duty to have regard to National Park purposes applies to activities affecting these areas, whether those activities lie within or outside the designated area. PPW places significant emphasis on the need to deliver an energy programme that contributes towards reducing carbon emissions as a means of tackling climate change. The Welsh Assembly Government’s Policy Statement (2010) sets out an aim for Wales to be in a position by 2050 where almost all of the local energy needs can be met by low carbon electricity production, and thus Local Planning Authorities should seek to facilitate the delivery of such developments whilst avoiding, and where possible minimising environmental, social and economic impacts. The development plan for the National Park area is the Brecon Beacons National Park Authority Local Development Plan 2007-2022 (LDP). Section 3.1.3 of the LDP sets out that whilst the National Park is a landscape designation there are instances where strict application of the boundary in making decisions is not appropriate - Cross Boundary issues include for example wind energy development and transport infrastructure. As previously set out section 62 (2) of the Environment Act (1995) places a duty on LDPs to have regard to the National Park purposes in making planning decisions which may impact on the National Park. The Authority will use LDP policy SP1 in commenting on proposals that impact on the National Park. Policy SP1 sets out the following:- Development in the National Park will be required to comply with the purposes and statutory duty set out in legislation, and will be permitted where it: a) Conserves and enhances the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the Park; and/or b) Provides for, or supports, the understanding and enjoyment of the special qualities of the National Park in a way that does not harm those special qualities; and c) Fulfils the two purposes above and assists the economic and social well-being of local communities. The Authority has had opportunity to review the application and supporting information, and is satisfied that the proposal is of a scale and distance from the National Park so as to prevent any significant adverse impact on the natural beauty, wildlife or cultural heritage of the National Park. As such we have no objections to this proposal. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
response has attachments
Briton Ferry Shipping Services
"We own and operate a port facility on the River Neath at which we load and discharge cargoes of items such as steel coil, scrap metal, animal food etc. Our main concern is that the construction of the new seawall could adversely affect the safe navigation for vessels using our wharf."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Cathryn Allen
"My family are from and still live in Swansea. Tidal Lagoon in Swansea Bay could be a real opportunity and catalyst for economic regeneration e.g. jobs for the construction industry, employing local people. These are badly needed. A regeneration of the eastern part of Swansea that has to cope with a significant industrial legacy Fantastic opportunity to provide a range of world class leisure activities that could be used by the local population as well as acting as a magnet for developing tourism to Swansea Bay and further afield Significant educational benefits for school children to learn about cutting edge technologies. It does not appear to affect Gower as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
RenewableUK Cymru
"RenewableUK Cymru is the Wales branch of RenewableUK, and represents all renewable energy technologies, as well as energy storage, in Wales. The proposed tidal lagoon at Swansea offers a number of significant benefits to the local community, the wider region, as well as supporting wider national and international efforts to increase the generation of low-carbon electricity. The project itself could be the first step in developing the tidal range potential in Wales, and this would be a significant component of Wales' low-carbon generation over the coming few years. Even more interesting might be the potential offered to replicate this scheme in other places around the coast of Wales, and further afield, all of which would support employment within and outside Wales. The project is about much more than energy generation; the ancillary benefits could be considered as beneficial as the ‘main’ output of renewable electricity. These ancillary benefits include recreation and sporting facilities, regeneration through wider waterfront development and a call for visionary artistic interpretation and sculpture works at the site of the lagoon. A successful planning application for the project would feed into a wider, Swansea Bay approach to supporting renewable energy, and help deliver greater strategic buy-in to the benefits that renewable energy can bring, via coordinated activity through companies such as Tata Steel, Mabey Bridge and Vattenfall. We have been impressed by the efforts made by Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon in carrying out meaningful consultation with the local community, and with the wider community around South Wales. Their dialogue has ensured a high level of awareness about the project, and the benefits and impacts of the development. Given the potential offered by the project for renewable energy generation, local economic development, wider strategic opportunities, as well as the responsible way in which consultation has been carried out, we are happy to endorse the proposal. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Richard Nourse
"The UK is committed to reducing emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050, and to producing 15% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. National Policy Statements EN-1 and EN-3 state that the decision maker should consider that the need for new renewable energy infrastructure is established in any case. Swansea Bay Lagoon will produce 9% of Wales’ domestic energy needs from reliable, renewable sources by 2018 with carbon savings of 236,000 tonnes per annum. Compared to other renewable energy sources, TLSB requires the smallest space with the biggest energy output. TLSB is intended to be the first step in a network of lagoons that could one day see 10GW (10% of the UK’s energy needs) of predictable, reliable, renewable energy used as a baseload for the National Grid. The construction and operational phases of the lagoon will bring significant economic benefits to Wales. Appendix 3 of the Planning Statement sets out TLSBs outline supply chain strategy, which aims to ensure the benefit of development remains in Swansea Bay through a commitment of 50% spend in Wales. Appendix 2 of the Planning Statement sets out TLSBs outline education and skills strategy, which aims to ensure that the Project has the highest possible benefit in terms of local sustainable development, jobs and skills. The impact of the Project on environmental receptors has been assessed as part of an extensive EIA process; where impacts have been identified, mitigation measures and their delivery have been presented. The nature of the Lagoon’s design will provide habitat’s suitable for the re-introduction of species to the Bay, resulting in a net environmental benefit, while the arts, sporting and educational facilities provided as an integral part of the development will provide a net social benefit for the people of Swansea Bay. "
Sefydliadau Anstatudol
Swansea Bay Port Health authority
"Whilst the Swansea Bay Port Health Authority is supportive of the lagoon concept, I consider that submitted proposals do not adequately ensure best water quality within the bay. No detail has been included regarding the position of the outfall from the sewage treatment works after the lagoon has been constructed. This Authority understands that two options remain under consideration by the applicant: 1. Retention of an outfall within the waters enclosed by the lagoon wall with additional UV treatment of storm water discharges 2. Extension of the existing outfall beyond the lagoon wall further into the open waters of Swansea Bay. The reliance upon additional UV treatment of storm water discharges to the enclosed waters is inadequate in my opinion. This Authority would seek assurance that the outfall will be extended to a suitable position outside the waters enclosed by the lagoon wall. - The option to retain the outfall within the enclosure waters has potential hazard both for recreational users of those waters and commercial shellfish production proposed within the lagoon. - Any extension of the outfall must terminate at a suitable location to ensure that existing shellfish beds to the western edge of the bay are not subjected to increased pollution from this source. Further to my previous correspondence, I wish to make the representation, detailed below, for your consideration in determining the application. For information, I am Director of Port Health Services serving Swansea Bay Port Health Authority and submit the representation below on behalf of that Joint Board. Although not a statutory consultee, the Joint Board has jurisdiction over the waters within Swansea Bay by virtue of the Swansea Bay Port Health Order 1991 as amended. As such, pursuant to the Food Safety Act, the Joint Board is the "Food Authority" responsible for monitoring shellfish harvests from the Bay and seeks assurance regarding best possible water quality affecting commercial harvest operations post construction of the Lagoon. Members of this Authority are supportive, in principle, of the project and have already discussed various concerns with the developers, including those of navigation within the channel towards the River Neath and the effects upon coastal processes within the Bay. As these matters are being addressed by various statutory consultees in their representations to you, this representation focuses upon the key issue within the province of this Authority i.e. water quality. REPRESENTATION - Application document references: 1. Volume 6 Chapter 4 pages 49 - 51 - surface water and sewage disposal aspects of water quality enhancements 2. Volume 6 Chapter 7 pages 48 - 53 - "optimisation applications" 3. Volume 6 Chapter 7 pages 76 - 81 - storm impact applications - shellfish waters REPRESENTATION detail: Paragraph 4.3.9.4 deals with the options considered for sewage and storm water disposal. Of the two options preferred by the developers, other paragraphs in the application bias selection of option (ii) - UV disinfection of storm water, with retention of the existing sewage outfall within the Lagoon. The document fails to consider a further option of combining storm water UV treatment with outfall extension beyond the sea wall of the Lagoon. The application detail lacks reassurance that the best available means of mitigating pollution will be implemented in the construction. The level of uncertainty about water quality, post construction, and the subsequent effects on shellfish quality both within the enclosed Lagoon and generally within Swansea Bay is a matter of real concern both to Members of this Authority and, I am confident, to those with a commercial interest. Furthermore, the documentation lacks assurance about sustainable recreational use by swimmers and others of the waters enclosed within the Lagoon - the mitigation measures being simply to halt such use until potential pollution spikes have been resolved / subsided. Given that this project is both innovative and iconic, the proposal detail should include the best practicable means of securing sustainable water quality improvements within and outside the Lagoon. Integral to the design, I would suggest that the alternative storm water and sewage disposal means outlined above is considered as a condition of approval. "
Ymgyngoreion Statudol Eraill
The Crown Estate
"The Crown Estate manages property and rights which are owned by Her Majesty in right of the Crown. This portfolio includes around half of the foreshore and almost the entire seabed out to 12 nautical miles around the UK. Under the Energy Act 2004 and the Energy Act 2008, The Crown Estate also manages the rights over the continental shelf to offshore energy generation and the rights to carbon dioxide and natural gas storage and transportation (respectively). The Crown Estate requests to be registered as an Interested Party in the examination of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (the “Project”). Our interest in the Project is that implementation of the Project will only be possible where rights are granted for that purpose by The Crown Estate, as the site of the Project falls (substantially) within seabed managed by The Crown Estate. As advised in previous correspondence, no such rights have been granted by The Crown Estate for the Project and we wish to ensure that we are informed of the progress of the Project’s examination. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
University of bristol
"I represent a team of penultimate/final undergraduate students at the University of Bristol who have been gaining support from Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay PLC (TLP)for a project related to Site Selection and Design of Tidal Lagoons for the Severn Estuary. The project sponsor is Parsons Brinckerhoff and TLP have been providing additional industry support. The team would be keen to enable results from their own research and technical design work on tidal lagoons to contribute to the Planning Application process. We would also be keen to provide input to the plans being developed by TLP for an education and skills programme. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Waterloo Foundation
" I am making this representation on behalf of The Waterloo Foundation (TWF) of which I have been a Trustee since its inception 7 years ago. I have particular responsibility for TWF’s Environment Fund. The Foundation (www.waterloofoundation.org.uk) was set up in 2007 to tackle the global challenges of the day – climate change and world poverty. As such it has supported nearly a thousand projects with grants totalling over £46m, across our four key programme areas - World Development; Environment; Child Development; Projects in Wales. We support this project and its objective to produce renewable energy from the tides of Swansea Bay, as it clearly aligns with many of the aims of our organisation. In terms of world development, the production of energy from tidal power, through reducing the effects of climate change and reducing the need to exploit their ever decreasing resources. It is quite clear that the effects of climate change will be felt most keenly by the poorest people on the planet, who lack the ability and resources to adapt to the changing patterns in our weather. The reduction of CO2 emissions resulting from the switch to renewable energy such as that in Swansea Bay, will also slow down ocean acidification, a threat to the food security of many of the world’s poor. The Lagoon is a strongly positive project for the environment and we are pleased to support it as such. It will help reduce greenhouse gas emissions for Wales, which in 2010 stood at 46.6Mt, of which 35% resulted from the supply of energy . In addition, as Wales currently imports a large percentage of coal, the project will have additional global benefits directly through reducing shipping emissions and indirectly yet more powerfully, by protecting standing forests that can be easily destroyed through mining for coal. As Wales made its fortune through the sale and export of coal it seems only fitting that Wales should now be the location for the first tidal lagoon. This will go some way to making up for all the carbon previously exported and burnt. At a more local scale, the project will benefit the immediate environment of the Swansea Bay area, by protecting the foreshore enclosed by the lagoon, and countering the damage to the area that has resulted from the historic industrial activity on the Docks. It will also provide new habitat for fish and crustaceans on the lagoon wall itself, and through kelp beds which are important nursery breeding grounds for fish stocks, thereby supporting local fisheries. Its plans to see the reintroduction of the native Swansea Bay oysters will increase biodiversity and boost the local fishing industry. Oysters contain extremely high levels of zinc, an often missing mineral yet vital for our immune systems. The Foundation’s Child Development Fund supports research into diet and the impact on mental and physical health. Eating fish and seafood is now widely accepted as key to good mental well-being. The Foundation also supports the Swansea Bay team’s inclusion within the Project of work to promote education about climate change, tidal power and engineering with local schools and higher education institutions. Lastly, but by no means least, as an organisation which looks to increase the provision of employment opportunities in Wales, The Waterloo Foundation is strongly supportive of TLSB’s commitment to local employment and training schemes in Wales, not least the potential opportunity to create a whole tidal lagoon industry resulting from the Lagoon and based in and around Swansea Bay. The impact of TLSB will be huge in terms of benefit to the local economy with plans to manufacture and assemble key parts of the lagoon infrastructure (i.e. the turbines) here in Wales. Buildings for the scheme are also due to be manufactured in Wales, with all of the associated jobs – many of them new – this brings. There will also be benefits for the wider UK economy with supply chains and other manufacturing opportunities across the UK. Given all of the above, we believe the benefits of Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay are considerable and so The Waterloo Foundation is pleased to support it. Yours sincerely, Capt. Janet Alexander, Trustee "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
welsh triathlon
"Welsh Triathlon have considered the information provided to them on the TLSB project for a Tidal Lagoon in Swansea Bay and would like to make a representation concentrating on our area of expertise and how the project would benefit our organisation and the wider triathlon and multisport community. Welsh Triathlon as the NGB for Triathlon and related multisports in Wales has a remit to advance the opportunities for its community with regards training facilities and competition venues. Welsh Triathlon would like to see, if it gets the go ahead, that the project incorporates design that is favourable, and can be enhanced with features that allow and encourage use, as a recreational facility. This would be in line with our organisational objectives. The current design as presented to us would provide an excellent venue for open water swimming training and competition. We would want to see adequate parking and areas to set up triathlon transition points near swim exits considered in the design. Consideration of how the different sports co-exist i.e. sailing and open water swimming would be required. Multi-discipline consultation for the requirements and planning of use should be incorporated at all stages. Our main areas of concern with the design for specifically triathlon use would be the nature of the barrier wall. Currently we are not sure whether we could organise an event using the barrier wall as a route due its exposed nature. Any design would need to consider safety on the wall of cyclist. It is possible however to route cycling paths along the more sheltered parts of the wall and have an out and back triathlon competition circuit. Running around the barrier wall would less of a concern. Any consideration of the site for triathlon use would need to take into consideration the exposure, safety and possibilities of future cycle and run routes of differing distances to cater for small club and major events. As a recreational facility we can definitely see potential in the venue both as a training facility and for holding regular or annual major events. Whilst we are aware that events such as major triathlons can have significant economic impact on a community and smaller regular events such as children triathlons and regular club activity can build up around facilities and encourage participation, we are not currently in a position to comment on the political, economic and environmental impact of the venue. What we can say is that clubs build up around recreational facilities and we would encourage such club development, particularly in the sort of venue being proposed, which would be inclusive training and competition space for disability athletes, children and novice triathletes as well as established athletes. Events and activity bring a more active volunteer group with coaches, club and event volunteers. Events also increase participation from the local community and bring in athletes and their families from the outside the community. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Canoe Wales
"I am the National Development Officer making a representation in support of Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay on behalf of Canoe Wales. Canoe Wales (CW) is the national governing body for paddle sport in Wales with over 1800 individual members and more than 2000 affiliated club and centre members. Our main aim is to encourage as many people to try paddle sport and to get out on the water. CW is a part of the UK’s umbrella governing body, the British Canoe Union. CW would like to see the construction of the tidal lagoon in Swansea because we support the development of renewable energy. In particular we are keen to see the development of the water sports facilities that are proposed as part of the overall construction. We would hope that the lagoon could be a great asset for all water sports including canoeing due to its planned vehicle access and associated parking facilities, plus the lagoon will allow for easy access to the water from the Swansea Bay shoreline given that the lagoon will have water access irrelevant to the tide times unlike the main bay. We are confident that the TLSB could assist in the further development of our sport in Swansea and South Wales and are keen to discuss further with them about the potential to: 1. Increase involvement of schools in paddle sport CW encourages the setting up of school canoe clubs and is currently working with three counties in Wales to ensure that every child has an opportunity within the school year to try canoeing. CW anticipate that TLSB would open this opportunity up to schools in South Wales and could provide another location to be used in the Welsh School Mini Olympics as part of our activities with Gemau Cymru as well as for Canoe school regattas. 2. Development of sprint canoeing including the holding of major events Sprint canoeing is an up and coming sport and has been given further exposure through its inclusion in the Olympics. TLSB offer an easy access (off the M4) location for training and offer the potential for Wales to feature as a major event location on the Canoe Sprint calendar, given the space in the lagoon, spectator facilities and associated amenities. Having training and events facilities in South Wales would increase the potential for Wales to produce elite athletes in this filed through offering the opportunity to get involved in the sport as a child and being able to take them through to becoming an elite athlete. 3. Development of Canoe Polo Further development of this sport would be through offering additional venues for training and competition events. Currently the best venue in South Wales is in the Cardiff Docks which is not an ideal location due to the security requirements for holding such an event. Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay offer great opportunities for further development of our sport from grass route level all the way to elite athlete through the offering of a location for training, coaching and the holding of competitive events and should be granted consent for development. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
David and Heather Stevens
"We are making this representation on behalf of ourselves, David and Heather Stevens. We are two of the co-founders of Admiral Insurance, the only current FTSE100 listed company in Wales. We support the potential for this project to provide 9% of Wales’ energy needs from a reliable, renewable source of energy, that is the tidal energy from the tides of Swansea Bay. We believe that this development should gain consent due to its contribution to mitigating the effects of climate change, as per the aims of EU, National and Welsh policy. This is a forward looking project, which will pave the way for further lagoons, that together can form a key part of meeting the UK’s future energy needs. As business leaders in Wales, we both welcome and support the economic benefits for Swansea Bay and Wales as a whole, that the Lagoon project would bring, in terms of: the impact of the £750-£850 million capital investment on the region; the direct jobs from construction, manufacture of parts and the general operation of the Lagoon; the attraction of tourists to the area; ; and for Wales and the UK, the creation of a new Lagoon industry based in South Wales. With the Project’s ability to mitigate the effects of climate change and its local and wider economic value, we believe that the benefits of this development are multiple and will bring something positive for everyone in Swansea Bay and Wales."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
David Slater
"Representation Submission I am making this submission for myself as I feel that I have personally been instrumental in bringing the original idea to the Company, Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB), as a pioneering renewables project, which I strongly believe in. I must however, declare that I am now a non- Executive Director of the company and a Director of Cambrensis Ltd. a Risk and Sustainability Consultancy which has undertaken some work on the project for the Company (TLSB). I was from 1991 to 1996, Chief Inspector of Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Pollution and subsequently until 1998, Director of Environmental Protection at The Environment Agency. On leaving the Agency I have been active in promoting and implementing new technologies for addressing the urgent need for alternative and sustainable (low carbon or renewable), power generation and distribution. I am currently an Honorary Professor in the School of Engineering at Cardiff University, developing a focus for Welsh Energy Systems Research and Development. The Significance of the Proposal As well as being a prime example of the kind of technology crucially needed to meet the challenges of global warming and needless world resource depletion, I recognized that this project was highly significant for the UK in that as well as helping to meet CO2 targets, its reliability, predictability and a degree of (Dinorwic type) flexibility, can provide not just the renewable power, but also the type of generation increasingly needed for stability of the grid with less coal and more and more intermittent, weather dependent sources such as wind and solar. It also efficiently utilities, for the first time, one of our potentially important natural resources, the tidal energy available in the Severn Estuary (among the highest in the world). Lagoon Power has the advantage over the current marine propositions in that it has a low environmental profile and uses proven, reliable, low head turbine technology and construction techniques. This is in contrast to the limited power, environmental impact and vulnerability of wave followers and subsea “windmills”. Finally I believe it can provide a much needed world class centre of excellence, manufacture and development for South Wales. Once operational and having demonstrated its inherent advantages, I have no doubt that this technology has a chance of becoming the renewable energy source of choice for areas of the world with high tidal ranges. Environmental Impacts I am used to evaluating and regulating environmental impacts of industrial operations and I am impressed with the thoroughness and sensitivity with which the siting, surveying and long term effects have been addressed, evaluated and emphasized. Also their sensitivity and enthusiasm in local community involvement, in my experience, has been exceptional; and is justly rewarded with the degree of local support (not just non-objection) it is getting. Participation I hope the above demonstrates that I have a vested interest in seeing this project developed successfully (but responsibly), as I am convinced it will bring real benefits, not just to the people of Swansea, but will help us all address our global responsibilities in a viable and constructive way. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Dr Simon Boxall
"As a professional oceanographer and academic at the University of Southampton who has studied coastal and estuarine processes over the past 30 years, and who has also worked on climate change issues I am a strong supporter of the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon. In the UK tidal power is potentially the most reliable and least disruptive of all renewable energy resources. Tidal power is considered by many as a new and untested source of energy, but it is in fact one that has been used to great effect across Europe since the 7th Century. At their peak there were more than two hundred tidal mills in operation along the coast of England and Wales, and each had its own tidal pond which provided important natural habitats for birds and marine life. Many of these ponds are today classified as sites of special scientific interest such is their importance to bio-diversity. The Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon is a 21st Century tide mill, making use of the UK’s vast tidal range in generating sufficient electricity to supply the significant part of the needs of Swansea. This is a first step towards a network of coastal lagoons that would significantly contribute to Britain’s expanding energy needs. The tide can be predicted over a million years in advance and the lagoon will generate power for at least 70% of the day. The wonderful thing about the tide is that when it is slack water (not generating power) in one location, just 50 miles down the coast the tide will be in full flood or ebb feeding energy into the National Grid 24 hours a day. It will provide clean (zero carbon, zero by-products) and inexpensive power once built with no infrastructure issues of gas or oil supply and will help the UK in its self-sufficiency for power in the future. The structure will have no significant impact on the water circulation of the region and will not change the intertidal regions of the Bristol Channel in terms of wild life. If designed well the walls of the lagoon will provide an artificial reef environment (both on the inside and outside), which will enhance natural bio-diversity. The turbines will be substantially less harmful to individual fish than the shipping movements in the region. None of the key estuaries will be impacted and so migration of species such as salmon will be unaffected. The construction will cause some sediment re-suspension but this will be localized – I have had experience of larger monitoring projects such as the construction of the Channel Tunnel where we were responsible for using satellite data to measure the amount of sediment re-suspension during the terminal works. It proved to be localized and had minimum impact on the local benthic habitat. Careful landscaping, wall design and use of the lagoon will provide a valuable resource for this important tourist region, with a visitors’ center and recreational resources adding to the attraction of the Swansea region. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Electrical Contractors' Association - South Wales Regional Office
"I confirm our Trade Association's support to the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon Project for many reasons - it will offer job opportunities not only for our Members who can become part of the supply chain but also job creation opportunities in Engineering, Maintenance, Facilities Management, and also Apprenticeship Opportunities that would be available right across the construction sector. The Project not only offers these opportunities during the Construction Stage but also long term employment opportunities once completed i.e. Retail, Leisure and Tourism opportunities that will be created thereafter. The Tidal Lagoon Project is more efficient than other energy sources and we must support and promote latest emerging energy sources as much as possible to the mutual benefit of the local communities and all Stakeholders involved. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Welsh Liberal Democrats on behalf of Kirsty Williams AM
"Wales has a rich and diverse marine environment. Welsh inshore waters cover 16,000 km², an area almost double the size of Wales, of which 5,600 km² are under designation across 125 marine protected areas. Such an expanse offers enormous potential for the development and operation of renewable energy projects. However, this can only be done with due consideration given to the vital ecosystems our seas contain, respect for conservation areas on our coasts such as Sites of Special Scientific Interest, and the sustainability of the Welsh fishing and tourism industries which are reliant upon them. The Welsh Liberal Democrats support the development of tidal range power in the Severn estuary and Bristol Channel, using a range of technologies. The Liberal Democrat Severn Tidal Forum has examined various options for tidal range power in the Severn estuary and Bristol Channel and has produced a significant position paper entitled ‘A Tidal Solution – The Way Forward’. The report endorses a mixed approach involving a range of technologies to best utilise the energy potential of the Severn, advocated an incremental approach, called for urgent development of a pilot lagoon to the seaward side of the potential Shoots barrage and advocated research and development work for a tidal reef from Aberthaw to Minehead. These recommendations have been adopted as policy by the Liberal Democrats at the federal level. As such, we welcome the proposals for the tidal lagoon in principle. In this context, I am delighted that the tidal lagoon project is currently under consideration. I believe that the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon represents an ambitious first step towards maximising renewable and low carbon energy generation from within the Severn Estuary. This project also represents an excellent opportunity for economic regeneration. Cardiff Business School has assessed that against a total capital expenditure of £756m, £299m could be spent in Wales. The project has been projected to provide1,850 full time equivalent jobs during construction, up to 60 in operation and 90 in leisure. There are still a number of environmental concerns surrounding this project which must be addressed as the project progresses through the planning and licencing system. These include, but are not limited to: impact on marine geomorphology; shipping and access to Swansea docks and surrounding rivers; fish mortality; water quality and sewage management. Providing these issues are dealt with, we would welcome this project’s potential to radically improve Wales’ renewable energy generation capacity and bring greater economic development to the Swansea Bay region. If the current tidal range projects are judged to be environmentally safe by Natural Resources Wales and the Planning Inspectorate, and are proven not have adverse effects on the surrounding environment after construction, the Welsh Liberal Democrats see no reason why the concept could not be extended to new projects in Welsh waters. In conclusion, we believe there to be a number of benefits within the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon proposals. We hope that the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon proposal will provide the template for the roll out of further energy infrastructure in our region, infrastructure that will lead to economic regeneration and a growth in renewable energy, should the above concerns be suitably addressed. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Ledwood Mechanical Engineering Limited
"I am submitting this representation for and on behalf of Ledwood Mechanical Engineering Limited (LMEL) in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal (TLSB). LMEL are a privately owned company based in the SA72 area of Pembroke, our values are to promote Honesty; Integrity; whist focusing on People and the Environment. The company currently operates in the Oil, Gas, Power and renewable sectors, in both national and international markets. We are pleased to be one of the main privately owned employers within our region, employing circa 300 employees all of which well exceed minimum wage salaries. LMEL have an extensive portfolio of skills that have developed during our 30 years of operation, working for top quartile international clients based in the UK and overseas. Our core skills include engineering/design, procurement, fabrication, construction, operation & maintenance support activities. Due to the ever diminishing business opportunities in our traditional oil & gas domestic markets we continue to focus on a strategy that will under pin our company values for providing growth and sustainability in an Environmentally compliant manner LMEL firmly believe that the TLSB project is an investment opportunity that is very much needed for the Swansea region to help the energy supply chain security, job creation and enhancement of the architecture that has suffered from a lack of investment since the demise of the entire SA1 area. LMEL ‘s participation in the project as a result of our capacity, capability & physical location to the project would support our strategic aims & goals including growth & sustainability. We believe that there are opportunities for the creation of in excess of 50 new jobs and in excess of 100 jobs being secured. We also have a significant amount of sub-contractors that are based in our immediate industry cluster and further afield that would benefit from this project. The TLSB project is an integration of proven technologies, taking advantage of the abundance of natural resource (water) in manner that ensures sustainability of the environment, with the benefit of producing many other facilities the area has had a demand for during the past few decades, some such facilities include leisure activities for physically & mentally challenged people, providing national & international events. I wish to conclude that having lived all my life in Swansea, I have experienced many changes, both in terms of employment opportunities and investment to infrastructure. The region has lacked employment opportunities since the closure of some blue chip/anchor companies in the late 80’s , the TLSB would be the first project of this type of investment in the immediate area for many decades. The TSLB will be a flag ship for a new global industry creating huge employment opportunities within the immediate area and further afield. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mike Hedges AM
"Support the General Principle Believe the science and Engineering are proven Only concern Need to ensure the safe passage of migratory fish"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Parsons Brinckerhoff
"As the lead consultants for the Government's Severn Tidal Power Feasibility Study, completed in 2010, we assembled a large evidence base that we believe is invaluable for the understanding of how tidal power projects can best be developed in the Bristol Channel and Severn Estuary. One of the conclusions that emerged from that study was the relative performance of tidal lagoons compared with tidal barrages. This informed subsequent work that we have undertaken in developing tidal lagoon designs for the Severn Estuary at Aberthaw (600MW Stepping Stones Lagoon) and Bridgwater Bay (extending the work we undertook in 2010 for the 3,600MW Bridgwater Bay Lagoon). Although we have not been directly involved in the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon, we welcome the fact that it has been promoted and submitted to the Planning Inspectorate for consideration. We are particularly keen to ensure that all promoters of tidal lagoon projects in the Bristol Channel and elsewhere present credible, well engineered schemes that can be financed and developed in the short term and that have long lives that enable the long term benefits of lagoons to be appreciated by society and consumers, as well as being acceptable in environmental terms. Credible development will facilitate development of further schemes by the same or different developers. We therefore believe the critical issues for the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon will be: - durability of the design to ensure a long asset life of 120 years in common with other marine structures - a sound financing plan with realistic and achievable assumptions - environmentally acceptable, particularly in relation to fish passage We have not yet reviewed the documentation in detail but as and when we do we shall be using the above principles to inform any further comments we may have. We believe that Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon have undertaken an excellent public dissemination process and we reconfirm our support for the development of tidal lagoons in the Bristol Channel as a credible means of generating energy from the tides."
Ymgyngoreion Statudol Eraill
Public Health England
"PHE, which includes PHE’s Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards (Wales), have evaluated the submitted Environmental Statement (dated February 2014). On the basis of the submitted documentation, PHE does not wish to raise any objection, subject to the following comments: • The vicinity in which the development is to take place has a history of poor air quality hence the establishment of 3 AQMAs within as 6km radius of the site (closest being 2km). Whilst the submitted ES addresses air quality considerations and rationale during the construction period (completion planned 2019) and activities regarding the day to day running of the barrage, there is no consideration as to the impact the projected 100,000 visitors per annum will have on local air quality. 45% of the expected road traffic volume is expected to be E to W concentrated on major arterial route/s into Swansea yet there is no assessment (albeit projected) on what impact this additional volume of traffic will have on local air quality. • PHE notes that a number of developments in the vicinity of the proposed scheme are currently under construction or are planned for the future. The submitted documentation does not appear to assess or consider the cumulative impacts of these developments on local air quality or the effect on baseline air quality levels. • It has been noted that the possible impact of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of the project proposal on human health has not been addressed in the Environmental Statement. In a previous response, PHE has requested that possible impacts of EMFs be estimated and for details of how these will be mitigated (if any). PHE has provided guidance for addressing these impacts in the scoping response (1st November 2012). If you wish to discuss any of these issues or require any additional explanation please do not hesitate to contact us. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Sustrans Cymru
"Sustrans is a charity that promotes Sustainable Transport, notably walking and cycling as active travel for everyday journeys. Our principal interest in this project is its potential to enhance the amenity value of the coastal regeneration taking place within the Swansea Bay area and ensure suitable walking and cycling links from National Cycle Route 4 (Celtic Trail) such that the site can be accessed by sustainable travel modes and act as a destination in its own right. We are involved in the development of an urban Active Travel network for the Swansea and Neath-Port Talbot areas and wish to ensure any new development within this area takes into account sustainable transport arrangements both within and linking to selected destinations."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Tata Steel Europe on behalf of Tata Steel Europe
"Our representation of interest is founded upon the impacts - positive and/or negative that the project may have in three areas:- a) the socio-economic impact on the community, locally and more distant in the development of the project b) the impact of the project on the infrastructure of the Swansea Bay City Region, including transport infrastructure, including docks c) the possible physical impacts the development of the project may have on the physical aspects of the steelworks site and its vital serving facilities - such as the effect of submarine civil engineering and its impact on the geology of erosion and longshore draft in the Bay area - notably in the Port Talbot docks and harbour area d) the relationship between the community created/influenced by the Tidal Power project - and the pre-existing community of the major industrial site(s) at Port Talbot Our interest in registering is to mitigate known or yet-unknown issues which may develop - and to explore and develop opportunities for the benefit of the whole community "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
University of Wales Trinity Saint David
"I am making a representation on behalf of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. The University of Wales: Trinity Saint David (UWTSD) The UWTSD Group comprises three university locations in Carmarthen, Lampeter and Swansea, a campus in London and further education colleges in Carmarthenshire and Ceredigion. With partners, the UWTSD Group delivers education, skills and work-based learning to over 25,000 learners. The Group has a strong track record of supporting the economic and skills needs across the Swansea Bay City Region and currently delivers commercial training or business support to over 600 organisations and businesses in the public and private sectors. New Waterfront Innovation Quarter UWTSD is planning to relocate much of its activity to SA1 to create an exciting new Waterfront Innovation Quarter where the University will catalyse education, leisure and business opportunities in partnership with the City and County of Swansea and the Welsh Government. Through an open innovation and knowledge exploitation offer, UWTSD aims to attract private sector partners to co-locate within SA1 in key discipline areas such as renewable energy, design and engineering, enterprise and entrepreneurship and the built environment. The University will consolidate and maximise the knowledge connectivity potential of key priority areas identified by Government and be a focal point for the development of applied research and transnational commercial opportunities resulting in new company formation and business developments. Particularly relevant to the Tidal Lagoon proposal will be the location in SA1 of the Faculty of Design and Engineering including the School of Natural and Built Environment and a new School of Architecture as well as the Institute for Sustainable Design and a major activity hub in relation to Sport, Health and Outdoor Education. Supporting Innovation The University aims to contribute towards the transformation of the perception of Swansea as an innovative city by supporting environmentally beneficial innovations which can deliver clear economic and commercial benefits such as the tidal lagoon. The P?yry Management Consulting report ‘Levelised Costs of Power from Tidal Lagoons’ submitted in evidence makes it clear that tidal lagoon power projects could be cheaper than offshore wind and have an assumed operating life of 120 years. This very long asset life means consumers will continue to benefit from this cheap electricity for many years which would help to reduce the overall risk of deploying sufficient low-carbon generation to meet the UK’s longer term energy security and environmental goals. The University will look to work with the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay to create a critical mass of expertise and technology that can act as a magnet for attracting new companies, partnerships and investment to support the regeneration of the City and region. Conclusion In conclusion, I believe that the proposal will benefit local, regional and national economies and offers UWTSD the opportunity to work in co-location with Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay to lead the world in tidal lagoon technologies and build a new innovative industry for a lower carbon future. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Wales Green Party
"The Green Party of Wales is very supportive of a low impact, low carbon Tidal Lagoon in Swansea Bay, and believes that energy creation by this means is an important contribution to the future power needs of Wales. We believe that this undertaking is forward thinking, and shows commitment to the type of clean and renewable investments vital for our transition to true sustainability. We have canvassed the opinion of local residents, and every one of the people we have spoken to has been supportive, and importantly feels that the lagoon will bring worthwhile benefits to tourism and marine life, as well as creating useable clean power for local communities. Proceeds from this venture should not just be limited to ‘Big Ticket’ shareholders. Community ownership is an important part of sustainable energy installations, and we would like to see more community involvement with the formulation of community share schemes whereby micro shareholders can form a community block purchase allowing people of small incomes to enjoy financial returns. Some concerns which, although small, do require addressing are: 1. What contingency plans are in place in the event of an oil spill? 2. Who will be responsible for the collection of litter both in the lagoon itself and on the internal and external sides? 3. Will the lagoon require dredging when in use? 4. Will there be information sites along the route explaining in real time tidal states, water quality, air and sea pollution levels and power generation stats? 5. Will there be provision for disabled access in the form of electric wheelchairs or similar. It would be a great irony of the future if man-made structures such as this will be one of the few ways in which marine biodiversity can be protected. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Turley on behalf of Western Power Distribution
"WPD has the following apparatus within the area proposed for development: • 11kV Substation and cables near National Grid substation at Baglan Bay • 11kV and 33kV cables crossing within the development boundary for a short distance near the National Grid Substation • 2 Substations (Pole Mounted), 11kV and LV cables at Fabian Way and Jersey Marine • 11kV substation and cables at Port Tennant Sewage Works • 11kV and LV cables in road and land near Port Tawe Hotel • 11kV substation and cables at Tawe Barrage Lock • Other sites with minor assets within the redline boundary WPD would normally seek to retain the position of electricity circuits operating at 132,000 Volts (132kV) and 66,000 Volts (66kV) and in some cases 33,000 Volts (33kV), particularly if the diversion of such circuits placed a financial obligation on WPD to either divert or underground them. WPD would not be party to any planning or development consent application and any financial obligation would also go against the statutory and regulatory requirement on WPD to operate an economic and efficient electricity distribution system. During and following any development, WPD will require access to its substations, overhead lines and underground cables. Development over or in close proximity to underground cables or substations will require further analysis and confirmation from WPD as to suitability before it proceeds. Assuming access is available and the required minimum statutory clearances can be maintained to its overhead lines, WPD does not generally have any restriction on development in proximity to its strategic overhead lines but it would be sensible for the layout of the development to take WPD's requirements into account. WPD also need to be consulted prior to construction to ensure safety requirements in relation to working in close proximity to electricity lines/plant are met. Should the above apparatus be affected by the development, WPD would seek an agreement with the developers to either modify the development plans or agree to protect or divert these assets. WPD intend to enter into such an agreement prior to the commencement of development. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Anthony Colburn
"Negative visual impact on Oyestermouth in Particular and Swansea west in general will have detrimental effect on Tourism. Blocking of Tide flow will silt up Swansea Dock and Neath river enterances. Tide hight between Lagoon wall and Oyestermouth sea wall could cause flooding in bad weather."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Geldards LLP on behalf of Baglan Bay Company Limited (company number 06383208)
"Baglan Bay Company Limited (“BBCL”) is jointly owned by Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council, The Prince’s Foundation for Building Community and St Modwen Developments Limited (“SMD”). BBCL has a supervisory and monitoring role deriving from the disengagement by BP plc from a series of land holdings around Swansea Bay used for chemical manufacture and for storage and terminal activities. BBCL is part of the legacy arrangements to ensure the observance of the land remediation standards specified by BP when it selected SMD to carry out the remediation and disposal for development of surplus BP assets at Llandarcy and around Swansea Bay. BBCL is interested in the sites that are subject to the supervisory and monitoring arrangements by virtue of options and restrictions imposed to enable BBCL to carry out its role. These sites include areas of land that are subject to the compulsory purchase provisions of the DCO and lie principally within the Grid Connection Land. Parts of the areas in which BBCL is interested have already been remediated to the high standards required by BP and statutory bodies, including the site of the Swansea University Bay Campus which is currently under construction, while other areas are in the process of remediation. Considerable care and effort has gone into the design, execution and management of the remedial works. BBCL accordingly objects to the use of any land in which it is interested for the scheme, particularly the Grid Connection Land in any manner that risks: • Compromising the integrity of the remediation works already carried out, or • Mobilising contaminants in ground where remediation is not yet complete. Given its specialised role BBCL has no view of the desirability of the scheme. However, BBCL does require undertakings and indemnities from the applicant to ensure that works proposed to be carried out on land subject to BBCL’s supervision and monitoring are carried out and maintained in a manner that takes account of the nature of the land and the standards of remediation which have been or are in the course of being applied to it. BBCL’s requirements have been set out in greater detail in its response to the applicant’s consultation under section 42. BBCL has not received any response from the applicant to those requirements and must accordingly maintain its objection to the scheme. As its interests are subject to compulsory purchase to which it objects, BBCL requests that arrangements are made during the Examination for a CPO oral hearing. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Brian Burgess
"Swansea's greatest asset is its circular sweeping Bay from the mouth of the river Tawe to Mumbles. Since the cleaning up of our coastal waters Swansea has consistently held Blue Flag status, and has become a desirable investment area for the Swansea Bay Region. Swansea City currently supports a population of over 250,000, many of which live and trade within visual and physical contact of the Bay, resulting in a strong bond both socially and commercially, and reflecting this success, the Bay area currently generates tourism revenues of £330million supporting 5300 tourism jobs. My objections to the proposals are based on the following : VISUAL IMPACT:Considering the above introduction, this proposal if approved, would result in the visual aspect of our iconic Bay being lost forever, with the Bays width being linearly reduced by a 4storey high lagoon wall stretching to over half the distance from the east pier to Mumbles Head. WATER QUALITY: The Bay is currently Blue Flag status. The Swansea sewage treatment works outfall is to be contained within the Lagoon area,despite objections,and even after full treatment and UV disinfection the outfall will still release significant numbers of indicator organisms. Tidal flows around the Bay will significantly change bringing about change in the deposition of sand , and even a slight change in the intertidal area could result in the surf zone and swimming areas being more turbid, allowing bacteria and viruses to live longer and result in poorer water quality, this would also impact upon the two designated SSSI within the Bay. LAGOON WALL CONSTRUCTION: The proposals indicate the use of Geotubes which are to be filled with 5million cubic metres of dredged material to form the foundation and walls of the lagoon. This dredged material will be polluted with heavy metals including Cadmium and Lead from the toxic waste of Swansea's smelting industries throughout the 1700/1800's Concern here is the initial adverse effect caused by the disturbance of this toxic material and the potential ongoing leakage over time of this material from the Geotubes. Further, we are informed that Geotubes have never been used in a extreme tidal location such as Swansea and certainly not in tidal surges experienced in January/February 2014. In the Developers application for DCO, and on the subject of Geotubes, they suggest an alternative, with the construction core being by way of imported dredged sand and gravel. There is a question to ask here and that given the current legal control, and in instances cessation of dredging in the area, where would this vast amount of material be sourced? RISK OF FLOODING: The greatest risk here is to the Mumbles foreshore not only through silting process, but also through increased wave height and tidal flows due to the effect in narrowing of the Bay. A further grave concern must be additional effect of the severe storms and tidal surges of January/February 2014. MARINE HABITAT: Complete destruction of a significant Herring spawning ground which supports a 350 Grebe colony. The high mortality of fish entering the turbines including migratory Salmon. The effect on Harbour Porpoise and Grey Seal populations."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Cape Farewell
"The Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay will be the first of it's kind globally but importantly, it will be the first power station that is a social and cultural resource. Cape Farewell has worked in partnership with the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay Company for the past three years. It was realised from the onset that the success of the lagoon would be dependent on getting the city of Swansea and the surrounding communities and industry to embrace the concept and want to be involved in it's success. Together we worked with the cultural platforms from the area, the science research departments and the arts departments of the Universities, with local schools, with the regional council and Welsh governments, explaining the concept and reality of the Tidal Lagoon and listening to their concerns and their ambitions, both of which have informed the evolution of the proposed lagoon. We have, in partnership, held public meetings, workshops with informed practitioners, made films and produced drawings and concept ideas. The Tidal Lagoon, we believe, will be an enormous asset to the Swansea bay communities, it is well documented how it will be used by each of the professional and social communities, it has the chance to become a famous landmark attracting inward tourism and economy, but it is also an emblem of future possibility and will align the region as a forward looking, dynamic economic and progressive community whist still upholding it's traditional past as a major sea-facing city and environment. As a functional machine, it addresses one of our societies greatest challenge, how to provide a non-carbon energy resource that in turn will help to protect our environment and mediate the forces of Climate Change. This challenge cannot be over estimated, climate change will affect us all and is something very difficult to address without having a detrimental effect on other parts of our local and global societies. We have worked solidly with the local professional and social communities of Swansea, the lagoon is backed up by the best of the engineers available to be absolutely sure it will deliver as specified, and that environmental concerns are known and have been addressed. Cape Farewell has worked in this field for over 14 years and this is the first workable solution to the climate challenge that has no negatives, it is an inspired step forward that will produce the clean energy we need and be a social and cultural benefit to all the local communities. It will have a beauty of it's own and will become a beckon of future possibility. The Cape Farewell foundation was initiated to work with Climate Scientists to deliver their urgent information on Climate Change. By working with the creative industries, we could evolve a different language that engages the public with a human scale, public facing dialogue. For the past six years we have moved our focus from addressing the realities of climate change to working towards solutions, working to address public concerns and give a vision of what is possible if and when we embrace the climate challenge. The Tidal Bay Swansea Lagoon does just that, it is a future solution that engages the public concerns and offers good clean energy that will also be an asset for tourism, research, education, the arts and for commerce. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
David Kay
"My interests are in water quality effects and the prediction of health risk."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Gwent Angling Society
"The angling club that I represent has leased fishing rights on both the Rivers Wye and Usk. Those rights entitle our members to fish for trout and migratory salmonoids such as sea trout and salmon. Both these species which travel these rivers in order to spawn both feed and migrate along the South Wales coast line as well as other areas of the sea surrounding the UK. Any obstruction to flowing waters from other rivers effect the ability of migratory fish to find the river of their birth and any obstruction to the natural flow of any river in the area of South Wales and adjoining seas could have a detrimental effect on the struggling populations of both salmon, sea trout and protected species such as shad that spawn in the Rivers Wye and Usk."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Lucy Kelly
"I fully support the proposal providing all the environmental impacts of the proposal are properly mitigated. I think it will be great to receive electricty generated by this renewable resource and also the benefits in terms of providing sporting and recreational activities will serve to enhance Swansea. My only reservation is the apparent lack of a pedestrian link from the site to the City Centre & Marina. I do not own a car by choice, and from my understanding there is little or no pedestrian walkways to the City Centre. I would urge the developer to try and provide suitable pedestrian and cycle links to ensure that this project is as sustainable as it can be. Thank you."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Office of Martin Horwood MP on behalf of Martin Horwood MP
"This representation is on behalf of: Martin Horwood- Member of Parliament for Cheltenham Stephen Williams- Member of Parliament for Bristol West Tessa Munt- Member of Parliament for Wells and Co-Chair of the Liberal Democrat Parliamentary Party Committee for Energy and Climate Change In 2009 the Liberal Democrats produced a Severn Tidal Forum Report and position paper on the development of tidal power. This paper supported maximising energy production in the Severn estuary, advocated an incremental approach and called for urgent development of a pilot lagoon to the seaward side of the potential Shoots barrage. In this context the Liberal Democrats of the Severn Estuary are delighted to finally witness an economically, socially and environmentally viable scheme to be put forward for consideration. We believe that the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon represents an essential first step towards maximising low carbon energy generation from within the Severn Estuary. The project is significant for various reasons: Carbon reduction o In just three years the proposal will be carbon neutral and after that it will deliver an estimated 236,000 tonnes of CO2 savings annually. Energy supply and security o The project will have an annual power output of 495 gigawatt hours. This means it will provide enough clean power for approximately 120,000 homes, equivalent to 9% of Wales’ domestic electricity consumption. Jobs o The project will provide 1,850 full time equivalent jobs during construction, up to 60 in operation and 90 in leisure. Public Support o The project has received 86% local support, which is significant for such a big proposal. Economic regeneration o Cardiff Business School has assessed that against a total capital expenditure of £756m, £299m could be spent in Wales. Tidal Lagoon Power has also created Wales Tidal Lagoon Industry Group to work with industry and try to ensure that Welsh industry is set up to achieve an even higher percentage of overall spend than is predicted. Social amenity o The project will deliver an and exciting public amenity. Much more than a power station, it is something with which the public can engage and which they can enjoy. Anticipated leisure activities include walking, cycling, running, a variety of water contact sports, angling, bird-watching and triathlon. Conservation o The project is a new opportunity to bolster wildlife conservation projects, with a specific conservation strategy written into it. Coastal Defence o With potential for use in flood defence, the project is a material way to adapt to the local impact of a changing climate at the same time as mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. In conclusion, we consider the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon proposal to provide the template for the roll out of further energy infrastructure in our region, infrastructure that will lead to economic regeneration and stimulate a flagship international industry centred around South Wales and the South West of England. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mrs Jill Burgess
"Swansea's greatest asset is its circular sweeping Bay from the mouth of the river Tawe to Mumbles. Since the cleaning up of our coastal waters Swansea has consistently held Blue Flag status, and has become a desirable investment area for the Swansea Bay Region. Swansea City currently supports a population of over 250,000, many of which live and trade within visual and physical contact of the Bay, resulting in a strong bond both socially and commercially, and reflecting this success, the Bay area currently generates tourism revenues of £330million supporting 5300 tourism jobs. My objections to the proposals are based on the following : VISUAL IMPACT:Considering the above introduction, this proposal if approved, would result in the visual aspect of our iconic Bay being lost forever, with the Bays width being linearly reduced by a 4storey high lagoon wall stretching to over half the distance from the east pier to Mumbles Head. WATER QUALITY: The Bay is currently Blue Flag status. The Swansea sewage treatment works outfall is to be contained within the Lagoon area,despite objections,and even after full treatment and UV disinfection the outfall will still release significant numbers of indicator organisms. Tidal flows around the Bay will significantly change bringing about change in the deposition of sand , and even a slight change in the intertidal area could result in the surf zone and swimming areas being more turbid, allowing bacteria and viruses to live longer and result in poorer water quality, this would also impact upon the two designated SSSI within the Bay. LAGOON WALL CONSTRUCTION: The proposals indicate the use of Geotubes which are to be filled with 5million cubic metres of dredged material to form the foundation and walls of the lagoon. This dredged material will be polluted with heavy metals including Cadmium and Lead from the toxic waste of Swansea's smelting industries throughout the 1700/1800's Concern here is the initial adverse effect caused by the disturbance of this toxic material and the potential ongoing leakage over time of this material from the Geotubes. Further, we are informed that Geotubes have never been used in a extreme tidal location such as Swansea and certainly not in tidal surges experienced in January/February 2014. In the Developers application for DCO, and on the subject of Geotubes, they suggest an alternative, with the construction core being by way of imported dredged sand and gravel. There is a question to ask here and that given the current legal control, and in instances cessation of dredging in the area, where would this vast amount of material be sourced? RISK OF FLOODING: The greatest risk here is to the Mumbles foreshore not only through silting process, but also through increased wave height and tidal flows due to the effect in narrowing of the Bay. A further grave concern must be additional effect of the severe storms and tidal surges of January/February 2014. MARINE HABITAT: Complete destruction of a significant Herring spawning ground which supports a 350 Grebe colony. The high mortality of fish entering the turbines including migratory Salmon. The effect on Harbour Porpoise and Grey Seal populations."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Prof J. Hunt
" I am an emeritus professor of climate modelling in dept of earth sciences university college London, and formerly was director general of the UK Meteorological Office. I have written extensively on issues connected with climate change , its mitigation and adaptation . I have particularly studied the variability of wind , solar radiation and waves and their effects on renewable energy systems. I am concerned that on and offshore wind systems are likely to be increasingly subject to extended periods of weeks or even months with low wind andor low solar radiation, as a result of longer blocking periods that are characteristic of climate as it is affected by man made global warming. Consequently it is vital that the uk has reliable and low cost, low carbon electricity supplies , which in practice means nuclear and tidal and perhaps wave power. The studies for the Swansea tidal lagoon appear to be reliable . The structure seems to be strong enough to survive over many decades .The economics appear to be predictable (I attended a briefing at Westminster on the project). These are the reasons why I support this project and planning application "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Richard Watkins
"We write in support of the planning proposals for the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon. We support the potential for the lagoon to provide 9% of Wales’ energy needs from a reliable, renewable source of energy in the tides of Swansea Bay. We believe that this development should gain consent due to its contribution to mitigating the effects of climate change, as per the aims of EU, National and Welsh policy. As business leaders, we support the economic benefits for Swansea Bay that the Lagoon would bring, in terms of: the direct jobs from construction and operation; the attraction of tourists to the area; the impact of the £750-£850 million capital investment on the region; and the garnering of a new Lagoon industry based in South Wales. Based on the Project's ability to mitigate the effects of climate change and its local and wider economic value, we believe that the benefits of this development are multiple and can mean that the project means something positive for everyone in Swansea Bay and Wales. Additionally: We support this project and its objective to produce renewable energy from the tides of Swansea Bay, as it clearly aligns with many of the aims of our organisation. In terms of world development, the production of energy from tidal power, i.e. a non-fossil fuel source, reduces the impact of fossil fuels on developing nations, through reducing the effects of climate change (desertification, flooding and other extreme weather events) and reducing the need to exploit their ever decreasing resources. It is quite clear that the effects of climate change will be felt most keenly by the poorest people on the planet, who lack the ability and resources to adapt to the changing patterns in our weather. The reduction of CO2 emissions resulting from the switch to renewable energy such as that in Swansea Bay, and away from fossil fuels, will also slow down ocean acidification, a silent threat to the food security of many of the world’s poor, who, as coastal–dwellers, are dependent on shellfish and seafood in general, for their protein. The Lagoon is a strongly positive project for the environment and we are pleased to support it as such. It will help reduce greenhouse gas emissions for Wales, which in 2010 stood at 46.6Mt, of which 35% resulted from the supply of energy[i]. In addition, as Wales currently imports a large percentage of coal, the project will have additional global benefits directly through reducing shipping emissions and indirectly yet more powerfully, by protecting standing forests that can be easily (and quickly) destroyed through mining for coal. Support for avoided deforestation is one of the Foundation’s key goals with respect to the environment and TLSB will play a positive role in reducing loss of forest. As we know, Wales made its fortune from the sale and export of its coal, to power the industrial revolution. It seems only fitting that Wales should now be the location for the first tidal lagoon, to harness the renewable energy from the Welsh seas, thereby making energy with no carbon emissions, which will go some way to making up for all the carbon previously exported and burnt. At a more local scale, the project will benefit the immediate environment of the Swansea Bay area , by protecting the foreshore enclosed by the lagoon, and countering the damage to the area that has resulted from the historic industrial activity on the Docks. It will also provide new habitat for fish and crustaceans on the lagoon wall itself, and through kelp beds which are important nursery breeding grounds for fish stocks, thereby supporting local fisheries. Its plans to see the reintroduction of the native Swansea Bay oysters will not only increase biodiversity and boost the local fishing industry, it will also provide good local nutrition for the people of Wales, as oysters contain extremely high levels of zinc, an often missing mineral yet vital for our immune systems. The Foundation’s Child Development Fund supports research into diet and the impact on mental and physical health. Eating fish and seafood is now widely accepted as key to good mental well-being. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Steve Kidwell
"I am a director of an SME (Enscom Ltd) based in Swansea. The company is a relatively new chartered surveying and construction company which currently concentrates its efforts on domestic energy reduction measures. We work mostly with domestic customers to reduce energy costs in relation to their homes. The work is carried out by a number of medium sized local building firms employing significant numbers of local people. Over the last 18 months Enscom has supported 800 householders to reduce their energy costs. This translates into approx. £8m in terms of physical works carried out by local contracting firms in terms of income generated within the Swansea bay area. I would wish to comment positively in relation to the TLSB proposal, a proposal which I believe complements the work of my company. We are both directly involved in creating efficiency in the using energy for the benefit of the residents of Swansea Bay. This is a long term and massively creditable project which will involve small and large companies and will benefit the economy of the area enormously. I would consider the TLSB project to be at the pinnacle of this important work given that the project will provide carbon savings in excess of 236,000 tonnes per year, contributing to the commitments made by the UK to reduce emissions at the international level. I understand that the lagoon will produce 9% of Wales’ domestic energy needs, equivalent to 120,000 homes. This makes a contribution to mitigating against the impacts of the loss of generation capacity due to the implementation of the Industrial Emissions Directive, while also fulfilling the aims of the ETS and Promotion of renewable energy sources directives. On a more personal basis I have lived in Swansea for 57 years. Speaking to my colleagues, family and friends, who also live and work within the area, there is a clear consensus that the bay is hugely significant to each of us in different ways. There is a general feeling that the opportunity presented by the lagoon should not be missed. The potential benefits to employment, tourism, sport, local economy and the environment are huge. The lagoon will provide recreational facilities through the provision of open space which can be used for walking and cycling and the Boating centre will provide access to national standard sailing facilities. I believe that the lagoon will encourage people of all ages to participate in walking, cycling and Watersports. Every effort should be made to encourage public participation in the development of this project, a project that will be our legacy to future generations. Steve Kidwell MRICS, FCIOB, FCABE, DEA Director at Enscom Ltd "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Swansea Environmental Forum
"Swansea Environmental Forum is a strategic partnership for the built and natural environment we are very much aware of the threats of climate change and the need to produce more of our energy from renewable technology. We therefore generally support the generation of energy from tidal power. However we would like to submit relevant representations. As a Forum we may wish to submit comments on the following sections from “Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay application for a development consent order”: Sections 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3 7.3, 8.3, and 8.4. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Swansea University on behalf of Swansea University
"1. Environmental aspects (i) The lagoon The shelter from the wave environment provided by TLSB will prevent sediment transport which could result in a muddy foreshore. Geotubes used in the construction process will be filled with potentially contaminated materials obtained through the dredging process. The geofabric is at risk of leaking such materials and no testing of such materials in a marine environment has been undertaken to assess this risk. Tidal flushing of the environment following major sewage outfall into the lagoon during severe storms may be prevented by the TLSB. (ii) The local environment Insufficient assessment has been made of the effect upon the nearby SSSI at Crymlyn Burrows or the dunes at Baglan Bay. There have been no proposals for a long term, post-construction programme for monitoring the local ecology or mitigating any ecological risks. (iii) The wider environment Changes caused to wave and tidal driven sediment and navigation channels in Swansea Bay should be assessed in greater detail. Having a contained area of over 13 Km2 and a height of 8m at mean tide, TLSB will have significant negative visual effects and consequences for Swansea Bay, particularly the University’s new campus. 2. Construction/Operational Aspects (i) Construction and Operations The Applicant has failed to adequately assess the impact of noise, dust, traffic and nuisance that will be caused to the University’s new campus. This is also true of several operational issues. The proposed rock armour is significantly less than that involved at Neath/Port Talbot. The data on which this armour is based has not been disseminated. (iii) Decommissioning Inadequate detail has been provided in relation to the decommissioning process of both the plant and the wall at the end of the proposed 125 year long lease, including its funding. The lack of detail causes great concern due to the serious negative impact upon the environment and aesthetics of the area. If left, TLSB could fall into disrepair and responsibility for its upkeep is unspecified. Further suggestions have been made in respect of continued use as an offshore generating station beyond the term of the initial lease. It is not possible to assess the scope of this proposal based on the terms of the current Application. 3. Costs, Financial Model and Funding Structure Insufficient detail has been provided to assess the viability of the financial model. TLSB has indicated the high level of uncertainty in this aspect and the reliance upon a wide range of uncertain variables for example Contract for Difference strike prices. The funding structure, including cash flow during development, has not been clarified. As such, the commercial viability of the project is unquantifiable. 4. Compulsory Acquisition The compulsory acquisition of the interested party’s interests specified in the Book of Reference is unnecessary and provides powers to the Applicant which go beyond those which are required to facilitate the proposed development. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Usk Fishing Association
"The Usk Fishing Association is the organisation that represents all 148 fishery owners on the river and tributaries of the River Usk. The Usk River is an SSSI and SAC and is currently on the that risk register within NRW/Welsh Government. We in the Usk Valley are concerned that it will harm our stocks of salmon and sea trout, using the Bristol channel and passing near to the proposed scheme thereby detrimentally affecting the value of our fishery. This is likely to arise as a result of: - massive, unnatural flows in and out of Swansea Bay interfering with normal migration routes and behaviour particulary those migrating fish travelling towards the Wye and Usk Cathcment. Fish swim along the sides of the estury and not the middle. the concerns are: - fish (smolts, returning adults and kelts) being drawn into the turbines and killed; - fish being drawn through the turbines into the impoundment and trapped; - fish being driven away from the area by unfavourable conditions. Supported by some of the local clubs and the Angling Trust, Fish Legal commissioned an independent expert fisheries analysis (attached), one of the key points of which is that "Due to extensive movement of migratory salmonids along the South Wales coast there is potential for populations of more rivers to be impacted than currently included within the far-field zone." The report says "Because coastal movements appear to be extensive more fish will be potentially exposed to Lagoon encounters than suggested in the Report. These potential effects may not be trivial collectively, because although proportionally far fewer salmon from say the river Wye will be exposed than Tawe or Neath fish, the abundance of salmon and sea trout in some of the South Wales rivers is much higher than in the nominal target rivers; the Wye, Usk and Tywi being notable. While the direction of error is clear the amount however, is not. It is not possible to predict with any certainty what proportion of say Wye salmon or Tywi sea trout will be exposed. It is likely however, that repeat encounters will arise, especially in the case of sea trout which are multiple spawners (they spawn and re-migrate to sea several times in their life time) and their migrations are more coastal that salmon, involving feeding on coastally abundant pelagic prey species. Recent genetic and microchemistry studies (from the Celtic Sea Trout Project) on sea trout exchange in the Irish Sea (which extended only to the Tywi) suggest that movements maybe extensive." No science based facts have been made available to prove that turbines do not destroy fish and more importantly no research has proven that lagoons do not effect the migration of fish, current operational research has proved fish safety to the contary. The state of nature report for wales concluded that nearly all rivers in Wales are not reaching their conservation levels, they are failing in their bio diversity targets, the water framework directive is failing as is the habitats directive. There can be no reason based upon European and UK legislation that this project should be allowed ot go ahead, even taking in to account and giving regard to Ecomonic and Social factors based upon the 3 pillars of sustainability. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Active Supporters Group Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay on behalf of Active Supporters Group Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay
"My name is Mr Chris Kelly and I am Chairman of the Swansea centre Active supporters Group (ASG) and am making representations on behalf of this group, which is 370 members strong. When the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay company started their consultation they sent 195,000 questionnaires and participants were invited to declare their interest in being “active supports” and some 1,000 people so declared. These groups were then geographically divided and I represent the “Swansea” group. We communicate mainly by e-mail and I have had several responses from the first newsletter issued some weeks ago. The main theme of these responses has been very positive indeed and the most common features were:- • Using the power of nature to supply energy. • Acknowledging the consistency of this energy supply. • Pride in the fact that Swansea is leading the world being the first tidal lagoon. • Acknowledging the number of employment opportunities created during the construction stage and the ongoing employment. • Excitement about the variety of uses in the lagoon. • Looking forward to the facilities created by the lagoon for the general public including:- o Cycling & running the 9.5 kilometre path o Swimming in the lagoon o Yachting in the lagoon o SCUBA diving o Possible wind kite activities • Education ties with primary secondary & higher education institutes. • The facilities of the “Oyster” facility on the wall as well as its design. • The opportunity for a variety of art installations that may become iconic statements. • Increase tourism in the area adding to the attraction of Swansea & district. As well as the above there are many charities and organisations in the Swansea region who could benefit substantially from the building of the lagoon and associated benefit funds and opportunities that could arise. Many of these have already declared their interest.. Another benefit from the lagoon is the potential reduction in electricity costs to residents in the immediate area. Another very well supported aspect of the lagoon is the fact that some 65% of materials and expertise will be sourced in UK and 50% of the total from Wales. The ongoing potential for further lagoons in the UK and possibly the world also offer potential employment opportunities for suppliers in Wales well into the future. I have also received positive support from the community of “alternative” energy interests. A very telling comment related to the possibility that 5 lagoons equate to 6 Nuclear power stations and that lagoons have a 120 years life expectancy with little “redundancy” costs, considerably longer life than nuclear power stations and with relatively minimal, if any, redundancy issues. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Andritz Hydro GmbH, Ravensburg, Germany
"ANDRITZ Hydro, one of the global leaders supplying electromechanical equipment and services for hydropower plants, `From water to wire´ has great interest in supporting the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB) proposal. ANDRITZ Hydro’s range of products and services covers the supply of equipment and services for new hydropower plants as well as for the refurbishment and overhaul of existing facilities around the world. Our experience in supplying hydro turbine runners is over 170 years representing over 30.000 units generating more than 400.000 MW. We employ in excess of 7.400 people in over 50 locations on every continent. For the TLSB project we intend to deliver the Turbine equipment, providing the following benefits to our business and our involvement will also provide benefits to the TLSB proposal. One of our goals is to provide well proven technology combined with an innovative concept for the benefit of all stakeholders of the TLSB project. ANDRITZ Hydro is currently testing a turbine layout in its laboratories which will achieve a good overall economic performance and provide a reliable, green, high annual energy, output. Following the success of our TLSB proposal we will achieve additional knowhow in providing tidal power plants ensuring our leading market position as a reliable, future employer of our personnel. Our concept includes a large portion of local UK content supporting TLSB´s commitment to provide a local supply chain. Initially it will be possible to source components for our turbines from local suppliers within the UK providing a continuous workload for these companies. Subsequently our construction and operation concepts will create new jobs in the Swansea Bay area. Our TLSB proposal will bring a high added value to the city of Swansea and further to UK industry. In the future we expect that the TLSB project will be a prototype for further tidal lagoon projects. This will ensure that the concept of providing reliable and predictable green energy in combination with new recreational facilities will be a major benefit for the Swansea Bay area. Our solutions for renewable energy from water will be one of the main components overcoming the implications of climate change and achieving our energy requirements with increasing renewable sources. This will be a great benefit in the welfare of future generations. Finally, we believe that this project will bring value to every stakeholder. However the highest benefit will be for the Bay area itself bringing much needed job creation and enormous recreational value. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Austwel Ltd
"We support the planning application on the basis that it is commercially and environmentally a positive way forward for Swansea."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
British Sub Aqua Club
"We are making this representation on behalf of the British Sub Aqua Club (BSAC) in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. BSAC is the UK Governing Body for the sport of sub-aqua and represent the views of affiliated members, branches, schools and centres based in the UK and overseas. BSAC is committed to promoting, protecting and representing the interests of all divers and snorkellers throughout the UK. We work in conjunction with the Health & Safety Executive, the Marine Coastguard Association, the RNLI, HM Treasury’s Receiver of Wrecks, DEFRA and other diving agencies to ensure the continued development, safety and enjoyment of scuba diving for all. We also work in partnership with a wide range of conservation and environmental organisations to help safeguard the UK's precious waters and marine life for divers - both now and for future generations - to enjoy. Training and Recreational Facility: The Swansea, Gower and West Wales coastlines sustain a range of diving activities and attract divers with interests in marine conservation and underwater heritage. Suitable locations to train divers are constantly sought by our branches, particularly those with ease of access and controlled conditions to improve safety in diver training whilst maintaining realistic UK diving conditions. Shared Resources: The proposed facilities that may be provided would be beneficial not just to diving groups but also to other water sports organisations and through shared resources would make the recreational experience for many sportsmen and women both effective and efficient at a single location. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Cafe TwoCann
"I am an interested party as we own a Cafe/restaurant business in the SA1 dockland and as such we believe the Tidal Lagoon development will benefit the hospitality and tourism sectors of Swansea."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Carbon Reduction Group Ltd
"Carbon Reduction a Group is a Swansea based company dedicated to the improvement of energy efficiency in local housing stock. One of it's main objectives is to reduce carbon emissions by promoting energy education, better insulation and the use of alternative renewable energy sources. We wholly endorse a local company that will be producing clean, renewable and sustainable energy in our community. Carbon Reduction Group is aiming to be an energy provider within the next twelve months and will be looking as a priority to purchase renewable energy. We hope that the TLSB project encourages other renewable energy producers to come on line and increase the UK market available in renewable electricity and will be keen to see the further developments from Tidal Lagoon Power. Such a high profile and innovative project in our city will naturally increase the education and knowledge of local people in renewable energy and potentially increase the demand for renewable energy supply and application of more energy efficient measures. This ties in with our main objective but we feel strongly that this is the right path to follow as set out by the Government's commitment to the Kyoto Protocol."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Coleg Sir Gar
"I wish to make a positive representation for the project as, on behalf of the organisation I represent- an employer (local to the project) of in excess of 800 staff and an educational establishment with a student cohort in excess of 9500, I believe the benefits arising from the project are hugely significant and will impact positively on the local and regional economy. I firmly believe the project will offer significant employment opportunities for the learners we serve."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Crickhowell and District Angling Society on behalf of Crickhowell and District Angling Society
"Consent to the building of this lagoon may have a detrimental affect on migratory fish in other areas of Wales."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
David Jones
"I fully support the proposal. I think it would be a good thing for the Swansea area as a whole. I think that the introduction of new technology and the proposed visitor centre would help to attract tourists and would also help to portray Swansea as a progressive City particularly with the decline of major industry in the area"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Dr Ian Horsfall
"1 Fish communities in Swansea Bay and particularly pelagic fish that are the food source of overwintering birds. 2 Lack of valid mitigation for loss of herring spawning grounds. 3 Lack of validation of fish movement models used to assess impact on migratory fish in Swansea Bay."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Dwr Cymru Cyfyngedig
"1. D?r Cymru Cyfyngedig (DCC) is a statutory undertaker responsible for providing over three million people with a continuous, high-quality supply of drinking water and for taking away, treating and disposing of wastewater. DCC owns, operates, maintains, improves and extends the system of public sewers, water mains and associated apparatus together with treatment works and pumping stations and has corresponding statutory duties to ensure effectual drainage and for making available supplies of water. DCC’s primary concern within the context of this application for Development Consent therefore is to ensure that statutory obligations are met and the environment is protected. 2. DCC has actively engaged with Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB) during the pre-application stage and has worked proactively with TLSB in the sharing of data and modelling intelligence. To date, DCC understands that studies have not been undertaken to clarify the extent of potential impacts. DCC is undertaking appropriate assessments to ascertain further information and will seek to work collaboratively with TLSB in this context to inform the examination of the application. 3. The specific concerns for DCC include, but are not limited to, the potential impact on: a. existing and future bathing water compliance and shellfish water b. the operation and structure of DCC’s existing long sea outfall, emergency outfalls and other outfalls c. the structural integrity of DCC assets and apparatus both on land and at sea d. DCC’s statutory rights of access to its sewers, watermains and associated apparatus e. DCC’s ability to fulfil its statutory obligations f. DCC’s land and associated rights 4. The application refers to the presence of Swansea Bay Waste water Treatment Works (WwTW) and its associated long sea outfall, 3.5km in length, both of which are located within the Order limits. Swansea Bay WwTW serves a population equivalent of approximately 170,000 within its catchment area and existing permits under the Environmental Permitting (England & Wales) Regulations 2010, granted by Natural Resources Wales, allow DCC to discharge disinfected biologically treated and settled storm effluents via the outfall (whilst ensuring that existing water quality objectives continue to be met). 5. DCC advises that matters relating to discharges from the long sea outfall should be considered carefully by the Examining Authority (ExA) during the examination of this application. The ExA should also consider the impact of new bathing water designations or shellfish monitoring points which may arise as a result of the lagoon’s construction. 6. To address the potential impact of the embayment of the outfall by the lagoon, the application in its current form proposes either the installation of Ultra Violet Treatment at Swansea Bay WwTW (Work no. 8, Part 1 Schedule 1 of the draft DCO) or the extension of the existing long sea outfall to beyond the lagoon wall (identified work no. 3, Part 1 Schedule 1 of the Draft DCO). 7. DCC’s view is that the only viable option in respect of the current outfall is extension beyond the sea wall. This will provide a consistent solution which is resilient to future potential population growth and the effects of climate change. DCC therefore supports the extension of the outfall in accordance with Work no. 3, Part 1, Schedule 1 of the draft DCO and is carrying out detailed design and costings analyses to inform TLSB. 8. The draft DCO in its current form is inconsistent with DCC’s existing statutory rights and obligations. In this context DCC will engage with TLSB to require the redrafting of relevant provisions to avoid conflict with existing statutory provisions. 9. In regard to land proposed to be compulsory acquired DCC will provide further information detailing DCC’s concerns for each affected plot. 10. DCC intends to make detailed representation on the draft DCO during the examination stage of this PA2008 process. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Eileen Strack
"I have been visiting Swansea and the Gower for over 25 years and in recent years have become a more frequent visitor due to our daughter moving there to live. We enjoy visiting Mumbles with all it has to offer frequently walking the promenade up to Knab Rock and enjoying the views across the Bay. We don't feel the same attraction to walking around Swansea feeling that (to our disappointment) Cardiff as a city offers us so much more. We think that if the Tidal Lagoon got the go ahead it would bring about the improvement of Swansea City Centre and the immediate dock area where the lagoon will be located and very much hope that this will be an area that we will come to enjoy on a recreational basis. We are particularly looking forward to walking the lagoon wall and enjoying the view back across the bay towards Mumbles and the lighthouse. We are particularly excited about our grand children being brought up in a city that will be home to the world's first tidal lagoon, we believe that this will bring great benefits in education including school visits for science, environment/nature and sports and potentially offer long term employment opportunities."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Euan Gatfield
"I believe that the project, in potentially kickstarting a series of progressively more economic lagoons, represents good value for the taxpayer over all relevant time periods, while making a valuable contribution towards decarbonising energy generation in the UK. In the short term, the required level of government support is not out of line with offshore wind, while the construction itself will draw on a UK-heavy supply chain capable of stimulating economic activity (and tax receipts). In the medium term the lagoon is expected to be followed by a number of larger schemes requiring progressively lower Cfd strike prices. In the long term (once capital costs have been repaid), given the economic life of the asset is believed to be in the region of 120 years, the lagoon will become an exceptionally low-cost source of energy. The scheme is also capable of becoming a regional attraction in the Swansea Bay area."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
GMB Trade Union - Wales and South West Region
"The GMB's interest and representation in relation to the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay will predominately revolve around the development of high premium and high skilled jobs that in the West Wales area that the Lagoon will create in both the construction and operational phrases going forward. The various visitor attractions that will be the Legacy of the Lagoon will also provide sustainable employment into the future. We are keen to see the encouragement of the local employment in West Wales area as well as development of apprenticeships to these highly skilled jobs."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Intertissue
"The project is showing the need to occupy part of the land that the Company I do work for owns . This land is needed for future development of the Company which will led to creation of new jobs ."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Jack O'Sullivan
"I would like to reserve the opportunity to make a written submission on: a) the marine ecological effects of the proposed tidal barrage, including a comment on whether or not the applicant's Environmental Impact Statement has fully addressed all the relevant issues; and, b) the applicant's view that the proposed tidal barrage, including the installed turbines, will function effectively for the very lengthy period suggested in the applicant's promotional video and descriptive material."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
La Parrilla (restaurant located in SA1) (La Parrilla (restaurant located in SA1))
"As a restaurant owner in Swansea I would like to express my support for the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay project. I own a number of restaurants and bars located in the heart of Swansea City centre with La Parilla based at the J sheds in SA1 and would be the closest of my brasseries to the proposed lagoon. The Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon should be given the go ahead because it makes sense to generate clean renewable energy from a free natural resource, the tide. The location of this type of facility in Swansea I hope would be a major catalyst for further investment and regeneration in Swansea. Swansea is already lagging behind Cardiff as a destination city where local people and visitors enjoy shopping, eating and walking around the many attractions on offer. It would be great to see the same for Swansea, spurred on by it being the location of the world’s first tidal lagoon. The construction proposes to be a great tourist attraction that may attract between 70,000 and 100,000 visitors a year which I’m sure will increase general visitors to Swansea which will be great for local businesses, helping to maintain existing jobs and may give cause to create new jobs for local people. I hope that the location of the lagoon may also bring the continued regeneration to the SA1 area which appears to have lagged in recent years. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Lord Oxburgh of Liverpool
"I believe that this is a project of national importance. The UK has challenging legal obligations to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and to increase the contribution of renewable sources in the energy budget. I have experience in both renewable and non-renewable energy systems and believe that tidal lagoons have the potential to make a significant renewable energy contribution. This would be the first project of its kind in the UK and if this is successful, as I expect, it is likely that the expertise and experience would be in demand in other parts of the country."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Louise James
"I am a local resident who lives in Langland overlooking Mumbles. I fully support the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay project acknowledging that it will have some visual impact on the view across Swansea Bay. I am prepared to accept this visual impact as it is minimal and for me will represent a clean and safe renewable energy generation plant that brings much more that electricity as a benefit. My new view across Swansea Bay from Mumbles will be of a new innovative power generation plant using modern and highly stimulating visual designs for its buildings and construction. This will now obscure the view of Port Talbot, a highly industrial area, consisting of large box buildings with high rise stacks that often have long rising smoke plumes. Both views in my opinion represent both important contributions to Swansea's local economy, job provision and have been or will be important to our heritage. I have high hopes that the Tidal Lagoon being constructed in Swansea will encourage further investment in Swansea City creating a centre that residents can be proud of and one that encourages residents and visitors a like to use it more. Further more I hope that the tidal lagoon exceeds all expectation and that a new tidal lagoon industry is established in Swansea and South Wales and that other renewable energy companies and associated product and service companies want to be based here. With my own young family I want to live in a city that offers great prospects for young people and encourages them to be innovative and pioneering."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Clarke Willmott LLP on behalf of Mapley Steps Limited
"We are instructed by Mapeley STEPS Limited who act on behalf of the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to a Power of Attorney in respect of the land demised under a lease dated 22 July 1998 and made between (1) Associated British Ports and (2) the Secretary of State For the Environment and Transport. Our client appreciates the benefits of the scheme and recognises the capacity of the development to generate renewable energy. Therefore in principle, our client does not object to the proposal. However, our client does have concerns in relation to protecting their rights and the current use of the site. At present the land is sub-let to Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs and is used for car parking and a Road Fuel Testing Unit, which tests fuel that is used at the Port. Our client therefore does use and has an income secured from the land. The use of the site is also integral to the safe/legal operating of the port. It is essential to the use of the land that access is maintained at all hours of the day and is not interrupted at any point. DLA Piper, the solicitors acting on behalf of Tidal Lagoon (Swansea Bay) have indicated in their letter of 31 March 2014 that the development will not “materially interfere with any rights of access enjoyed” by our client in respect of the construction and operation of the Project as access will be maintained via the roads which are the subject of the works or via alternative routes. Our clients ask that this is confirmed within the order to ensure that their right to access will not be interfered with in any regard. In addition to concerns regarding continued access to the land, our client would also like to ensure that their use of the land is not interfered with in anyway whilst the development in carried out. Our client reserves the right to make a claim for compensation following the grant of the DCO. In light of the above, our client does not object to the development but would like the above concerns addressed to ensure that their continued rights and use of the land throughout the construction and operation of the Tidal Lagoon will be unaffected."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mumbles Active Supporters Group
"I am making a representation on behalf of the Mumbles Active Supporters Group (ASG) of which I am Chairman. The Mumbles ASG is comprised of people who have formed a positive view of the project over the Pre-application stage and have registered to be kept up to date with progress on the project. The group has just over 100 members with a wide range of ages and backgrounds all living in the Mumbles area, defined by postcode. Mumbles is an old fishing village located on the western side of Swansea Bay. The proposed TLSB site can be seen across the bay with little visual impact. Mumbles has a thriving community as well as being a popular tourist destination since Victorian times. The district of Mumbles has a population of just over 16,000 people (includes electoral wards of Mayals, Newton, Oystermouth and West Cross) with a village population of 4,000 people. The Mumbles community has been kept informed about the TLSB project through the news media, local exhibitions and presentations. The group believes the TLSB project will be a huge benefit to Mumbles and the wider Swansea Bay area. We have identified the following key benefits: This will be the world’s first tidal lagoon truly producing clean, reliable and renewable energy at a time when the protection of the environment is paramount. Deservedly the project will draw attention to Swansea from all over the world. We believe it will bring additional visitors and tourists to the Swansea Bay area all year round with many economic spin offs. Within the lagoon the planned watersports and leisure facilities will be opportunities for local businesses to develop and create more jobs. As well as being a major tourist attraction the lagoon will help regenerate the old docks area seafront and symbolise Swansea Bay’s long term green ambitions in contrast to its industrial heritage. In addition the tidal lagoon and associated facilities will be an inspirational educational resource available to the local schools, universities and wider community. The lagoon will provide a new and prominent platform to showcase local art and culture. Mumbles used to be famous for its Oyster beds until they expired last century due to over fishing. The planned mariculture farm could provide opportunities for Mumbles to be reconnected with the Oyster trade. Although still under investigation, the possibility of lower cost electricity for the residents of Swansea Bay has excited many members of the ASG. In conclusion the Mumbles ASG members have reviewed the information available. We have formed the strong opinion that the TLSB project will provide not only sustainable energy but also long term economic, educational and cultural benefits to Mumbles and the Swansea Bay area "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mumbles and Gower Tourist Information Centre
"As the main focal hub for Tourism in Mumbles and the Gower area, the prospect of the Tidal Lagoon project and the benefits it may bring are very exciting. We deal with thousands of tourists and their requests for information every month in the summer and to have something like this literally on our doorstep is wonderful. They boost to the economy, tourism and employment will be a welcome breath of fresh air. This could become an iconic attraction both for Swansea bay and Wales if not the UK as a whole. We are very much behind this project and will be happy to promote this to our tourist clients and visitors. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mumbles Forum
"Good luck with the proposed Tidal Lagoon Project for Swansea Bay. Here at Mumbles Forum we are a mixed bunch of businesses, local authority departments and stakeholders in Mumbles in and around the area who come together each month to ‘get things done’. Our loose definition as per our agenda is; To develop a two way communication process between local associations, business and stakeholders in Mumbles and the surrounding area with the common goal of raising the profile of Mumbles. While doing this, helping to creating a more vibrant and pleasant environment for both residents and visitors alike. Some of the main reoccurring areas we are developing and working on at the moment to improve or give ‘added value’ to are; • Tourism • Cleansing • Local transport • Events We, as individuals within the group, are fully committed to helping and supporting this project and what it will do for the area. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mumbles Traders Association
"Mumbles Traders Association is happy to support the Tidal lagoon Project in Swansea Bay. We feel that this project will bring much needed tourism to the area. The lagoon will also become a ‘must see’ for tourists in the UK. We feel the whole concept has been put together respecting the environment, the residence and the heritage of Swansea , its people and the surrounding Swansea Bay area. We feel that this is a once in a lifetime opportunity to develop one of our oldest and greatest assets the bay! We are fully in support of this project. "
Ymgyngoreion Statudol Eraill
National Grid Electricity Transmission Plc and National Grid Gas Plc
"RELEVANT REPRESENTATION Representation by National Grid Electricity Transmission Plc (NGET) to the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay Order National Grid Electricity Transmission has been liaising with the promoter in relation to the impacts of the proposed scheme on its existing apparatus, land interests and rights and will continue to work with the promoter in respect of agreeing a form of appropriate protective provisions in order to allow for the withdrawal of NGET's relevant representation . National Grid Electricity Transmission Infrastructure National Grid Electricity Transmission Plc (NGET) has a high voltage electricity transmission overhead line and a 275kV substation which lie in or within close proximity to the proposed order limits. This overhead line and substation form an essential part of the electricity transmission network in England and Wales. Details of the apparatus are as follows: ? VEA 275kV Overhead Line Route – Baglan Bay to Margam/Baglan Bay to Swansea North ? Baglan Bay 275kV Substation In respect of existing NGET infrastructure, NGET will require protective provisions to be included within the DCO to ensure that apparatus is adequately protected and to include compliance with relevant safety standards. Discussions are ongoing between the parties. Further Comments National Grid Electricity Transmission Plc wish to make a relevant representation to the proposed Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay Order in order to protect their position in light of infrastructure, interests and any other equipment not already identified which is within or in close proximity to the proposed DCO boundary. National Grid’s rights to retain its apparatus in situ and rights of access to inspect, maintain, renew and repair such apparatus located within or in close proximity to the order limits including should be maintained at all times and access to inspect such apparatus must not be restricted. As a responsible statutory undertaker, National Grid’s primary concern is to meet its statutory obligations and ensure that any development does not impact in any adverse way upon those statutory obligations. National Grid reserves the right to make further representations as part of the examination process but in the meantime will continue negotiations with the promoter with a view to reaching a satisfactory agreement. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Nicole Pozas Esteban
"The Swansea sewage outfall is located within the proposed Swansea tidal lagoon perimeter. I am aware that there has been some debate concerning extension of the existing (treated) sewage outfall position to the outside of the tidal lagoon. I am unclear as to whether the current proposal includes the commitment to extend the sewage outfall as part of the tidal lagoon development. The lagoon will naturally cause a reduction in seawater exchange from within the basin and I wonder if the effects of this limited seawater (and resulting plankton blooms, altered algal growth) have been fully examined by the Councils and NRW? Added to this, the high nutrient loads from the sewage outfall within the lagoon will further affect the water quality of the tidal lagoon. Has this been investigated? The tidal lagoon is currently marketed as a watersports area (sailing, kayaking, swimming) area. Swansea City Council has done a lot of work in recent years to ensure that Swansea beach and coastal waters fall within bathing waters standards. This has opened up Swansea Bay to opportunities for tourism and leisure, with increasing use of the watersports centre. I am concerned that the discharge of nutrient-rich waters from the tidal lagoon will have negative effects on the water quality of the bay. I would like to ensure that the question of whether or not to extend the sewage outfall is properly evaluated with consideration for the bathing water quality standards. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Oystermouth Primary School
"Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon Oystermouth Primary School is a small school of approx 220 pupils, serving the community of Mumbles, a seaside village on the Western edge of Swansea Bay. It is a traditional Victorian school with limited access to outdoor facilities , which has a long association with the sea and sea-faring families, and sees great value in its links with Mumbles RNLI, Mumbles yacht club, Mumbles sea rowing club and many other user groups within the local area. Our school seeks to foster pupils interest and enthusiasm for their local environment, encouraging them to understand the role they can play in the Swansea Bay community now and in the future and embarking on a process of life-long learning opportunities across all curriculum areas. The Welsh Assembly Government schools curriculum requires pupils to have educational experiences which promote Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship. We seek to provide all pupils appropriate opportunities for the development of these experiences and the skills that enable the pupils to develop their understanding of diversity, citizenship and stewardship, interdependence and knowledge of the world in which they live. As a school we need to provide our pupils with opportunities to develop and extend their awareness of education for sustainable development and global citizenship and this requires excellent resources and staff confidence to deliver these requirements. The teaching resources being developed to run along side the Tidal Lagoon facility will be of invaluable use for teachers delivering the curriculum. The school strives to nurture positive attitudes towards the environment and sustainable living and our ethos mirrors that of sustainable development and global citizenship, trying to promote this through positive actions in and around our school and community. We feel that The Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon Project would greatly enhance pupils opportunities for learning in this area and provide powerful, real life teaching resources which would clearly demonstrate our need to use the natural resources around them for renewable, sustainable energy in the future. A clear demonstration of the power this project can bring to the learning of our pupils was witnessed in a recent Geography/Literacy lesson. The teacher showed the Year 4 class the promotional video for the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon as a stimulus for questions to ask the visiting officer of the organisation. At the end of the viewing the whole class broke into spontaneous applause in support of the project, a scene not witnessed before in twenty years of teaching experience by the class teacher. This clearly demonstrates the level of positive impact this resource had on young minds. Our school feels that The Tidal Lagoon at Swansea Bay would provide much needed quality leisure and sporting facilities in the Bay area which will provide families with access to opportunities for learning and developing a life-long love of physical activity and healthy lifestyles. If a computer enhanced film of a proposed infrastructural development can invoke such a response in young minds, how much more will the real life experience provide for the children of our city and country in the future?"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Penny Roberts
"The lagoon has the potential to regenerate the decaying eastern side of the city and would compliment current redevelopment Potential to be a tourist attraction Provider of green energy"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Pontardawe and Swansea Angling Society Ltd
"We are a club with 300 members. We own, control or enjoy fishing rights on about 8 miles of the River Tawe. Our fishing is available to the public at modest cost and provides an important recreational amenity. The Tawe supports salmon and sea trout, migratory fish which spend the early part of their life in freshwater, before migrating to sea. Adults later return to spawn in the rivers of their birth as highly prized, valuable fish. Young fish leaving the river (smolts), adults returning to spawn and adults leaving again after spawning (kelts) have to migrate through Swansea Bay, past the proposed lagoon and its turbine array. We are concerned that the proposed lagoon will harm these migratory fish, detrimentally affecting our fishery and its value. This is likely to arise as a result of: 1. massive, unnatural flows in Swansea Bay interfering with normal migration routes and behaviour; 2. fish (smolts, returning adults and kelts) being drawn into the turbines and killed; 3. fish being drawn through the turbines into the impoundment and trapped; 4. fish being driven away from the area by unfavourable conditions; 5. other miscellaneous effects. An independent expert fisheries analysis commissioned by us and others supports our view that the developer’s environmental impact assessment is flawed and understates the likely harm to salmon and sea trout: a. their turbine encounter modelling uses incorrect assumptions for fish movements in Swansea Bay, over-optimistic assumptions for the proposed acoustic fish deterrent scheme and fails to allow for important factors such as river flows and migration delays caused by the nearby Tawe Barrage; b. their turbine mortality modelling uses incorrect fish sizes, fails to estimate population effects (lifetime egg deposition effects) and fails to allow for indirect mortality from post-passage predation, etc; c. they fail to acknowledge the effect on fish from rivers further afield; d. the assessment fails to set out a worst case for the effects on fish. The application mentions a possibility of re-siting the turbine array because of unfavourable sea bed conditions. This would invalidate the modelling and require re-assessment. The Water Framework Directive assessment is flawed because it fails to take account of the likely damaging effect on Tawe waterbodies which are below Good Ecological Status because of fish and must therefore be improved before 2027. The developer has failed to consult us properly (in accordance with its own consultation strategy), denying that we might have grounds to claim compensation for effects on our fishing rights. The consent application has been submitted prematurely, before we were able to discuss our expert fisheries analysis with them. We have had no discussions about monitoring, mitigation or compensation arrangements, as required. Responses to our representations (in our own name and by Fish Legal) have been unsatisfactory. Bizarrely, the consent application includes a proposal, not discussed with us, for our membership of a fisheries reference group to investigate the effects of the Tawe Barrage - apparently (and contrarily) in connection with possible mitigation for effects on fish which are denied. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Richard James
"This is a massive opportunity for Swansea. The potential to produce and teach the next generation about 'green' energy is so important. It has been well planned so far, not rushed and I am truly proud to be from Swansea where these initiatives are thought of."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Ruth Lovell
"I am supportive of this application for a range of reasons: - provision of sport, leisure and recreational facilities - it will contribute to the economy of Swansea Bay and South Wales -and most importantly it will provide carbon savings, contributing to the commitments made by the UK to reduce emissions, and produce a significant percentage of Wales’ domestic energy needs. As the first of potential network of lagoons that could provide up to 10GW of reliable, renewable generating capacity, it is an essential first step in the fulfilment of renewable energy production targets and emissions reduction at the EU level. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
South and West Wales Association of Sea Anglers (SWWASAC) (South and West Wales Association of Sea Anglers (SWWASAC))
"I am making a representation on behalf of the South and West Wales Association of Sea Angling Clubs (SWWASAC). Association History; The Association was formed in 1981 as a result of a need for an organization to establish a bond of friendship and representing clubs and individual anglers in the Swansea area and to look after their fishing interests and to make representations to Authorities whenever Sea Angling interests were being affected. We enjoy local and national coverage in the press, in the local Evening Post, through Sea Angling columns and even to sound radio. Boat anglers from Penarth in the East to Aberystwyth in the West can thank the Association for the licensing system that the district councils now have for charter angling boats. In those early days few boats were properly equipped until the matter was taken up, except those operating under load line exemption. Our Angling Correspondent attends regular meetings with the Welsh Assembly Governments' as a representative on the Governments Fisheries for South Wales on marine matters such as Grandfather rights on large trawlers, minimum fish sizes etc. We have been active in the field of marine conservation and have had close co-operation with the Marine Conservation Society and Swansea University in their research programmes connected with sea fish. Consultations; Authorities have consulted us on Sea Angling matters. We were consulted by Defra (previously called Maff) on Bass nursery areas at a meeting in London. By WAG and the Crown Estates on Sand and Aggregate dredging and its effect on marine life. Recently we were consulted on No Take Zones for marine life conservation. Supporting Tourism; Each year we hold Open Competitions in the South Wales area. This brings in anglers from outside the area such as Bristol, Devon and even as far away as the Isle of Wight. We have been holding angling competitions on the Breakwater wall in Swansea docks with permission from the Port Authority for a number of years and would like this to continue on the Lagoon. The Breakwater wall will be enclosed within the Lagoon to the east side which will restrict our activity we believe, due to new activities being proposed for the Lagoon. We would ideally like to fish on the outer wall of the Lagoon but the fishing platforms will be on the inside wall. Also, during Open Competitions we can expect about 30 - 100 anglers so platform size could be an issue. Supporting Local Business and Communities There are a number of Angling shops in Swansea that benefit from our activities. We also take part in Beach cleaning events, litter surveys by the Marine Conservation Society and litter cleaning on the West Pier, and the Breakwater of Swansea Docks. Also we hold coaching events for juniors on the West Pier and sometimes on Swansea Bay and other places. Recently we have set up Angling Bins with the Marine Conservation Society at various popular angling locations. So as you see we support the local community in our own way. Making the Lagoon more accessible to anglers would be welcome. Conclusion; We believe that the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Project will benefit Sea angling by attracting anglers from a wider area and this in turn will benefit local business. The local community will also benefit by making sea angling safer within the protection of the Lagoon."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Agent for St Modwen Developments Limited (124792.000051) on behalf of St Modwen Developments Limited
"1. Environmental aspects (i) The lagoon The shelter from the wave environment provided by TLSB will prevent sediment transport which could result in a muddy foreshore. Geotubes used in the construction process will be filled with potentially contaminated materials obtained through the dredging process. The geofabric is at risk of leaking such materials and no testing of such materials in a marine environment has been undertaken to assess this risk. Tidal flushing of the environment following major sewage outfall into the lagoon during severe storms may be prevented by the TLSB. (ii) The local environment Insufficient assessment has been made of the effect upon the nearby SSSI at Crymlyn Burrows or the dunes at Baglan Bay. There have been no proposals for a long term, post-construction programme for monitoring the local ecology or mitigating any ecological risks. (iii) The wider environment Changes caused to wave and tidal driven sediment and navigation channels in Swansea Bay should be assessed in greater detail. Having a contained area of over 13 Km2 and a height of 8m at mean tide, TLSB will have significant negative visual effects and consequences for Swansea Bay, particularly the University’s new campus. 2. Construction/Operational Aspects (i) Construction and Operations TLSB has failed to adequately assess the impact of noise, dust, traffic and nuisance that will be caused to the University’s new campus. This is also true of several operational issues. The proposed rock armour is significantly less than that involved at Neath/Port Talbot. The data on which this armour is based has not been disseminated. (iii) Decommissioning Inadequate detail has been provided in relation to the decommissioning process of both the plant and the wall at the end of the proposed 125 year long lease, including its funding. The lack of detail causes great concern due to the serious negative impact upon the environment and aesthetics of the area. If left, TLSB could fall into disrepair and responsibility for its upkeep is unspecified. Further suggestions have been made in respect of continued use as an offshore generating station beyond the term of the initial lease. It is not possible to assess the scope of this proposal based on the terms of the current Application. 3. Costs, Financial Model and Funding Structure Insufficient detail has been provided to assess the viability of the financial model. TLSB has indicated the high level of uncertainty in this aspect and the reliance upon a wide range of uncertain variables for example Contract for Difference strike prices. The funding structure, including cash flow during development, has not been clarified. As such, the commercial viability of the project is unquantifiable. 4. Compulsory Acquisition The compulsory acquisition of the interested party’s interests specified in the Book of Reference is unnecessary and provides powers to the Applicant which go beyond those which are required to facilitate the proposed development. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Agent for St Modwen Properties Plc (0124792.000051) on behalf of St Modwen Properties Plc
"1. Environmental aspects (i) The lagoon The shelter from the wave environment provided by TLSB will prevent sediment transport which could result in a muddy foreshore. Geotubes used in the construction process will be filled with potentially contaminated materials obtained through the dredging process. The geofabric is at risk of leaking such materials and no testing of such materials in a marine environment has been undertaken to assess this risk. Tidal flushing of the environment following major sewage outfall into the lagoon during severe storms may be prevented by the TLSB. (ii) The local environment Insufficient assessment has been made of the effect upon the nearby SSSI at Crymlyn Burrows or the dunes at Baglan Bay. There have been no proposals for a long term, post-construction programme for monitoring the local ecology or mitigating any ecological risks. (iii) The wider environment Changes caused to wave and tidal driven sediment and navigation channels in Swansea Bay should be assessed in greater detail. Having a contained area of over 13 Km2 and a height of 8m at mean tide, TLSB will have significant negative visual effects and consequences for Swansea Bay, particularly the University’s new campus. 2. Construction/Operational Aspects (i) Construction and Operations TLSB has failed to adequately assess the impact of noise, dust, traffic and nuisance that will be caused to the University’s new campus. This is also true of several operational issues. The proposed rock armour is significantly less than that involved at Neath/Port Talbot. The data on which this armour is based has not been disseminated. (iii) Decommissioning Inadequate detail has been provided in relation to the decommissioning process of both the plant and the wall at the end of the proposed 125 year long lease, including its funding. The lack of detail causes great concern due to the serious negative impact upon the environment and aesthetics of the area. If left, TLSB could fall into disrepair and responsibility for its upkeep is unspecified. Further suggestions have been made in respect of continued use as an offshore generating station beyond the term of the initial lease. It is not possible to assess the scope of this proposal based on the terms of the current Application. 3. Costs, Financial Model and Funding Structure Insufficient detail has been provided to assess the viability of the financial model. TLSB has indicated the high level of uncertainty in this aspect and the reliance upon a wide range of uncertain variables for example Contract for Difference strike prices. The funding structure, including cash flow during development, has not been clarified. As such, the commercial viability of the project is unquantifiable. 4. Compulsory Acquisition The compulsory acquisition of the interested party’s interests specified in the Book of Reference is unnecessary and provides powers to the Applicant which go beyond those which are required to facilitate the proposed development. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Agent for St Modwen Properties VIII Sarl (124792.000051) on behalf of St Modwen Properties VIII Sarl
"1. Environmental aspects (i) The lagoon The shelter from the wave environment provided by TLSB will prevent sediment transport which could result in a muddy foreshore. Geotubes used in the construction process will be filled with potentially contaminated materials obtained through the dredging process. The geofabric is at risk of leaking such materials and no testing of such materials in a marine environment has been undertaken to assess this risk. Tidal flushing of the environment following major sewage outfall into the lagoon during severe storms may be prevented by the TLSB. (ii) The local environment Insufficient assessment has been made of the effect upon the nearby SSSI at Crymlyn Burrows or the dunes at Baglan Bay. There have been no proposals for a long term, post-construction programme for monitoring the local ecology or mitigating any ecological risks. (iii) The wider environment Changes caused to wave and tidal driven sediment and navigation channels in Swansea Bay should be assessed in greater detail. Having a contained area of over 13 Km2 and a height of 8m at mean tide, TLSB will have significant negative visual effects and consequences for Swansea Bay, particularly the University’s new campus. 2. Construction/Operational Aspects (i) Construction and Operations TLSB has failed to adequately assess the impact of noise, dust, traffic and nuisance that will be caused to the University’s new campus. This is also true of several operational issues. The proposed rock armour is significantly less than that involved at Neath/Port Talbot. The data on which this armour is based has not been disseminated. (iii) Decommissioning Inadequate detail has been provided in relation to the decommissioning process of both the plant and the wall at the end of the proposed 125 year long lease, including its funding. The lack of detail causes great concern due to the serious negative impact upon the environment and aesthetics of the area. If left, TLSB could fall into disrepair and responsibility for its upkeep is unspecified. Further suggestions have been made in respect of continued use as an offshore generating station beyond the term of the initial lease. It is not possible to assess the scope of this proposal based on the terms of the current Application. 3. Costs, Financial Model and Funding Structure Insufficient detail has been provided to assess the viability of the financial model. TLSB has indicated the high level of uncertainty in this aspect and the reliance upon a wide range of uncertain variables for example Contract for Difference strike prices. The funding structure, including cash flow during development, has not been clarified. As such, the commercial viability of the project is unquantifiable. 4. Compulsory Acquisition The compulsory acquisition of the interested party’s interests specified in the Book of Reference is unnecessary and provides powers to the Applicant which go beyond those which are required to facilitate the proposed development. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Tawe Boat Club on behalf of Tawe Boating Club
"From the Club's point of view we are very supportive of the project and would like to see it go ahead as being in such close proximity it would have obvious benefits. Also we have been in close consultation with tidal lagoon power and they have been very helpful in assisting us especially with translating any legal jargon that has been received and explaining the intent of the submitted plans. We know that the area that we lease will be earmarked for possible access for work and we are very happy to allow any access as as long as it doesn't detract from our income to keep the club running as we are a small well established non profit organisation. In addition we are also happy if needed to help with any 'local knowledge' issues if required as many of the members now are past retirement age and some have surprisingly good memories 🙂 and if some permanent access is required via the club premises after the project is completed we are also open to negotiations to help with this. "
Sefydliadau Anstatudol
The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales
"The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales are pleased to see the additional modelling that has been carried out to inform the Environmental Statement, particularly in relation to suspended sediment concentration/dispersal and water quality, much of which resolves concerns set out in our response to the Preliminary Environmental Information Report. Our main concern is the loss of intertidal habitat, particularly if fixed speed turbines are used. As well as direct habitat loss, the major adverse impact on protected species/features, including Sabellaria reefs, hydroid rockpools, intertidal mudflats and sandflats, is of particular concern. Whilst we welcome the intention to mitigate these impacts, we do not believe that these measures will necessarily reduce the impact as strongly as suggested. Translocation of Sabellaria is unproven and therefore we would not rely on this as being successful mitigation for its loss. The installation of bioblocks/rockpools in the sea wall may be suitable replacement for some habitat loss; however this should not be seen as enhancement. Whilst this artificial habitat may increase biodiversity, it will not mitigate the predicted loss of the mud or sand habitats, for which no other mitigation is suggested. Introduction of native oyster is also described as enhancement, however we believe that it would be premature to consider this, until the lagoon has been established and the full impacts on the ecosystem have been realised. We also have concerns as to the impact of cabling routes through the Crymlyn Burrows SSSI, as both options described have moderate adverse impacts on the site. We note that option 1 is the less damaging of the options, however would still require robust mitigation measures. However, we are pleased to note that the ES predicts no net loss of sand dune habitat at the SSSI, although it is expected to change in shape. We would therefore expect these habitat changes to be monitored through the lifetime of the project, to validate these predictions. As this project is the first of its kind in the UK, we hope that robust monitoring programmes will be implemented through both construction and operation. We welcome the commitment to monitoring of the sea wall both for biodiversity and detection of invasive species. We would hope that this would be reactive management, so that if invasive species are detected, processes will be in place to control them. We also welcome the commitment to monitoring the changes in habitat extent, due to the low confidence of the CIA. We are cautious about the indication that acoustic fish deterrents may be used and the wider impacts these may have, for example on marine mammals. We note the commitment to an adaptive monitoring and mitigation strategy for marine mammals, particularly due to the potential cumulative impact of collision risk. We will be interested to see the detail of this as it develops. We would encourage Tidal Lagoon Power to promote the natural environment and its conservation as part of its visitor experience at the site. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
TLSB Active Supporters Group, Gower, Wales & UK
"My name is Alan Glass, and as Chairman of the Active Supporters Group (ASG) for Gower, Wales and UK, I am making a representation in favour of the proposed Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay project on behalf of this group. There are three supporters groups clustered around Swansea Bay. My group is for those without a direct view of the proposed tidal power station. Some, like myself, live nearby within the City and County of Swansea, and so view this as a local scheme that we will drive past frequently when it is built. Others are elsewhere in Wales, and still others live throughout the UK and are just keen to do a little to support such an innovative and exciting scheme: a world first, and something that will hopefully be quickly replicated in other parts of the UK and around the world where the right tidal conditions permit. We are experiencing climate change through global warming. How much this is due to fossil fuel emission will long be debated by scientists. However, rightly, most countries are signed up to reduce CO2 emissions, and as a result the UK government is decommissioning coal, oil and gas burning power stations, but as new power stations are not being built at the same rate, we face a power deficit shortly. There is talk of power rationing to industry, which is an appalling prospect as we must support whatever manufacturing capacity will still have, or it will disappear abroad. Wind and solar PV technology offer potential, but they are visually contentious, without grant aid their viability is questionable, and they are not guaranteed to produce power when it is required. We have the second highest tidal range in the world on our doorstep, and the timing and depth of tides can be predicted thousands of years ahead, so it is predictable and reliable. I have had the opportunity to visit La Rance, the world’s first tidal power station (partially damming a river), opened in 1966. Without subsidy, it has long ago been paid for, and it produces power at a very low cost, as well as forming a road-bridge. Some of the original turbines have had a major overhaul, and the others are yet to be done, after nearly 50 years. Local ecology is largely unaffected, and the subtle changes are mainly regarded as positive. Some of this is not relevant to TLSB, but I can foresee nothing but spin-off benefits arising from this proposed scheme, including improved shore protection from wave damage in winters like we have just experienced, multiple leisure opportunities, a boost to local jobs and tourism, mariculture; synergy with the new science park for Swansea University, and possibly reduced electricity bills locally. Many harbours have break-walls, so this construction will not look out of context, and it will not be highly visible as it will barely project above a high spring tide. In part, it should assist vessels using Swansea Docks by defining the dredged channel. In spite of being so low-key, and offering so many spin-off benefits, this will be primarily a power-station using totally sustainable natural power. Because the members of my active supporters group do not look directly onto Swansea Bay, it is fair to say that “Nimbyism” does not govern our thinking. Some of us are close enough geographically to welcome the benefits it will bring to the local economy. It is fair to say that we are all united in a belief that this is a project that is as close to ideal as possible in harnessing the powers of nature in a fully sustainable manner, as well as helping the UK government to meet CO2 emission targets. For the sake of UK climate obligations, this exciting project must be brought to fruition quickly. In the past, Wales could be regarded as a “dumping ground” for dirty industry that others did not want, but I sense that this innovative technology will be widely welcomed locally, as being unobtrusive and helping put Wales in the vanguard of new technology. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Welsh Association of Sub Aqua Clubs
"We are making this representation on behalf of the Welsh Association of Sub-Aqua Clubs (WASAC) in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. WASAC is the National Governing Body for the sport of sub-aqua in Wales and represent the views of affiliate member clubs based in the principality. WASAC seek to disseminate information concerning safety, site access, legal obligations and duty of care of diving groups and act as a forum for issues that affect diving clubs in Wales so they may be brought to the appropriate bodies and heard. WASAC is committed to promoting, protecting and representing the interests of all divers and snorkellers in Wales. We work in conjunction with regional organisations such as Pembrokeshire Coastal Forum, Natural Resources Wales, the Welsh Sports Association and diver training agencies to ensure the continued development, safety and enjoyment of scuba diving for all. We also work in partnership with a wide range of conservation and environmental organisations to help safeguard the Welsh waters and marine life for divers - both now and for future generations - to enjoy. The proposed facilities that may be provided would be beneficial not just to diving groups but also to other water sports organisations and through shared resources would make the recreational experience for many sportsmen and women both effective and efficient at a single location."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Afan Valley Angling Club on behalf of Afan Valley Angling Club
"The Afan Valley Angling Club owns the fishing rights and river bed of the River Afan from its source to the sea, a distance of approximately 17 miles. The Club has around 250 Members who are required to pay a modest sum by way of annual subscription. Non-members are also able to fish using daily and weekly permits. In addition to indigenous brown trout, the River Afan also supports salmon and seatrout, migratory fish which spend the early part of their life in freshwater, before migrating to sea. Adults later return to spawn in the river of their birth as highly prized, valuable fish. Young fish leaving the river, adults returning to spawn and adults leaving after spawning have to migrate through Swansea Bay, past the proposed lagoon and its turbine array. We are concerned that the proposed lagoon will harm these migratory fish, detrimentally affecting our fishery and its value. This is likely to arise as a result of: a substantial, unnatural flows in Swansea Bay interfering with normal migration routes and behaviour; b fish, during their various migration runs as described above, being drawn into the turbines and killed; c fish being drawn through the turbines into the impoundment and trapped; d fish being driven away from the area by unfavourable conditions; e other miscellaneous effects. An independent expert fisheries analysis commissioned by local angling clubs and others support our view that the developer's environmental impact assessment is flawed and understates the likely harm to salmon and seatrout: a their turbine encounter modelling uses incorrect assumptions for fish movement in Swansea Bay, over-optimistic assumptions for the proposed acoustic fish deterrent scheme and fails to allow for important factors such as river flows; b their turbine mortality modelling uses incorrect fish sizes, fails to estimate population effects (lifetime egg deposition effects) and fails to allow for indirect mortality from post-passage predation etc; c they fail to acknowledge the affect on fish from rivers from further afield; d the assessment fails to set out a worst case for the effects on fish. The application mentions a possibility of re-siting the turbine array because of unfavourable sea bed conditions. This would invalidate the modelling and would require a re-assessment. The Water Framework Directive assessment is flawed because it fails to take account of the likely damaging affect on the River Afan's status which is "failing" due to the lack of fish and, therefore, must be improved before 2027. The developer has failed to consult us properly (in accordance with its own consultation strategy). We have had no discussion about monitoring, mitigation or compensation arrangements, as required."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Ashley Jones
"My name is Ashley Jones and I am the fifth generation to have worked in my family business, Selwyn’s Seafoods in Penclawdd, which has been trading for over 100 years. Our primary products are cockles, mussels, Laverbread and more recently a new and exciting Crispy Seaweed Snack. We at Selwyns are extremely excited at the prospect of Swansea Bay having its own tidal lagoon. We are currently in the process of setting up a brand new, bespoke, seaweed drying, roasting and packaging facility, in an existing unit on our factory premises in Swansea. The factory will produce a light and healthy crispy seaweed snack and Nori sheets for Sushi. At first we will have to import the seaweed sheets from Asia, but are currently working and researching with marine biologists in the hope of setting up a seaweed farm in Swansea, which will produce the high quality seaweed required for Nori sheets. A hatchery and laboratory facility will be integrated into the western landfall building of the tidal lagoon and will include a seawater supply pipe from the lagoon into the facility. This will provide further research into the growth of Nori and could possibly mean that Swansea will be the first in Europe to farm this type of seaweed. The cockle beds on the North side of the Gower, known as the Burry estuaries have experienced difficulties, with high mortalities of cockles over the last decade. This has put the traditional cockle industry, businesses and fishermen at risk. The lagoon could give our industry a revival through a safe aqua cultural/Mari cultural environment. The development of a tidal lagoon in Swansea would support sustainable stocks for our industry in a controlled environment. With protection from weather and pollution a nursery and hatchery for all the products we supply would ensure a thriving ecosystem for them to develop. As a result, this project could revive the current struggling Seafood industry. The natural rock of the lagoon seawall itself will be designed to include rockpools, overhangs and crevices which will provide a diverse range of habitats for different marine species, producing a wealth of cockles, winkles, mussels and various seaweeds. Not forgetting the famous Swansea Oyster, with the development of spatting ponds which will be placed in the intertidal zone, to encourage their return to the Bay. In turn, this thriving ecosystem will also provide a healthy stock of food for the local wildlife. The project will in turn, support local businesses, safe guarding and eventually create thousands of new jobs in the area. In fact, the operational phase of the Project after 2018 could further support an estimated £5m in extra output for Wales, and £2.2m in GVA annually for the region, supporting around 60 full-time equivalent jobs per annum and some £1.5 to £2.1 million of gross value added. This is a greatly needed local investment. The water within the lagoon provides the head - or build-up of water needed to store kinetic energy that can be turned into electric power. It will produce some 400 GWh net of electricity on an annual basis, which is enough to power around 121,000 homes. This will provide our locality with a safe and discrete form of energy, without any interference to local people. The Project will also offer additional benefits to the Swansea Bay area and the wider population, promoting educational, sport, recreational art and cultural activities for public use. This exciting new development supports the needs not only of the seafood industry but also many others in Swansea and Wales as a whole. It will have the highest possible impact in terms of local sustainable development, jobs and skills. Yours Sincerely, Ashley Jones "
Ymgyngoreion Statudol Eraill
Geldards LLP on behalf of Associated British Ports
"Associated British Ports (“ABP”) is the statutory undertaker and competent Harbour Authority for the Ports of Swansea and Port Talbot. ABP is the party principally affected by the development of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay Scheme (“the Scheme”) and has concerns about the effects of the Scheme on its operational and commercial interests at the Ports of Swansea and Port Talbot. ABP therefore objects to the Scheme for reasons including but not limited to the following: (a) The proposals to provide access to the electricity generating station for operational and maintenance purposes and public access to the visitor and recreational facilities will conflict with the safe and efficient operation of the Port of Swansea. (b) There is a risk that the construction works required to implement the Scheme will disturb contaminated sediment in the vicinity of both Ports. This could affect ABP’s maintenance dredging regime, especially in the approach channel at Swansea, and could lead to the withdrawal of ABP`s licence to dispose of dredged material at sea. If this should occur, ABP will incur substantial costs in landfilling the contaminated material and would necessitate restrictions on shipping with a consequent loss of trade. (c) The approach channels, locks and breakwaters are critical to the operation of both Ports. The western arm of the tidal lagoon may have adverse effects on these by altering the marine environment, including wave action and increased sedimentation. This will affect the navigation of vessels and increase repair and maintenance costs. (d) ABP’s corporate strategy envisages the long term retention of the Ports of Swansea and Port Talbot as operational commercial ports with further development for port related trade. Port Talbot operates as an import terminal serving the adjacent Tata Steel plant. ABP is concerned that the Scheme will adversely affect its strategy and existing customers. ABP has indicated to the promoter of the Scheme the protective measures it requires either through the development consent order (“DCO”) or through a separate agreement with the promoter in order to address the above concerns, and discussions in respect of those measures are ongoing. The promoter of the Scheme is also seeking authority in the DCO to acquire compulsorily land and interests forming parts of ABP`s statutory undertaking. In view of its willingness to engage with the promoter, ABP objects to the grant of CPO powers and requests that a CPO oral hearing takes place. This representation is also made pursuant to Section 127 of the Planning Act 2008. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Atkins
"Atkins is one of the world’s leading design and engineering consultancies. We have experience of working on infrastructure projects in many different countries across a wide range of sectors, including energy, marine and coastal, urban planning and general civil engineering giving us a substantial and informed insight into schemes such as the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay. Based on our knowledge and experience, we believe tidal lagoon power would represent a bold new addition to the UK’s energy mix and is a great example of how innovative engineering could be used to harness our natural resources and provide clean, sustainable power for thousands of homes and businesses. The UK has made challenging commitments to deliver 15% of its energy demand from renewable sources by 2020. In 2012, it was reported that we were ‘more than 4%*’ towards this target. This leaves 11% to deliver in less than six years. Tidal lagoons have the potential to provide some 10% of the UK’s electricity demand and subject to planning / regulatory processes could be operational in time to help meet this target. This form of energy is green; more predictable and constant than other renewables; and is home grown, protecting against some of the risks of energy imports. In order to realise this objective, which would involve several tidal lagoons, it is vital that the Swansea Bay scheme progresses to prove the concept. It will also help ensure that the cost of the subsidy required for this type of energy generation becomes increasingly competitive against other forms of energy generation, particularly renewables. In addition to these tangible energy / sustainability benefits, tidal lagoons offer excellent export opportunities. Through the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay scheme, UK companies have developed the pioneering technology, processes and application which could be harnessed by other countries around the world which have large tidal ranges. This is good for the reputation of UK engineering; will help secure UK jobs and deliver revenue for UK companies, however, it would be difficult to realise this potential if the UK itself is not prepared to support and embrace tidal lagoons energy generation. For British companies like Atkins, the scheme will help maintain jobs, bring in revenue and further develop and retain skills Furthermore, if the UK government makes a commitment to tidal lagoon energy, it allows companies to invest in important training and development of people. As well as providing immediate employment opportunities, it has longer term benefits in maintaining / enhancing valuable design, engineering and construction skills within the UK. Although many of the benefits for the UK can only be fully realised once several tidal lagoons have been established, this in itself cannot happen without the Swansea Bay scheme going ahead. Given the level of investment required and the pioneering nature of the scheme Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay will pave the way, but in the mean time, will enable the people of Swansea to start benefitting from greener energy, employment opportunities and the wider regeneration the scheme will bring. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Baglan Operations Limited
"Representation by Baglan Operations Ltd to the application by Tidal Lagoon (Swansea Bay) PLC for an Order granting Development Consent for Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay We refer to the notice dated 6 March 2014 setting out the Secretary of State’s decision to accept this application for examination. We make the following representations: 1. The draft Order is deficient in that it does not sufficiently set out the rights sought to be acquired by the applicant. In particular, the Land Plans accompanying the application identify much land which is subject to the key detail ‘New Rights to be Acquired’. The draft Order itself does not however give any explanation for what these new rights are which are to be acquired, and thus any rights could be acquired. This is not in line with usual practice and unfairly prejudices those affected by the application including Baglan Operations Ltd. 2. It is understood that the proposed works will include the installation and operation of cables through land within the ownership of Baglan Operations Ltd. This land is within the curtilage of Baglan Power Station, an existing operational 525MWe gas-fired power station. It will not be physically possible to route this proposed cabling through the land due to the existence of substantial apparatus already in situ. From reviewing the material available there seems to be no alternative route available within the red line boundary of the submitted accompanying plans. As such, the application should be resubmitted or extended with a feasible route set out in the plans. It should be noted that this substantial oversight is symptomatic of the applicant’s lack of pre-application engagement with Baglan Operations. 3. In respect of existing in situ apparatus, Baglan Operations Ltd will require protective provisions to be included within the draft Order to ensure that it is adequately protected and to include compliance with relevant safety standards. It is not apparent from the application however that any consideration has been paid to the fact that the proposal will interfere with the substantial infrastructure associated with gas-fired power stations, and three infrastructure pipelines of the power station. Indeed, the Environmental Statement makes no mention of these considerations; the potential impacts of the scheme in this regard have not been assessed. Baglan Operations Ltd has concerns that the location of the proposed cabling, in close proximity to Baglan Operations Ltd existing infrastructure, will interfere with the operation of pipelines protection (electromagnetic fields (EMFs)). Consequently Baglan Operations Ltd will require minimum distances and other such protections to be put in place. No works should be permitted to be carried out in the vicinity of these pipelines or any other infrastructure relating to the Baglan power station without the consent of, and monitoring by, Baglan Operations Ltd. The degree of protection necessary shall require an expert engineering assessment/study to be undertaken. 4. In reviewing the available information we note that the works set out in Schedule 1 of the draft Development Consent Order mostly comprise works which are in fact ‘associated development’ as per s.115 of the Planning Act 2008, being development which is associated with the development for which consent is required. It is our understanding that these works do not however meet the requirements of s.115(4) of the Act in that although they are to be carried out wholly in Wales, they do not solely involve the carrying out or construction of surface works, boreholes or pipes associated with underground gas storage by a gas transporter in natural porous strata. As such this raises questions in our view as to whether the Planning Inspectorate has the jurisdiction to examine much of the project comprised in the application. In summary, it is apparent that what has been submitted for approval is a flawed and incomplete application, which should only be allowed to proceed to examination following either withdrawal and resubmission, or amendment to address the weaknesses. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Barry Rice
"The Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon Project is hopefully the first of many tidal lagoons around the UK. These tidal lagoons can provide a reliable source of power that is controlled by the UK. Unfortunately at present we rely too much on foreign supply of power which cannot be a good position for the UK economy. The infrastructure for Swansea Bay will provide many local companies with new business and also the entire UK which can only be good thing for British Manufacturing and in particular engineering."
Awdurdodau Lleol
Carmarthenshire County Council
"The administrative boundary of Carmarthen County Council (CCC) is located approximately 12km from the proposed development however the shortest uninterrupted seaward distance the development maintains from the administrative coastline of CCC is 46km. This distance is considerable and the applicant’s environmental statement indicates that the scheme’s environmental impacts will not be significant adjacent to neighbouring coastal waters and upon the Carmarthenshire coastline. Despite this the Council advises that the information relating to the impact of coastal processes, as a result of the development, upon the Burry Inlet Special Area of Conservation (SAC) is carefully considered. Furthermore, consideration should also be given to how the proposed development impacts upon current dredging operations at Burry Port. The decision maker needs to be satisfied that arrangements for the deposition of dredged material at this location do not have any cumulative impacts with the proposed operations relating to the development, both during the construction and operation phases. The Council recognises that the proposal could have significant regional economic benefits as the extract from the developer’s non technical summary suggests: “Swansea Bay business area estimating that the Project will provide on average 1,850 jobs per year during the construction phase. It is predicted that there will be around 72 permanent jobs associated with the operation of the Lagoon and visitor facilities. A procurement strategy is currently being developed focused on maximising local procurement for aspects including training, employment and manufacture, through working with organisations such as the Welsh Government, local authorities, chambers of commerce and local further educational facilities. It is also predicted that the Project can have a catalytic effect in relation to a tidal lagoon industry, although this does not form part of the assessment contained in the ES.” The statement above is encouraging and CCC welcomes any positive impacts from the development and is keen to be informed of any detailed proposals that accord with Planning Policy Wales 6 and Technical Advice Note 23) in relation to employment growth and economic development within the county. CCC acknowledges that National Policy Statements (NPS) are the main policy documents for assessing NSIPs and form the primary basis for decisions by the Planning Inspectorate and subsequently the Secretary of State. Notwithstanding the role NPSs play in the decision making process, Section 104 of the Planning Act 2008 states that the IPC panel or Council must also have regard to any reports, documents, or other matters that “are both important and relevant to (the) decision”. As such the decision maker is reminded that local plan and national policies require consideration. The Council will provide details of the relevant policy considerations at the next stage of the assessment process. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Christopher Jones
"Tidal Lagoon: Representation Find attached representation for the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon, I present the following personal opinion on the tidal lagoon energy project which will bring a number of significant benefits to the locality and they are: Renewable/Energy Generation The main high level advantages of the Tidal Lagoon in regard to low carbon renewable energy generation are plentiful, below there are several key benefits of the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon including the factor of displacing fossil fuel energy generation. • Significant longevity of the project especially in comparison to conventional fossil fuel generation • It will reduce the dependence upon fossil fuels preserving finite fossil fuel reserves • Provide security of supply, key consideration with the ever presence and threat of potential power outages • Tidal energy is a limitless renewable resource • It produces clean electricity, with no production of greenhouse gas or pollution • Highly efficient low carbon generation process achieving significant levels of CO2 reduction • The lagoon installation will assist in the protection of the shoreline and flood prevention • Energy capturing and conversion mechanism has very little visual impact • Assist the Welsh Government attain CO2 reduction and renewable generation targets • In comparison to conventional electricity generation Tidal Lagoon much lower totalised environmental impact Education/Awareness The Tidal Lagoon will be provide an educational resource centre for all age groups on renewable and specifically tidal power generation and will create teaching facility for regional schools and the general public in South Wales and the UK. Socio-Economic Benefits The highly visible Tidal generation system will deliver a multitude of socio-economic benefits consisting of: • Significant stimulus for local tourism sustainable development, job creation and skills • Provide supply chain strategy which aspires to achieve approximately 50% project expenditure in Wales. • Full-time job equivalents per annum through tourism will be leveraged from the 70,000 to 100,000 leisure trips per annum generated when the Project is operational. To conclude the Tidal Lagoon will be a an exemplar renewable energy project within Wales and specifically within the locality of Swansea/NPTCBC bringing benefits across a number of levels spanning green renewable energy generation, security of supply, tourism, educational benefits, job creation and it would be an essential and significant boost to locality and principality that this project proceeds forward. The Tidal Lagoon project is potentially a ‘World Attraction’ which will provide a much needed investment to the region and in my opinion it is imperative that it takes place. "
Awdurdodau Lleol
City and County of Swansea
"This relevant representation is submitted in accordance with Regulation 4 of the Infrastructure Planning (Interested Parties) Regulations 2010. Under the provisions of the 2008 Act (as amended), the City & County of Swansea (CCS) is a “relevant local authority” for the purposes of the examination of the application for a Development Consent Order by Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay Ltd. Accordingly it is not necessary to formally register as an “interested party” as part of the process of making relevant representation. The key issues for CCS with this application are identified in the report of the Head of Economic Regeneration and Planning to the Development Management and Control Committee on the 29th August 2013. The issues correspond largely to the topic areas contained within the Preliminary Environmental Information Report, and are as follows: • Compliance with national and development plan policy; • Seascape, landscape and visual impact; • Design and public realm; • Marine water quality; • Navigation and marine transport; • Coastal processes, sediment transport and contamination; • Intertidal and subtidal benthic ecology • Fish, including recreational and commercial fisheries; • Marine mammals and turtles; • Coastal birds; • Terrestrial ecology; • Air quality; • Hydrology and flood risk; • Land quality and hydrogeology; • Noise and vibration; • Onshore transportation, pedestrian movements and connections; • Cultural heritage: terrestrial and marine archaeology and historic landscape; • Economy, tourism and recreation; and • Sustainability. These topic areas are explored in detail within Committee report. To assist the Examining Authority in understanding the issues as they apply to CCS, a copy of the report and associated minutes can be viewed via the following links: (if these links do not open automatically please copy and paste into your browser) http://www.swansea.gov.uk/media/pdf/9/j/Public_Agenda_Pack_-_Special_Development_Management___Control_Committee_-_29_August_2013.pdf http://www.swansea.gov.uk/media/pdf/o/9/Minutes_-_29_August_2013_(cleared).pdf The issues highlighted above will be further considered as part of the Council’s Local Impact Report and Written Representation in accordance with the timetable set by the Examining Authority’s Rule 8 letter. This relevant representation is made by Richard Jones, Major Projects Team Leader, on behalf of CCS. Contact details are as follows: Economic Regeneration and Planning, Oystermouth Road, Swansea, SA1 3SN. Email: [email protected] Telephone: 01792 635735. Notwithstanding the status of CCS in the examination process, the Council respectfully reserves the right to appear at any associated issue-specific or open-floor hearing. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Costain Ltd
"Costain Representation Costain is one of the UK’s leading engineering solutions providers, we offer our customers a multidisciplinary range of services across the full life cycle of their assets and we actively support the requirement for renewable energy as part of a balanced energy mix for the United Kingdom. We have been appointed by Tidal Lagoon Power to support the development of Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay. This represents a significant opportunity for Wales to take a leading position in the renewable energy industry on behalf of the United Kingdom and we are pleased to be engaged as part of this process. Capable of generating sufficient electricity that is equivalent to Swansea’s entire domestic consumption, the proposed power plant in Swansea Bay will produce predictable, base-load electricity each day, using both the ebb and flood tides. It will save over 230,000Te of CO2 per year for its design life of over 120 years. The project represents an investment in excess of £750 million that has the potential to generate approximately £300 million of regional spending for the area. It will support the creation of significant local employer and employment opportunities both in the construction phase and when fully operational. In addition it will provide an attractive amenity asset that will be available to the local and wider communities. Furthermore, the project will help deliver a balanced energy mix for the future and this is consistent with the EU Energy Roadmap 2050 and target of reducing GHG emissions by at least 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Cynnal Cymru - Sustain Wales on behalf of David Fitzpatrick; Cynnal Cymru - Sustain Wales
"Cynnal Cymru - Sustain Wales is a sustainable development networking organisation working across a broad range of issues including; renewable energy, climate change and the economy to name a few. We are positively interested in this project from a renewable, carbon emission, sustainable and environmental perspective and also sustainability through jobs creation (via construction/tourism/sports). We plan to submit a written representation at a later stage. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
David Lort-Phillips
"As a regional land and farm owner I have undertaken ten years work on oyster rearing in the 80's, trying to restore (either with Crassostrea or Edulis oysters) the traditional oyster beds at Lawrenny and elsewhere in Milford. Evidence of the existence of a massive local resource in mediaeval times is found in gardens and across farmland along the southern Welsh coast, (and referred to in contemporary history). Alas the advent of dredging extensive ship movements and the railway in mid C19th destroyed the fishery. In my work in Milford I was inspired by the work of marine biologist John Bayes and his company at Seasalter Shellfish (http://www.oysterhatchery.com/) All this involved me in the research work of the Shellfish Association of GB and for time I chaired its scientific research committee working with the Welsh director of the SAGB Eric Edwards. This work is in my view highly relevant to any tidal lagoon idea (Swansea in particular as it's to be built not too far from Oystermouth) using as an exemplar the remarkable pioneering work that John did in enriching seawater with plankton and feeding shellfish larvae through upwelling systems. Not only will the artificial reef created by the lagoon enhance natural biodiversity it can also support special maricultural systems. These work crudely but effectively by creating a head of seawater, capturing it at high tide, enriching it slightly with minerals to enhance zoo- and phytoplankton growth and letting it flow gently as the tide falls through seed oysters or other shellfish suspended on fine mesh. Sea water captured within a tidal lagoon (at no great additional capital cost) can create many opportunities for nurseries of fish and shellfish, without in any way compromising the energy generating capability of the tidal lagoon. Further lateral thinking brings one to consider the option of rearing lobsters and other valuable shellfish species on large scale, keeping them within a sheltered environment in simple pipe structures set within the lagoon walls protected from predators. I put out this idea at a technical meeting on renewable energy and climate change some years ago at Portcullis house when tidal lagoons were discussed. I think the idea went slightly over the head of those present who couldn't see the connection between renewable energy and rearing shellfish, but the benefits are extensive. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Dr Ivan Haigh
"As a professional oceanographer at the University of Southampton, who has worked on coastal issues over the past 12 years, I am a strong supporter of the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon. This is a exciting project that will hopefully pave the way for other such projects around the UK. Tidal power is one of the least disruptive and potentially the most reliable of all renewable energy resource and, although not many people realise this, has a long history of use in the UK through tidal mills. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Public Health Wales on behalf of Dr Sara Hayes, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg Health Board
"Having consulted our technical advisors within Public Health Wales as well as PHE CRCE – Wales, the Health Board wishes to make the following comments based on the information contained within the submitted Environmental Statement (dated February 2014): • The vicinity in which the development is to take place has a history of poor air quality hence the establishment of 3 AQMAs within as 6km radius of the site (closest being 2km). Whilst the submitted Environmental Statement addresses air quality considerations and rationale during the construction period (completion planned 2019) and activities regarding the day to day running of the barrage, there is no consideration as to the impact the projected 100,000 visitors per annum will have on local air quality. 45% of the expected road traffic volume is expected to be E to W concentrated on major arterial route/s into Swansea yet there is no assessment (albeit projected) on what impact this additional volume of traffic will have on local air quality. • A a number of developments in the vicinity of the proposed scheme are currently under construction or are planned. The submitted documentation does not appear to assess or consider the cumulative impacts of these developments on local air quality or the effect on baseline air quality levels. • It has been noted that the possible impact of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of the project proposal on human health has not been addressed in the Environmental Statement. In a previous response, the Health Board has requested that possible impacts of EMFs be estimated and for details of how these will be mitigated (if any). • The City and County of Swansea has worked hard to improve the quality of bathing water in the Swansea Bay area. The applicant should satisfy the Local Authority and Health Board that this development will not adversely impact on this work and result in a deterioration of local bathing water quality. If you wish to discuss any of these issues or require any additional explanation please do not hesitate to contact us. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Delyth Jewell on behalf of Elfyn Llwyd MP
"I am making a representation on behalf of Elfyn Llwyd MP in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Fairwood Fabrications Limited
"I am making a representation on behalf of Fairwood Fabrications LTD in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. Fairwood Fabrications was established in1979 in Port Talbot with a proud history of serving the steel industry in South Wales, Fairwoods has developed into a quality provider of fabrication, engineering and pipework services. We have a dedicated and experienced management team supported by a highly skilled workforce, at present we employ in the region of 220 locally based personnel. Fairwoods is still a family run business and maintains the same family values that were instilled in 1979. The company continues to invest in personnel, procedures and equipment to maintain a competitive edge within our sector. We believe that the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal will provide a significant opportunity for businesses in and around the Bay area: A recent report carried out by Cardiff University stated the following, which for a local business is very encouraging not just in the short term but in the long term future of business in Wales. "This means for every £1m spent in the region, an estimated further £0.52m of economic activity is supported. Around half of this, almost £223m, is in the construction sector, with manufacturing and production the next largest portion at £170m. We estimate around £34m of output in financial and professional services would be supported, largely comprising project management, planning and engineering activities." The supplier chain benefits could lead to positive changes for manufacturing in Wales, opportunities for local businesses to diversify and introduce innovation that has been very difficult over the past decade due to the competition from overseas. • Supply chain and construction jobs for South Wales “Many of the component parts for the building of the lagoon could be manufactured or fabricated locally. These could include turbine housings, sluice gates, flood doors, rails, electrical controls, hydraulics, precast concrete components, the visitor centre and ancillary buildings. Anticipated investment for these components is estimated to be in the region of £300m. Early estimates suggest 2,880 construction jobs could be created, covering a range of skill levels”. As detailed in the Environmental Statement the potential benefits to the Swansea and surrounding areas is exciting and another positive for local businesses. The tourist impact alone could drive development, which will support and prosper local business, with the added advantage of the facilities for local residents and secured futures of our youth. “22.4.0.61 Swansea has recently sought to maximise the potential of its other key assets and to increase its leisure visitor profile.Emphasis is to be placed on those developments that meet the needs of Swansea’s growing leisure visitor profile, with scenery/landscape sightseeing, walking and watersports considered to be vital themes to target growth. 22.4.0.62 Ultimately, according to the review of relevant policies and strategies the aspiration is for Swansea to support a year-round visitor economy that is suitably attractive to visitors because of its range of leisure activities and interests; and with a sufficient critical mass to encourage longer durations of stay. This project has introduced a rarely experienced excitement into the community and local businesses, all are looking forward to playing a part in such a prestigious, high visibility project. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Fish Legal
"Fish Legal is a membership association which provides legal advice and representation to its member fishing clubs and riparian owners throughout the UK. On behalf of several member clubs in the Swansea Bay area we have already provided the Planning Inspectorate with two detailed representations about the potentially serious impacts of this scheme on migratory salmon and sea trout, and also commissioned a study by independent fisheries biologists into the scientific issues raised by the Environmental Statement (ES Chapter 9 – Fish). We ask that those existing documents are ‘incorporated by reference’ into this summary, but in outline the main points we make are as follows. 1. The salmon and sea trout runs from several rivers in South Wales (and as far as the Rivers Wye and Severn over the border in England) will be affected by the scheme, but principally the Rivers Tawe and Neath which are adjacent to the proposed tidal lagoon. Salmon and sea trout caught in the recreational fisheries on these rivers have a significant capital (property) value, with just one rod-caught salmon per annum valued at over £7,000. Reductions caused by the tidal lagoon of even quite small numbers of fish that would otherwise have run these rivers will therefore have significant economic implications. 2. The report we commissioned from fisheries consultants APEM Ltd, who have direct experience of modelling marine hydropower impacts on migratory salmonids (eg. for the proposed Severn Barrage), corroborates our own view that the fisheries modelling used in the ES does not, and cannot, remove a number of significant uncertainties in relation to the impacts on migratory salmonids. Essential (including baseline) data are missing, there is no previous comparable experience of this type of project to provide a degree of certainty, and there are inherent methodological concerns with the theoretical models. 3. Given these high levels of uncertainty (it is simply not known what the impacts on migratory salmonids will be, no matter how sophisticated the models may appear), the best that can confidently be said is that there will be some impacts on salmon and sea trout, but hopefully these will not be substantial. Given the value of the resource and the high level of uncertainty, commitment to a precautionary and/or careful adaptive approach is clearly required if the scheme is to be given planning consent. Fundamental to the adaptive approach is very careful and comprehensive monitoring. Long-term, funded monitoring should be committed to in relation to (a) baseline and post-implementation movements of salmon and sea trout smolts, kelts and adults in the inner estuary of the River Tawe (upstream of the barrage) as well as the outer estuaries of the Tawe and Neath; (b) impacts of the lagoon turbine system on those fish; (c) effectiveness of the AFD (and any other mitigation) designs; (d) need for, effectiveness and value of the proposed offset or offsets, in particular the re-design of the Tawe Barrage to improve salmonid migration ; and (e) effects on salmonid stocks from non-adjacent river systems. At the same time there needs to be an assessment of how the tidal lagoon system will be ‘adapted’ (ie. altered) should the comprehensive monitoring outlined above indicate concerns or impacts, and if adaptation is not possible how the impacts will be compensated for. All of the above should be secured through the DCO or other formal commitment/requirement, with appropriate input from the recreational fisheries interests. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
GE Power Conversion UK Ltd
"Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay – GE Representations for Planning Inspectorate ‘’GE Power Conversion Ltd (GE PC) – part of GE Energy Management (GE EM) are making a representation in support of the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay proposal. GE Energy Management (GE EM) is GE's electrification business. We make energy safer and more useful through our ability to transmit, distribute and convert electricity. We integrate leading products and technology to solve customer problems. Our electrical solutions allow utilities and energy-intensive industries such as renewables, oil & gas, and marine, to manage electricity from the point of generation to the point of consumption. GE PC offer a full range of electrical capabilities that includes induction generators, variable speed drive systems and MV/HV power distribution equipment. Combined with hydro-turbines from Andritz Hydro GmbH, we can provide complete water to wire generation for tidal lagoon schemes. Our global teams design industry-leading technology to improve the transmission, distribution and conversion of electricity, and to help provide safe, efficient and reliable electrical power.(See more at http://www.geenergymanagement.com/about us). GE PC has extensive UK manufacturing facilities and existing service & support offices in Swansea. During the execution of this project, it is the intention to provide additional facilities for the final assembly of the generator into the turbine bulb, also in the Swansea area. Job creation; The Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay project will be one of the world’s first tidal lagoon electricity generating power plants and the first in the UK. This would be a prestigious project for the communities in Swansea and Wales leading to the creation of multiple jobs and generating business. Based on our business projections and the conclusions of Chapter 22 of the ES, we estimate that GE PC may create in excess of 50+ jobs considering the construction and operating phases in the Swansea area as a result also of the extra demand created by the proposal. Swansea Bay promoting renewable energy; GE PC believes that this project at Swansea will make a significant contribution to the UK’s commitments on Climate Change targets and provide a renewable energy generation alternative to deliver the UK’s ever-increasing power demand. Increase in technology tourism; It can be easily foreseen that the project shall attract people from all over the world to view the lagoon at Swansea. Central to this will be the water to wire hydro-generation system that GE PC is partnering with Andritz Hydro GmbH to provide. We believe this will attract further orders and interest from around the world for our electricity generation systems. Supply chain; TLSB’s commitment to ensuring a local supply chain is explained in Chapter 22 of the ES. We concur with the evidence in this Chapter and our projections indicate that the Swansea area and community will benefit significantly from the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay project & the supply of GE PC induction generators – providing job creation in fabrication / assembly / logistics / hotels & local services. Conclusions GE Power Conversion Ltd. completely supports the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon project as a global prestigious electricity generating project for the people of Swansea and Wales, and the UK. This is a renewable energy project that GE Power Conversion Ltd would be proud to take a vital part in to represent GE’s global leading technology innovations. This project will initiate extensive job creation in Swansea, contributing to a stronger economy for Swansea’. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Good Energy Group PLC
"Good Energy was founded over a decade ago with a clear objective to make a difference to climate change and supporting the UK to be more energy secure. The company aims to do this by giving individuals a choice for their energy to come from a 100% renewable generation, provide investors with a green investment alternative, and work with government to encourage a supportive regulatory environment for renewables. As a vertically integrated renewable energy company we are a supplier of energy to 55,000 residential and business customers; a generator of renewable energy from wind and solar power and a Feed in tariff administrator looking after over 60,000 small renewable generators. The UK faces unprecedented challenges in meeting climate change targets as well as ensuring that it produces enough electricity to meet the UK energy demand in a safe and secure way. Good Energy believes that renewable energy provides an answer to some of these key questions, in both a timely and an economically effective manner. The Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay application offers a first of a kind opportunity for a tidal lagoon project in the UK which is expected to deliver long term, large scale renewable power. This is a really important step towards a renewable powered UK. Not only does this project have scale, it also provides power that is fundamentally predictable, enabling it to contribute effectively to the supply onto the national grid. Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay, will be a first for the UK, but the potential does not stop there. The technology can be implemented around the coast line of the UK, providing a predictable source of power at different geographical locations. Good Energy wants to highlight that the project is supported under both Welsh and UK policy, and that is also brings unique benefits in terms of the facility it provides to the people of Swansea Bay. In particular Good Energy believes the site will be a visitor attraction both for the people of Swansea, and for visitors to Swansea. Our experience is that where industrial power plants can be opened to visitors they are very popular. Over the years we have had open days at our North Cornish wind farm, with thousands of people completing turbine tours, to understand how wind turbines work and get closer to this technology. Swansea Bay will be better set up with a visitors centre, and access for visitors, and we believe this will attract thousands of people to the site. In addition to the related economic activity that is likely to be seen at the site due to the visitors attending, we also believe that there is the potential to ensure that the local economy can also benefit from the potential industrial activity related to building and operating the site. We believe that this can be significant, and that Swansea could be a centre of learning for industry on future tidal lagoons in the UK and abroad. Good Energy is pleased to offer its full support to this pioneering project and believes it offers a real opportunity to make a vital contribution to re-balancing the country’s energy mix toward renewable energy sources and to supporting security of supply for UK consumers. About Juliet Davenport: OBE and founder of Good Energy. Sat on the UK Government’s Renewable Advisory Board for 3 years, and now sits on the board of Energy UK, the trade association for the UK energy market, and on the regulators, OFGEM Social and Environmental Advisory Board. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Gower Power Community Co-operative
"Having studied TLSB proposal and also attended numerous of their events, I have concluded that the project is exemplary. It would play a very important role in meeting the climate change agenda and also in developing the Swansea Bay area. As a fellow renewable energy developer in Swansea, it also gives us great reassurance to be working alongside an organisation that not only understand the importance of creating an integrated development (i.e. not just a power plant) but one that aspires to set new benchmarks in supply chain management. We look forward to the day that Swansea is looked at as the leading city for Sustainability in the UK. We can see great advantages of having a benchmark tidal project installed alongside our benchmark regeneration agriculture/solar projects in Swansea and hope that the planning inspectorate is can confidently give the planning permission that they need to take this forward. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Guts Surfboards
"I am making this supportive statement as the current Welsh Stand Up Paddle Board (SUP) champion for 2014, previous 2 times British SUP champion, 15 times Welsh surfing Champion, 9 times British Surfing Champion, 2 times European Pro-champion and top 5 ranked in the world professional surfer. I am supportive of the Tidal Lagoon being constructed in Swansea not only because it takes advantage of a natural resource to produce clean electricity but because of all the water related benefits it will bring. I would definatley be interested in using the lagoon to teach and coach SUP and have no doubt that many of my customers will use or be interested in using the water sports facilities proposed. I'm certain that by the time the lagoon is constructed the SUP sport will be on the short list for being identified as an Olympic Sport and it would be great for Wales to lead the competition in this area. Swansea and the Gower is a renowned surfing destination in the UK drawing thousands of visitors each year. There is a drawback to this in that good surf conditions are intermittent. I would urge Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay to look into the creation of an artificial surf reef off the southern wall to catch the Swansea Bay swell and if successful believe it would draw many extra surf visitors to Swansea. This could also be a great location for surf competitions too. The nature of the lagoon would mean that there would be no surf inside but the placement of one of the latest artificial wave generating technologies would compliment the lagoon ethos and enhance the water sports facilities on offer. I would suggest looking at the construction of a wave garden or the kswave both of which I presume could use the water in the lagoon. These two technologies create the most natural wave possible and would attract surfers from all over the country and potentially world, with possibilities for competitions also. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Industry Wales
"Industry Wales believes that the proposed Tidal Lagoon Power project for Swansea Bay should proceed, subject to satisfaction of all regulatory and other matters which are understood to be currently in hand. The project has the potential not only to generate green energy, but also to create a completely new industry for Wales, with follow on projects in the UK plus export potential. The project would generate employment, create demand for new skills and new work for existing Welsh companies, plus other economic benefits for Wales. The energy available from the Severn Estuary is there to be harnessed, the UK is short of energy and current provision is expensive and reliant largely on fossil fuels. The proposed project is complex and new, the engineering and other challenges are there to be overcome and this work is already well progressed. Delivering such a project is not an easy or simple task, but this exactly the type of innovation that Wales needs to be good at to succeed on the global stage. Industry Wales is the private sector led, government funded company, that exists to support the growth of Welsh Technology and Manufacturing Businesses Globally. Industry Wales owns and manages Aerospace Wales, The Welsh Automotive Forum and the ESTnet (Electronics, Software and Technology Network) and works with the Welsh Government on its economic growth programmes. For details of Industry Wales see: www.industrywales.com "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Jessica Seaton
"   and Jessica Seaton - Personal Submission We are making this representation on behalf of ourselves.   and I are Directors and Co-Founders of Toast, a fashion and lifestyle company based in Swansea since 1999. We strongly support any project which will make significant inroads into our carbon emissions, for the future of Wales and the world as a whole. Wales has been at the forefront of environmental progress: the highest recycling levels in the UK, plastic bag initiative, imaginative solutions to the issue of flood management and increased statutory controls on levels of insulation and alternative technologies in new housebuilding to name a few. In having this barrage built in the Swansea area, once again, Wales will be leading the whole country in a radical, adaptable, environmentally sensitive solution to the vexed issue of how to produce significant amounts of carbon-free power at a manageable cost. Furthermore, the investment the barrage requires will bring significant economic benefits to the area as a whole. We support the building of the barrage. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Jonathan Owen
"I am submitting this to show my support for the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay project. I am a resident of Llandarcy and really want this project to be accepted for a number of reasons. Many of my family and friends have been employed over the years by BP Landarcy and the British Steel (now TATA). Over the years many of the jobs that were supported by these 2 companies have reduced massively. The works in Llandarcy has now closed with the loss of many jobs. Tata steel has dramatically reduced the workforce in Port Talbot and has made mass redundancies, the last of which was just before Christmas. A project like this is greatly needed to provide jobs to the local community. It would be something that the community could really get behind as it offers not only jobs, but recreation, leisure and the opportunity to attract visitors to the local area again. Another factor would be regarding the local economy. My wife had a café based in SA1 (Swansea). Due to the economic downturn and other factors that we have all encountered over the last 5 years, the café became unviable and as a result the business was lost. We were not the only ones in this circumstance. Small businesses in and around the SA1 and Swansea City centre are really struggling. A project like this would naturally give a massive boost to the local economy. Firstly during the construction phase, there would be increased spending in the local area resulting from an increased labor force in the locality. This would benefit the local retail, food and service industry, bed and breakfasts, hotels etc. Secondly, sustained economic benefits from the increase in tourism. I believe a world’s first Tidal Lagoon for power will generate massive interest for tourism and as such can only benefit the local economy. Lastly I am really passionate about the renewable and sustainable energy that will be produced from the Lagoon. I have been involved in the renewable industry for the last 8 years. Firstly within Solar energy. I was surveying and installing solar panels for both domestic and commercial use. I am now a director of a local based company that specialises in the installation of Energy efficient measures and most recently in the installation of Biomass boilers. I believe that a project that can produce power on a scale like Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay, whilst also being a renewable source, has to be the way forward for power generation in the UK. If we are going to achieve targets that the UK Government has committed to with regards to Carbon, then we have to embrace projects like this. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Julie James Assembly Member for Swansea West
"I welcome the Tidal Lagoon project and its potential positive impact on tourism and the economy in the region with it's iconic visitors centre. I am keen that the environmental impact is managed effectively and has minimal impact on Swansea Bay."
Ymgyngoreion Statudol Eraill
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
"Written representation will be provided in accordance with the exam timetable once published."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mark Hughes
"I believe the the turbines will have detrimental effect on diadromous and other fish populations. Experience has shown that the injury rates are much higher than expected e.g. Annapolis Royal and review of literature shows greater injury and mortality rates than claimed by the modelling. Also deterrent methods would be ineffective. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mond Angling Society
"We are a fishing society with just over 100 members, we have fishing rights for a 11/4 mile stretch of the River Tawe, and provides an important recreational amenity.The river Tawe supports salmon and sea trout,migratory fish whichspend the early part of their life in freashwater, before migrating to sea. the adults later returning to the river of their birth as prized and valuable fish. Young fish leaving the river(smolts), adults returning to spawn and adults leavingagain after spawning (kelts)have to migrate through Swanse Bay, past the proposed lagoon and turbine array. we are concerned that the proposed lagoon will harm these migratory fish,affecting our fishery.this is likely to arise as a result of * massive, unnatural flows in Swansea Bayinterfering with the normal migration routes. *fish being drawn into the turbines and killed. *Fish being drawn through the turbinesinto theimpoundment and trapped. *fish being driven away from the area by unfavourable conditions. *other miscellaneous effects. An independent expert fisheries analysis commissioned by local clubs and others supportsour veiwthat the developer's environmental impact assessment is flawed and understates thethe likely harm to salmon and sea trout. *their turbine encounter modelling usesincrrect assumptions for fish movements in swansea bay, over-optimistic assumptionsfor the proposed acoustic fish deterrent scheme and fails toallow for important factors such as river flow. * their turbine mortality modellinguses incorrect fish sizes,fails to estimate population effects (lifetime egg desposition effects)and fails to allow for indirect mortality from post-passage predation, etc. * they fail to acknowledge the effect on fish from rivers further afield. *the assessment fails toset out a worst case for the effectson fish. the application mentions a possility ofre-siting the turbine array because of unfavourablesea bed conditions. This would invalidate the modalling and require re-assessment. The Water Framement Directive assessmentis flawed because it fails to take account of the likely damaging effect on Tawe waterbodies which are below Good Ecological Status because of fish and must thereforebe improved before 2027. The developer has failed to consult us properly (in accordance with it's own consultation strategy). We have had no discussions about monitering, mitigation or compensation arrangements,as required."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Mrs Janet E Probert
"1 will greatly damage to the beauty of Swansea in bay for all time.2 underwater turbines could be placed in the bay with out building this monstrous seawall which will show most of the time.3 the huge cost of the building of this monster will be out of proportion with the amount of energy it will give back to the population.4 let us inhance the bay with its natural beauty for our important tourist trade this is very important for our economy.5 Swansea Bay is famous throughout the world let's keep it that way."
Ymgyngoreion Statudol Eraill
Natural Resources Wales
"The Natural Resources Body for Wales has submitted a relevant representation on the DCO application, an outline of which is provided below. As previously discussed the extensive nature of our interests mean that to ensure an appropriate level of detail is provided to you at this stage in the process our relevant representation has been submitted under separate cover (letter of 11 April 2014). Our relevant representation includes comments on the following subjects: - Water Framework Directive - Habitats Regulations Assessment - Flood Consequence Assessment - Terrestrial Ecology - Coastal Processes - Marine Water Quality - Intertidal & Sub-tidal Benthic Ecology - Fish - Marine Mammals - Coastal Birds - Seascape, Landscape & Visual Impact Assessment - Air Quality - Land Quality & Hydrogeology - DCO Requirements - Mitigation & Monitoring - Marine Licence Please follow the link below to the complete representation. If the link does not open automatically copy and paste into your browser. http://infrastructure.planningportal.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Steve-Allison-relevant-representation.pdf"
Awdurdodau Lleol
Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council.
"Neath Port Talbot Country Borough Council considers that the project has the potential to have significant effects both positively and negatively upon this complex and highly dynamic coastal environment, as well as the associated communities, biodiversity and economic interests associated with it. As such, the Authority would wish to see the following relevant issues appraised through the examination process: 1) Coastal Processes and Biodiversity: These are extremely complex issues, with the project having the potential to impact directly and indirectly upon both the terrestrial and marine environments, as well as commercial and tourism economies of the area. Concerns remain about the potential uncertainties within the applicant’s submitted assessments, proposed monitoring and potential mitigation measures, particularly upon the wider marine and coastal environments, increased flood risk and the protected areas of Crymlyn Burrows (SSSI) and Kenfig (SSSI, SAC and NNR). 2) Sewerage Outfall: We are concerned about the potential associated risks with the developer’s apparent preferred option to retain the sewerage outfall within the confines of the lagoon. Any failure of the proposed system would adversely impact upon water quality, but could also irreparably damage the reputation of Swansea Bay as a tourism destination, and would jeopardise the lagoons chances of becoming a regional resource for water sports, tourism, and hatcheries. 3) Cabling and Grid Connection: These are shown to pass along the existing Fabian Way corridor, within a constricted area already carrying significant fibre-optic cabling. Additionally, the proposal is for the cabling to cross through Crymlyn Burrows (SSSI). The applicant’s have identified that a 10m wide working corridor would be required and that access would have to be retained for maintenance and testing. The potential impacts upon both the existing fibre-optic network, as well as the ecological impacts need to be fully considered. 4) Highway Network: The Tidal Lagoon has the potential to become a significant tourism destination in its own right, hosting regional water associated events. The impact upon the highway network needs to be fully assessed over both the short term, associated with the construction phase and the long term impacts associated with its tourism draw. 5) Ground Contamination: The area has a long industrial history resulting in both known and unknown potential for ground contamination. The Authority has a duty to ensure the health of future users and construction workers is protected. While it is known that some significant remediation works have taken place, there are other areas which need further consideration, such as the use of the existing BP pipes to run the cabling across the River Neath, as well as the development’s impact upon previously remediated areas. 6) Socio-economic Impacts: Undoubtedly during the construction phase the development would have the potential to be a major economic generator. However the Authority is concerned about the potential risks associated with the failure of the project to complete construction and the unpredicted impacts that partial completion could have upon the biodiversity, coastal processes, navigable waters, tourism and commercial economies and the visual amenity of the wider area. Please follow the link below to see addtion to the rep. If this link does not open automatically please copy and paste into your browser. http://infrastructure.planningportal.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Neath-Port-Talbot-County-Borough-Council-relevant-representation.pdf"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
NPTC Group
"The NPTC Group which consists of a number of educational companies, together with what was the former Neath Port Talbot College and Coleg Powys, which merged last year (2013), wishes to offer its support to the planning application made by the Tidal Lagoon (Swansea Bay) PLC – ‘TLSB’ for consent to build the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon. NPTC Group is a large business organisation which has responsibility for the provision of further education and training in an area representing a third of the land mass of Wales. It employs in excess of 1,100 people and had around 23,000 students in 2013-2014. NPTC Group offers a wide range of qualifications to support people within its areas of responsibility to progress into Higher Education and also into the world of work. It serves a number of industrial employers within the Swansea Bay region and it believes that the TLSB proposal will provide outstanding benefits to businesses and the Swansea Bay region itself. The Swansea Bay region has a proud industrial heritage and a significant number of jobs in specialist industries will be created during the construction, operation and maintenance of the TLSB proposal. We have an extensive apprenticeship scheme within the industries required to build and maintain the Tidal Lagoon and we are best placed to support this, particularly meeting our agenda of a clean and sustainable energy sector; again, another area within which we are leaders in Wales. NPTC Group and the Swansea City Bay region itself would greatly benefit from the TLSB proposal, both with the production of clean and sustainable energy, together with the increase in opportunities for our learners in the development and maintenance of this project and the job creation that comes with it. Indeed, it would benefit a significant number of our learners, not only in the construction engineering departments, but also, for example, in relation to hospitality, as technology tourism will increase within the region. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Professor Michael Collins
"By way of introduction, I am an Emeritus Professor in the School of Ocean and Earth Science, University of Southampton; also, am in receipt of a Fellowship at the University of the Basque Country, northern Spain. I have wide-ranging (over 35 years) experience in the study of sediments (mud, sand and gravel),in both laboratory and field investigations, i.e. their supply, transport and deposition, in environments ranging from the headwaters of rivers to the deep ocean - with emphasis on the coast and inner continental shelf. I trained originally as a civil engineer and was based in the Department of Oceanography ,Swansea, from 1973 to 1986 - subsequently, at Southampton. Over the whole of this period of time, I have maintained an interest in the sediment dynamics (water and sediment movement) in Swansea Bay and the Bristol Channel - on which we have published extensively. Against the above background, I was part of the Sediments Working Group of the original Severn Barrage investigation. I am most happy to express my support for the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon Project, which is innovative, exciting and achievable. Tidal power in the Severn Estuary/Bristol Channel system should be utilised, in view of the large tidal ranges caused by width and depth constrictions in the main channel, in response to co-oscillations with tides in the Celtic Sea. Likewise, tides are a predictable and available energy source. Such an approach would provide inexpensive and clean power. The construction will cause some modification to the existing patterns of water and sediment movement, but these can be investigated using available "state-of the-art" techniques. The habitats of birds and marine life will also need to be studied. At the same time, there will be a need to optimise the design of the breakwater. In summary, based upon an earlier press release, " the tidal lagoon concept ....is a great example of how innovative engineering could be used to harness our natural resources and provide clean, sustainable and predictable power for thousands of homes" I concur with these observations and statements. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Rhossili Working Group (RWG) (Rhossili Working Group (RWG))
"Rhossili Working Group Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay: Relevant Representation 11th April 2014 We are generally supportive of this application and of this form of green energy, though we have several concerns which we hope will be addressed. Harbour porpoise and nomination of Bristol Channel as a SAC 1.Location: in a report of October 2012, the World Wildlife Fund recommended the Outer Bristol Channel (which includes Swansea Bay) as a Special Area of Conservation for the harbour porpoise, a ‘vulnerable’ species listed in the European Habitats Directive (1992). You will be aware that on 21st June 2013, the Directorate-General Environment of the European Commission began legal proceedings against the UK Government in respect of the Government’s failure to nominate SACs for the harbour porpoise in UK waters. The Commission stated that the delay in nominating SACs had allowed potentially damaging developments to be considered. The legal action is on-going. Consideration needs to be given in the Examination to the legal position of developments being progressed by the UK Government whilst the sea area concerned is the subject of European litigation, with particular reference to Annex 5 of the Habitats Directive. 2. The applicant has considered the possible effects of a large range of other ‘in-combination’ projects in the area, but has not included potential SAC status. 3. Extensive evidence points to Swansea Bay being an important breeding and nursery area for the harbour porpoise, eg. Pierpoint 2006 (Interim)) and Pierpoint 2008a. Accordingly, for work to proceed, a European Wildlife Derogation Licence is required. We ask if Natural Resources Wales (NRW) is the appropriate body to issue this licence, and request that the relevant instruments of delegation of these European powers are made available for public inspection. 4. Pierpoint 2008a. This report is cited in its own right in the table of references in the applicant’s Environmental Statement (ES), but elsewhere in the ES it is referenced indirectly via citations to the Atlantic Array Environmental Statement. The Atlantic Array proposal was withdrawn, so the inclusion of Pierpoint 2008a was never tested for validity. Pierpoint 2008a is the document which focuses directly on the harbour porpoise habitat in Swansea Bay and any application which does not include it must be deemed inadequate. However, it still seems to be not in the public domain, although we are aware of at least one current independent holder of this document. Thus the document can be available, and given the centrality of its importance to this application, we ask for the full release of this document into the public domain. We, Rhossili Working Group, hold a copy of the interim version, Pierpoint 2006: the content of 2008a is said to be very similar to 2006 Interim. We further ask if the applicant has directly read Pierpoint 2008a in preparing the Environmental Statement. 5. Vibro piling and percussive piling. We refer to Dahne et al (2013) which has not been referenced by the applicant. This report suggests that the avoidance area of the harbour porpoise to piling is much greater than currently promulgated distances. With Swansea Bay being a documented nursery area for the harbour porpoise, it is important that potential harmful or adverse effects are fully considered using the precautionary principle. Percussive piling is particularly intrusive. At the moment, the applicant is seeking ‘carte blanche’ to swap between vibro and percussive piling. We suggest that the use of percussive piling must be more rigorously circumscribed with strict conditions imposed on its use. We ask for the examination to enquire if there are seasons of the year when this development, especially piling, will not cause disturbance to the breeding cycle of this local population. 6. Any mitigation measures to combat potential adverse impacts on the harbour porpoise must be thoroughly evaluated and validated beforehand. 7. Persistent noise. Offshore works may continue 24 hours a day, creating uninterrupted noise at sea for the duration of the project. We ask for an analysis to show projected effects on the local harbour porpoise population of this prolonged exposure. Other concerns 8. Sediments. Again, the developer is seeking carte blanche to acquire aggregates generally. If the aggregates inside the lagoon prove to be unsuitable or inadequate filling material for the geo-tubes, there should be strict guidelines for the acquisition of aggregates from alternative sources. 9. As there will be reduced tidal circulation in the remaining inner part of Swansea bay, we express concern about the cumulating effects of any sewer or outfall into the inner Bay. 10. Sewer outfall from region of Fabian Way must be extended to release into the main tidal flow of the channel and not into the lagoon itself. We may wish to comment on other aspects of the proposal as they occur during the Examination. "
Sefydliadau Anstatudol
RSPB
"The RSPB recognises that the Severn Estuary could be an important source of renewable energy. We believe this potential can be sustainably realised through initiating well-planned and monitored projects. The proposed project could fit this model. We welcome the Applicant’s constructive pre-application dialogue on ornithological matters and will continue to work with the Applicant in an attempt to resolve any outstanding issues throughout the Pre-Examination stage. The site is close to two SSSIs: Blackpill and Crymyln Burrows. Blackpill is of national importance due to the numbers of wintering and passage ringed plover and sanderling. Crymyln Burrows is primarily designated for its sand dune habitat, and is home to a high tide wader roost. The RSPB is concerned about indirect impacts of changes in coastal processes on the Blackpill SSSI through fine sediment deposition which may adversely affect ringed plover and sanderling, species of national importance which require sandy substrata. However, we will defer to the expertise of NRW on the issue of coastal processes themselves. The RSPB is also concerned at the risks to fish particularly herring, through noise, turbine mortality and loss of spawning grounds. Herring is the main food source for the great crested grebe, which is present in nationally important numbers. We remain to be convinced about the efficacy of the mitigation measures proposed for herring. However, we will defer to NRW on this matter. Whilst we acknowledge the Applicant’s efforts to predict risks to bird populations, we are concerned about the robustness of the assessment of the Project’s impacts on bird populations and how these are addressed. For example: • Lack of data, including through-the-tide bird counts • Lack of analysis of ringed plover and sanderling passage populations • Lack of clarity in presentation of intertidal habitat loss • No area figures available for functional loss through disturbance • Uncertainty whether the proposed mitigation and enhancement measures will deliver the benefits intended We will articulate these concerns in our Written Representations. Given the novelty of this type of project, the continuing uncertainties over environmental impacts, and the appetite for roll-out of similar projects in the future (including the Applicant’s declared ambitions for several other sites in English and Welsh waters) it is essential that a comprehensive and robust monitoring package be put in place to inform future development proposals and impact assessment. In addition, we would advocate the inclusion of a test-bed facility within the Project, through an extension of the monitoring programme, which would allow for developing technologies to be tested. We appreciate that this may be outside the remit of the Examining Authority, but we will pursue this matter with the Applicant outside the Examination. We anticipate only being involved in the process through Written Representations. We will not seek to participate in the Examination Hearings, but will be pleased to answer any questions from the Examining Authority. The RSPB reserves the right to add to/amend its position in the light of any new information submitted by the Applicant or other Interested Parties. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Russell George AM
"As the Shadow Minister for Agriculture and National Resources I agree to the general principle behind the tidal power application, as I think it could be an important model for the future of renewable energy in Wales. Obviously consideration for the insfrastrucure during building needs to be fully considered with regard to how it interacts with other developments in the area at the time. This could include both the potential for a positive interaction between them. Once such example of this would be the planned construction of Tata Steel’s new power plant at their Port Talbot steelworks site. This is due to potentially be built at the same time and they, as with Swansea Tidal Lagoon, have suggested the use of Swansea’s harbour to deliver constructions materials for the build. Tata have indicated that they would be open to discussions with Swansea Tidal Lagoon with regard to sharing facilities where possible. It's also important that any local objections are properly listened to and where possible mitigated."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
S Penny
"I support the application . I am sure that any environmental issues , if any, are capable of being addressed. The scheme would bring significant and transformational economic benefits to an area which under performs economically against the rest of the UK. Not only would short term economic benefits accrue but the technology development could be centred in the City and be established as a centre of excellence to serve other UK schemes with consequent long term economic benefits. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Salento Ristorantre ltd
"I am the managinbg director of the new italian restaurant in swansea marina "SALENTO" ristorante ltd. The lagoon will attract a lot of locals and tourists, will be 'a breath of relief for all commercial activities aroundf this area in my opinion and many other needs more attractions. Not to mention the fact that there will be sports centers for young people to marine activities. We are in favor of the lagoon to 100%"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
response has attachments
Sir John Houghton
"I have been involved in the science of Climate Change for over 30 years. In particular I was a founding member in 1988 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and chairman or co-chairman of the Panel's Science Working Group for the first 3 reports in 1990,1995 and 2001. Since then I have lectured and written extensively (see my recent autobiography 'In the eye of the storm' published by Lion Publishing 2013) about the science of climate change and the action that needs to be taken in all the world's countries to control the growth of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide that are emitted by the burning of coal, oil and gas. The world community of climate scientists are virtually certain that the heat waves, storms and floods that have recently been experienced in many parts of the world will continue to grow in their frequency and intensity, and more so unless urgent action is taken to replace fossil fuel energy by carbon free energy. Further, the rise in sea level that is already beginning to create problems with sea defences will continue to rise more rapidly – probably by up to about a metre this century. There is therefore a very urgent need to replace fossil fuel energy by carbon free energy. The means to do that are available – we just have to get on with it. Around the UK's coasts are some of the largest tides in the world which if harnessed could generate a lot of energy that would be essentially carbon free. In particular, tidal schemes in the Severn Estuary and along the coast of North Wales would be able to generate energy throughout the whole of the day and could more than provide for all Wales' electricity needs. The proposal for a tidal lagoon in Swansea Bay provides a wonderful start to the sort of energy transformation that is so urgently required. It is an excellent proposal that considers in careful detail the possible impacts of the project and suggests ways in which the tidal lagoon can bring wide ranging environmental benefits to ecosystems as well as human communities. The provision for Wales and the UK of satisfactory future energy supplies urgently needs to be addressed from a long term point of view. It is important that the scheme in Swansea Bay should not be seen as a one- off. Its construction will bring excitement and jobs and also begin to map the way in which future such projects can proceed. The long term aim (and not so long term!) should be for the reliable, secure, long term energy provision from tidal schemes that Wales is pioneering in Swansea Bay to be taken on board by the rest of Wales - and the UK. The short term cost of their construction is bound to be high but the long term cost is very low. Further there are many intermediate benefits in terms of reliability, jobs, technology, economics and excitement that are very worth while. Sir John Houghton CBE FLSW FRS "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Sketty Primary
"As part of the school’s curriculum as defined by Welsh Government pupils have to have access to a curriculum which promotes Education For Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship (ESDGC) - July 2008. There is a need to manage and organise the curriculum to include ESDGC ideas and experiences. Therefore, in the overview of all schemes of work, appropriate opportunities for the development of ESDGC have been identified. It is through the development of ESDGC the pupils develop their knowledge and understanding of the key concepts:- • Interdependence - understanding how people, the environment and the economy are linked at all levels from local to global. • Citizenship and stewardship – recognising the importance of taking individual responsibility and action to make the world a better place. • Needs and rights – understanding our own basic needs and about human rights and the implications for the needs of future generations of actions taken today. • Diversity – understanding, respecting and valuing both human diversity – cultural, social and economic and biodiversity. As part of the Common Inspection Framework Estyn would question whether pupils have opportunities to develop and extend awareness of ESDGC and whether they understand what it is. They would also question whether a school has adequate resource to deliver the curriculum for ESDGC and whether its staff are sufficiently trained? It is difficult for us to meet the demands placed upon us to deliver these requirements. We recognise that the ethos of our school is as influential as the taught curriculum and we seek to nurture positive attitudes towards the environment and sustainable living. We have an Eco Committee which has helped to develop and promote the ethos of ESDGC through positive actions in and around the school and the local community. However, this alone is not sufficient and there are clear implications for staff training, resourcing and timetabling of activities to promote learning in this area. As a school we feel that the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon Project would enhance pupils’ learning in this area. It will enable us to have access to a powerful, innovative teaching resource which would clearly demonstrate to our pupils how our natural resources can be used as a source of renewable, sustainable energy. The expertise of those involved in the project, for example the Education Officer, would have a positive impact on promoting positive attitudes to the environment and global awareness. This is essential if pupils are to value it and understand their role in safeguarding it for the future. As professionals we feel that many of our pupils do not have access to a quality environment during their leisure time. The Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay would provide families with free access to opportunities for learning outside school hours. It would be a place to promote physical activities, access to open spaces, play and quality family time together. These experiences will ultimately impact on pupils’ ability to perform in school. “Research into the ‘significant life experiences’ that determine our connection to the environment, and our attitudes and values, reveals that positive direct contact or ‘first-hand’ experience has the greatest impact (NFER, 2004). Evidence also points to the fact that children gain their most powerful understanding of their natural environment through exploring it for themselves” (WAG Out of Classroom Learning – October 2007) "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Stephen Tindale
"Tidal Lagoon Power’s application to construct a lagoon off Swansea should be given planning consent. The Sustainable Development Commission (SDC) published a report on tidal power in 2007. This said: “Commentators have speculated about the potential of tidal lagoons as a sustainable energy source, but until a project is developed, there is little information about the real economic and environmental impacts. The Commission also found no evidence to support the proposal that large-scale tidal lagoon development in the Severn Estuary would be environmentally or economically preferable to a barrage. The Commission therefore recommends that Government seeks to develop the world’s first tidal lagoon demonstration project, responding to strong public interest in the lagoon concept, and enabling the collection of essential environmental and economic data.” Seven years later, there is at last a demonstration project waiting to be constructed. This would be a world first. That is why there is no evidence that lagoons in the Severn would be “environmentally or economically preferable to a barrage” – none has ever been built, anywhere. The SDC was right to encourage the Government to develop one. The indications in Tidal Lagoon Power’s extensive Environmental Impact Assessment are that the environmental effect of this lagoon would be preferable to a barrage. But scientific evidence is needed, so this project should be given planning consent. The potential benefits for UK energy security and climate mitigation of this project are clear and substantial. So are the potential business benefits. A successful British tidal lagoon sector could export the technology to France, North America, India, South Korea and China. These potential benefits look likely to materialise, but need to be demonstrated and proved. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Swansea Fishermen on behalf of Swansea Fishermen
"Notice of Objection to a Proposed Tidal Lagoon off Swansea East Breakwater Swansea fishermen’s group, representing the following fishermen, object to this proposal.           The above fishermen make this objection insomuch that it is neither flippant nor feckless. The above have fished within the proposed site in each and every year for numerous years. The above fishermen will quantify that the others within this group have fished in this area for a minimum of 5 years consecutively and preceding the date of this correspondence. The above fishermen acknowledge that there are a number of fishermen not making this joint response. The above fishermen do not recognise that other fishermen meet the criteria set out as reasonable by the group. The above group have complied with enactment of law regarding their fishing activities. Reasons for objection. FISHERIES The reader will recognise the importance of this topic to us, in so much as; Loss of opportunity Fishermen will lose an area vital to their economic survivability. It is an enormous area which has different target species and benthic communities than adjacent areas. Within the proposed Lagoon site the following species are or have been traditionally targeted; Lobsters, whelks, green and red crabs, oysters, cuttle fish, bass, sole, mullet. Herring? The list is not finite. The winter fishery for whelks, oysters and fish species is vital. Inclement winter weather reduces opportunity elsewhere. Trawling takes place to the southern half of the proposed development. The area has probably the largest stock of native oysters within Swansea Bay. One Swansea fisherman has consistently prosecuted the oyster beds year on year in contradiction to the scoping document submitted by TL. Shoals of herring uniquely choose this area to spawn. Local fishermen use this as an opportunity to target them, often catching in excess of 1 tonne during this time. In December and January, February and March cod and bass frequent this area because of the spawning herring and are targeted. The cod are in the 1-2 kilo size. The Swansea and Neath River stock of herring may well be a genetically distinct population from the Milford Haven stock. Loss of their spawning grounds will undoubtedly be catastrophic for the population. We have concerns that the construction phase of the Lagoon development will have serious negative effects on commercial fisheries in the Bay. It is well known that underwater noise disturbs commercial fish species and the works will deter our target species from entering the Bay and surrounding area. Not only will the fisheries within the footprint of the Lagoon be lost but our fishing grounds around the Bay will be affected. Furthermore, we are concerned by the level of suspended sediments that will result from the construction phase. The sediments in Swansea Bay may very well contain high levels of chemical and heavy metal contaminants from the long history of heavy industry in the Swansea and Neath Valleys. The suspended sediments and contaminants will deter fish from entering the Bay and surrounding areas and will degrade in the longer term our other fishing grounds. Loss of Habitat Habitat for resident species will be destroyed by the project. The spawning area for herring and the oyster beds will be engulfed by the Lagoon. Loss of this essential fish habitat is very likely to result in a serious biodiversity impact with the consequent impact to a distinct fish population. The oyster beds within the footprint of the lagoon are the most important in the Bay. These beds are probably the last refuge of the Swansea Bay native oyster population. It is acknowledged that the rock armour to the proposed development will provide a reef effect. This will/may provide an ideal habitat for decapods but at the expense of the surrounding area. Whelks, although a mobile species will be displaced to inaccessible areas. COASTAL PROCESSES Change in tidal conditions. The Lagoon construction will significantly alter the anticlockwise gyre in the tide which exists, and sediment deposition. We have concerns that the significant changes to the gyre and hydrodynamic regime in the Bay will affect sediment patterns and therefore fish distributions. We have a concern that the Western half of the Bay will suffer from increased sedimentation and silt up. Insufficient modelling has been carried out to determine the effect over the entire bay. ELECTROMAGNETIC EFFECT Electromagnetic fields impacting on elasmobranches Elasmobranches detect their prey using sensors and determine the location of their food using electromagnetic fields. Jersey marine beach has long been recognised as a nursery area for small eyed ray. Loss of marine communities. Marine life in its entirety will be engulfed by the project. The seabed within the footprint of the lagoon supports a diverse series of seabed communities and habitats. It is this diversity that currently supports our local fisheries. The loss of these habitats and communities will directly impact on our livelihoods and the wider ecology of the Bay. Species that we target elsewhere in the bay rely on this ground for spawning habitat, nursery areas and seasonal feeding grounds, its loss is of great concern to us. Navigation The group considers that “backwash” in the navigational channel will adversely affect small boats egressing and entering the Tawe River basin. We do not believe that the effects of the Lagoon on tidal and wind generated currents have been sufficiently investigated and represent a clear health and safety risk to our vessels and crews. VISUAL IMPACT No comment NEEDS AND BENEFIT No comment ALTERNATIVE SITES Little has been said about this. East of the Nash lighthouse there would be no visual effect, no impact on fishing, no impact on navigation and a more dynamic tidal flow. LANDSCAPE AND COASTLINE. No comment Water quality Construction will effect water quality and turbidity. We The proposed Tidal Lagoon will most definitely disadvantage commercial fishermen. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Swansea University
"I am making a representation on behalf of student sport at Swansea University in support of the TLSB Proposal. Swansea Bay proposal. Sport Swansea has over 3500 members competing in our 50 student sports clubs in the University. Within the 50 sports clubs we have numerous watersports who would benefit from the facilities at the Tidal Lagoon - Canoe, Rowing, Sailing, Windsurfing, Kitesurfing, Sub Aqua TLSB proposal will provide the following benefits to our organisation and the Bay area: Second campus; Those students based on the Bay Campus will be in close proximity to the edge of the lagoon providing opportunities for leisure activity, competition and tourism, as well as health and well-being opportunities. Sport Clubs Activity; Many of our sports clubs will benefit from the opportunities that will arise from the TLSB project such as river rowing, kayaking, windsurfing and other events. Students have expressed a keen interest in having such a secure and safe facility to enable them to train and compete in their sport. Potential Storage opportunities; Currently our sports clubs are with limited storage with their equipment not located in one secure facility. Usage of the Lagoon coupled with storage opportunities will give our clubs a base that they so desperately need. Tourism; If the TLSB project were able to host local or International Sporting tournaments and competitions, people from all around the globe would be here to see our town and facilities Swansea has to offer. This in turn would lead to potential future students and increase in numbers into our sports clubs. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Swansea watersports
"I am the owner of Swansea Watersports & Oxwich Watersports. Swansea Watersports is located close to the Swansea Docks. Swansea Watersports has been running for more than 9 years and is a RYA accredited centre for Sailing, Power boating, Jet skiing, Kayaking, Windsurfing and Theory courses. Swansea Watersports offers adventure activities and extreme sports for the individual, families, groups of friends and corporate entertainment. Our AALA license also means that we are certified to work with children, so school and activity groups are more than welcome. We are able to offer instruction for any level of experience from beginners to intermediate or expert. All of our courses are run around the spectacular Gower Peninsula from Swansea Bay to Loughor estuary. These venues provide fantastic views and also give the best teaching environment in all conditions. We are generally very supportive of the Tidal Lagoon project because of the additional benefits that it would bring in addition to the generation of renewable energy. The lagoon is offering a fantastic new location in Swansea for Watersports to be taught and participated in, in a safe and more controllable environment. This would be particularly beneficial to learners and school children. We would be very keen to work with the Lagoon deliver Watersports. We own a large amount of equipment and are running an ever increasing number of courses, we are currently limited by the size of the Swansea Docks that we currently use when we require more sheltered water and we are restricted by tide time when launching from Swansea Bay. The Lagoon offer a good sized area for all the activities that we currently run and are looking to develop into plus it would offer water access during all tides. This summer we will start a three year programme to work with disadvantaged children giving them the opportunity to try sailing. We see this as an important achievement for our company and a start of something that we could further develop in Swansea and South Wales. We also see the opportunity for the lagoon to be a location for large Watersports competitions and have been involved in the organising of such events in Swansea. We would like to see Swansea be able to offer a location for the holding of competitions such as extreme sailing and Thundercat races. We do have concerns regarding the development of the Tidal lagoon, with its Watersports facilities in that it would be offering the same services that our company currently does and we fear that this may have a detrimental impact on our established business. Our location means that we don’t have walk-in trade and our customers tend to be driven through ours and linked websites and word of mouth. Therefore whilst we support the concept of the Tidal Lagoon, we would also like to be involved in the provision of Watersports and would be interested in discussing possibly moving our established business to the Lagoon, once construction etc. is complete. Ceri Davies Swansea Watersports Tel: 07989839878 "
Ymgyngoreion Statudol Eraill
The Coal Authority
"The Coal Authority has received a letter dated 10 March 2014 from DLA Piper UK LLP as our organisation is considered by TLSB to have land interests that may be affected as part of this development proposal. As The Coal Authority "owns" the nations coal resources on behalf of the State, it is assumed that some element of this proposal is considered likely to intersect with our underground mineral estate. The Coal Authority does not have any specific comments to make on this proposal but, in light of the above, would take this opportunity to make the applicant of the need for them to have regard to Section 10 of the Coal Industry Act 1994. If the applicant has any queries regarding this matter, they can contact our Legal Department on 01623 637 333 to discuss."
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
The Salmon & Trout Association
"The Salmon & Trout Association (S&TA) recognises the potential of Severn Estuary to produce an important source of renewable energy, but believes any development must put environmental protection at its core. S&TA remains concerned at the risks to fish, particularly migratory fish such as salmon and sea trout, but also marine species utilising the estuary, such as herring. With limited information about how the populations use the estuary, we believe further research is required to investigate how the lagoon and its construction would impact fish populations through noise, disturbance, turbine mortality and loss of spawning/feeding grounds. Intertidal habitat is recognised as a key feeding, refugia and nursery habitat area for birds and fish, but it also delivers many other ecosystem services including nutrient and carbon storage, flood defense and removing atmospheric particulate matter, therefore improving air quality. We are concerned about the lack of clarity about intertidal habitat loss and unconvinced about the efficacy of the mitigation measures proposed. It is essential that a comprehensive and robust monitoring package be put in place to inform this and future development proposals and impact assessments. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Tourism Swansea Bay
"Tourism Swansea Bay is an independent membership trade organisation that represents the views of over 350 tourism, leisure and hospitality businesses in the Swansea Bay area – Swansea Bay includes both Swansea and Neath Port Talbot County Council areas. On asking for members views concerning the Tidal Lagoon it has been a resounding ‘yes’ in support of the Tidal Lagoon… with only 3 concerns made… 1, the movement of sand on and off of the beaches in Swansea Bay / creating sandbanks 2, condition of water in the lagoon should the over flow sewer pipe not be addressed 3, existing water based activity providers would be keen to work with Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon All of these concerns appear to have be considered and addressed by Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon. We therefore look forward to a positive outcome and welcoming the Tidal Lagoon to Swansea Bay. "
Ymgyngoreion Statudol Eraill
Trinity House
"Dear Sirs PROPOSED TIDAL LAGOON SWANSEA BAY (GENERATING STATION) ORDER Trinity House is the General Lighthouse Authority for England, Wales, the Channel Islands and Gibraltar with powers principally derived from the Merchant Shipping Act 1995 (as amended). The role of Trinity House as a General Lighthouse Authority under the Act includes the superintendence and management of all lighthouses, buoys and beacons within our area of jurisdiction. Trinity House wishes to be a registered interested party due to the impact the development would have on navigation within Trinity House’s area of jurisdiction. It is likely that we will have further comments to make on the application and the draft Order throughout the application process. AIDS TO NAVIGATION Trinity House has made an initial assessment of the draft Order submitted with the application dated February 2014. We note the savings provision for Trinity House in Article 49. Article 19 (Survey of tidal works) – should the reference to the Secretary of State be replaces with a reference to the Welsh Government? Article 20 (Lights on tidal works etc. during contraction) – we consider that this artcle should be amended to provide: “…during the whole time of the construction, reconstruction, extension, enlargement, replacement, relaying or alteration thereof exhibit such lightsand take such other steps for the prevention of danger to navigation as Welsh Government may from time to time direct.” Article 22 (Permanent lights on tidal works) – amend to provide: “After the completion of a tidal work the undertaker shall exhibit such lights and take such other steps for the prevention of danger to navigation as Trinity House may from time to time direct.” INTEREST IN LAND Trinity House is also a prescribed person within sections 56 and 57 of the Planning Act 2008. The plans submitted with the application do not appear to show that Trinity House’s land would be subject to the compulsory acquisition powers sought in the application. However Trinity House considers that its land may be injuriously affected by the development and that accordingly Trinity House may have a right to compensation. Please direct correspondence regarding the draft Order to both of the following email addresses: [email protected] and [email protected] Yours faithfully Anna Gibb Legal Advisor Trinity House Direct Dial: 020 7481 6962 E-Mail: [email protected] "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
VALEMO on behalf of VALOREM
"First of all, I’d like to say that we are in full support of Swansea bay’s “Tidal Lagoon Project” VALOREM, a pioneer in the renewable energy development field in France, feels that we most encourage and enhance all natural energies, included of course tidal energy. Indeed, today tidal energy’s world potential is currently under-exploited. It can be increased to reach an amount of energy equal to 380 TWh per annum, for only 160 GW of installed power plants. So why aren’t we enhancing this capacity? Too often, the negative environmental impact that results from tidal energy production is underlined. If it’s true that the ecosystem is partially altered because these tidal cycles, are no longer lunar cycles, do other human activity have no impact? Do tidal energy power plants have the same devastating industrial risks that grey energy power plants have? We feel that environmental disadvantages are much lower compared to all the benefits gained by Swansea bays project (energy without greenhouse gas emission or industrial risks, decentralized production, participative project, jobs, tourism …). France is a pioneer country in the tidal energy development field, with La Rance’s power plant (In operation since 1966). This installation, based near Saint-Malo (Mont Saint Michel bay), generated doubts and opposition before its installation, today however, there are no longer any difficulties, only benefits, and the project now receives a total approbation from both inhabitants and administrations, and all technical concerns have been erased. This project is a complete success, and an example to develop other sites... like the one in Swansea! It‘s obvious of course that we have to create installations where tide energy potential is maximal, and profit from the innovations to tidal energy turbines, power regulation systems and electricity transport improvements. If we look for an instance at French history, we can see that hundreds of tide mills were built along our coasts. It’s the proof that our ancestors saw the interest in enhancing all energies, so why do we have to deprive ourselves from this energy today ? To conclude, I would like to quote some words from VALOREM’s creator, Mr Jean-Yves GRANDIDIER : “Our children’s future depends on how our generation will deal with both energy crisis and global warming. With a responsible and efficient approach to our consumption methods, renewable energies are the keys for a sustainable development. Each region has their own renewable energy potentials whether it be wind energy, sun energy, sea energy, firewood or biogas. It’s everyone’s responsibility to use renewable resources to make, our planet, a better place for future generations.” Mr Antoine POISSON, VALEMO’s operation director, a VALOREM’s subsidiary "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
VALEMO on behalf of VALOREM
"VALOREM"
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Verdi's Cafe and Restaurant
"I am the Manager of Verdi’s, a family run Café, Ice Cream Parlour and Licensed Restaurant with a reputation for authentic Italian flavour and quality food and on behalf of Verdis Café want to express our support for the Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay (TLSB) project. We are situated on the sea front in the Victorian fishing village of Mumbles in Swansea with indoor and outdoor seating for up to 400 persons, every seat enjoys the spectacular panoramic views across Swansea Bay. The construction of the world’s first tidal lagoon in Swansea is something for residents to be proud of. The construction of ground breaking new technology in Swansea is not a first for this city given that historically the world’s first passenger railway was situated along what is now the Mumbles and Swansea promenade. This unique lagoon construction along with the proposed recreational and sporting facilities will be a huge attraction for visitors from all round the world. We believe that an increase in visitors to an attraction on the Eastern side of the Bay will inevitably increase visitors to the Western side and throughout the entire bay. We experienced an increase in sales and profits as a direct impact from another Italian Restaurant being opened within a mile of our premises purely because it increased the number of people visiting this side of the Bay. Verdi’s will offer a prime viewing location for the lagoon where residents and visitors can enjoy the view of Swansea Bay and admire the modern architecture and design of the lagoon wall and visitor buildings whilst seeking refreshment. In addition we hope that visitors to the lagoon who walk along the seawall to the offshore visitors centre will spot our building on the opposite side of the Bay and will naturally want to visit and explore the Mumbles. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Warm Wales~Cymru Gynnes CBC - Community Interest Company
"Warm Wales is a Community Interest Company set up in 2004 by National Grid to assist in the alleviation of Fuel Poverty throughout Wales and SWest England - where we have implemented over 80,000 fuel saving measures. I am currently CEO of Warm Wales but in a previous role as Director of Development ( including Planning & Estates & Economic Development ) for City & County of Swansea, I was responsible for development activity and received presentations on the original lagoon concept ( for a much smaller off-shore lagoon in 2001/2002.) The principal submissions are in support of the proposals, and seeking ways in which the benefits of the overall development ( energy and land opportunities ) can be delivered to help relieve fuel poverty and create employment opportunities - as an exemplar project. Concept We believe the concept is bold and visionary and well-developed Renewable Energy We applaud the use of Renewable Energy and will amplify on this. We also believe there may be extra opportunity for secondary renewables which could be examined once the main scheme is granted consent. We would encourage consideration of creating a local ESCO to directly benefit local city residents and especially help provide energy at lower unit costs to tackle fuel poverty. We are currently developing concepts for an adjacent waterfront site called Helios. This development maximises use of renewables and will be entirely complementary with the 'exemplar' lagoon renewables project. We will expand on this at the hearing and the ways in which the developments would reinforce Swansea as a leading 'European Eco City' Design & Economic Benefits The low-key nature of the development and public access and economic uses is to be applauded. The masterplanning of the surrounding land gives opportunities for energy-conversion and local energy use - such as next-generation hydrogen and fuel-cell development ( eg Next-Energy Technium Park. There are a host of business-job-creating opportunities including destination tourism venues and events. Specific opportunities exist to promote use of electric vehicles ( cycles/cars/buses ) Environment We appreciate that the scale of the development will have certain environmental impacts. We will not comment directly on adverse impacts and mitigations as they require specialist consideration. We would however wish to support the use of the 'reef' and water containment for local food production and encouraging habitats for bird and sea life. "
Aelodau’r Cyhoedd/Busnesau
Welsh Rowing
"The below representation is written on behalf of Welsh Rowing and its affiliated clubs. Welsh Rowing is the National Governing Body for all elements of Rowing in Wales. We are supportive of the proposed Tidal Lagoon as it links to 2 key parts of our Strategy. Firstly, we have an ambition to double the number of people regularly participating in rowing by 2017 in the first instance; we will then be striving for continual growth from 2017 onwards. The building of this facility and its sheltered water area would provide a safe and accessible training space for beginners and junior wishing to experience coastal rowing. The sheltered water would allow them to learn the required skills and techniques in a relatively closed environment therefore gaining confidence before heading out onto the open sea. This will attract not only new participants from Swansea but also the surrounding areas and with the right marketing, the whole of Wales. Secondly, we are striving to bring more international events to Wales and over the next few years will be working hard (with the support of the Welsh Sea Rowing Association) to attract high profile coastal rowing events including the World Rowing Coastal Championships and see the National Water sports centre as a key part of our bid for this prestigious event. The hosting of this, and other associated events would propel Wales to the forefront of the Coastal scene in the UK and mean we were being recognised alongside other European countries such as Sweden (2013 Hosts) and Italy (2011 Hosts) In summary, the completion of the proposed project would provide a solid platform for Welsh Rowing to achieve our development, performance and recognition targets and would help ensure the sustainability of the Coastal clubs in the Swansea area and potentially Wales in the future "
Ymgyngoreion Statudol Eraill
Ymddiriedolaeth Genedlaethol / National Trust Wales
"The National Trust is a conservation charity established in 1895 governed by its own Acts of Parliament (1907 - 1971) which define its purpose as, “promoting the permanent preservation of lands and buildings of natural beauty and historic interest for the benefit of the nation.” Although independent of government, we have been given the unique power to declare our property inalienable. Such property has to be held and cared for in perpetuity. It cannot be sold. Before property is declared inalienable, it must be shown to be of outstanding national importance for its natural beauty or historic interest. We have been actively involved in the management of land and coastline on Gower since 1933. On Gower, we now have 2226 hectares under our protective ownership, over 97% of which has been declared inalienable. Our ownership on Gower, which often extends to Mean Low Water, encompasses some 26 miles of coastline - estimated as 75% of the Gower coastline. The Gower Peninsula was the first Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) in Britain. Section 85 of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 requires relevant authorities, including Ministers, to have regard to the purpose of conserving and enhancing the natural beauty of the area of outstanding natural beauty when exercising any function so as to affect land in an AONB. The primary objective for designating AONBs is the conservation and enhancement of their natural beauty. AONBs are of equal status to National Parks in terms of landscape and scenic beauty. Great weight should be given to conserving and enhancing their natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage. (Planning Policy Wales, 5.3.5-7). The beaches are a significant part of the natural beauty of Gower but have been vulnerable to change in the past, with reduced sand cover resulting in exposure of underlying material. The National Trust believes strongly in the need to grow renewable energy generation and wean ourselves off fossil fuels. However, each proposal should be located, designed and on a scale that avoids compromising the special qualities of its locality. Chapter 6 of the Environmental Statement addresses coastal processes and sediment transport. Paragraph 6.1.0.4 defines a far field extending to Worms Head. However the ES contains no assessment of the impacts of the project on the south Gower beaches or explanation of its omission. The ES identifies changes to sand transport that could have implication for the sediment regime associated with the south Gower beaches. These include the cessation of sediment transport from west to east across Swansea Bay (6.5.2.24); a reduction in ebb transport out of the bay once sand has accumulated (6.5.2.60); and increased trapping potential of the western region of the bay (6.5.2.65). We contend that examination of the project must include robust consideration of impacts on the south Gower beaches. Without such consideration, it is not possible to assess the project’s full impacts; discharge the section 85 duty; identify appropriate mitigation; or design a monitoring package to test the model predictions to inform future projects. "