Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid)

The list below includes a record of advice we have provided for this project. For a list of all advice issued by the Planning Inspectorate, including non-project related advice, please go to the Register of advice page.

There is a statutory duty, under section 51 of the Planning Act 2008, to record the advice that is given in relation to an application or a potential application, including the name of the person who requested the advice, and to make this publicly available.

Preview
Enquiry received via meeting
response has attachments
A meeting held between both National Grid and SP Manweb to discuss whether there was any impact as a result of the conjoined inquiry into 5 onshore wind farms and one electric line in Mid Wales.

11 September 2015
National Grid
Enquiry received via meeting
response has attachments
Meeting between the Planning Inspectorate and National Grid in relation to the proposed Mid Wales Electricity Connection project.
Note of meeting attached.

13 August 2014
National Grid - Jacqui Fenn
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
National Grid informed the Planning Inspectorate that it is considering which aspects of the scheme will be applied for under the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 and which will be applied for under the Planning Act 2008, and the possibility of applying for some aspects of the scheme through both regimes.
If an element of the proposed scheme forms part of a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project (NSIP), then development consent must be obtained in accordance with s31 of the Planning Act 2008 as amended (?PA 2008?).

In relation to the proposal to include some elements of the project in both PA 2008 and Town and Country Planning Act (TCPA) applications; in order to include these elements within the PA 2008 application, National Grid (NG) would need to justify why it considers that these elements form part of the NSIP, as the definition of associated development has a very limited application in Wales and will not apply in the case of this application. The justification for their inclusion in the PA 2008 application would need to be consistent with the fact that applications for planning permission under the TCPA were also being made, and any contradictions in approach to what formed part of the NSIP itself, and what was not part of the NSIP and therefore could not be included in the application, should be avoided.

Using an example of a substation, where an application under the PA 2008 had not yet been made, it seems it would be possible for a TCPA application to be made. If this is on the basis, however, that the substation did not form part of a future NSIP, it would be difficult to see how it could then be included within a PA 2008 application on the basis that it did form part of an NSIP.

In relation to NGs proposal to provide a single Environmental Statement for both NSIP and TCPA elements of the scheme, each authority will need to be able to distinguish the environmental information relating to the development for which consent from them is sought, and also the cumulative effects of that development with the other elements, and any other reasonably foreseeable developments, as per our Advice Note 9 regarding the Rochdale Envelope approach: [attachment 1]

06 August 2014
Jaqui Fenn National Grid
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
I would like to voice my opposition to the above project based on:


-its damage to tourism in the area;
-its damage to the ancient site of Plas yn Dinas;
-its damage to the legacy of countryside for future generations.


I cannot see on your website how I become involved in the process so would be grateful for any assistance you can offer.
As you may be aware, the National Grid Mid Wales proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted

National Grid is currently undertaking consultation on this proposal and will undertake their pre-application statutory consultation under section 42 in due course, prior to the application being submitted.

For more information about the timing of National Grid?s consultation you may wish to contact National Grid directly, through their website on this link: www.nationalgrid.com/uk/Electricity/MajorProjects/midwalesconnection

At this point any responses to consultation on this proposal should go to National Grid and not the Planning Inspectorate to allow National Grid to take account of any points you wish to raise prior to finalising their proposal. I have attached Advice Note 8.2 (below) for your guide to getting involved in pre-application consultation.

Prior to submission of the application, National Grid will publicise how they intend to consult on the preliminary environmental information for this proposal. Once National Grid is ready to submit an application for development consent they will submit an Environmental Statement as part of their application.

I have also attached the Planning Inspectorate Advice Notes 8.2, 8.4 and 8.5 (below) which explain how you can get involved if the application is accepted for examination once submitted.

You may also, for background, wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1) and Electricity Networks (EN 5 produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

22 November 2013
Caroline Johnson
Enquiry received via meeting
response has attachments
Please see attched meeting note

25 October 2013
National Grid
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from Mrs Edna Evans regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

08 April 2013
Edna Evans
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from Marchioness of Linlithgow regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

11 March 2013
The Marchioness of Linlithgow The Marchioness of Linlithgow
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from J D Thomas regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

11 March 2013
J D Thomas
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from Mr & mrs Morris regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

11 March 2013
Mr & Mrs Morris
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from Pete Goolden regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

11 March 2013
Pete Goolden
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from a resident of Lower Maen, Meifod regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

11 March 2013
Resident of Lower Maen Meifod
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from F.A Morris regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

08 March 2013
F.A Morris
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from Mr & Mrs Thomas regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website

08 March 2013
Mr & Mrs Thomas
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from J.E Ashton (Trederwen Caravan Park) regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

08 March 2013
J.E Ashton Trederwen Caravan Park
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from A. Jones regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

08 March 2013
A Jones
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from Humphrey Davies regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

08 March 2013
Humphrey Davies
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from P.E Hearn regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

08 March 2013
P.E Hern
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from Glyn L & M.E Jones regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

08 March 2013
Glyn L & M.E Jones
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from G.E Stephens regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

08 March 2013
G.E Stephens
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from Gordon and Patricia Evans regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

08 March 2013
Gordon & Patricia Evans
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from Rob Williamsregarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

08 March 2013
Rob Williams
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry received from J.N Lloyd regarding access to land for National Grid's proposed Mid Wales electric line connection project.
As you may be aware, the above proposal is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) ?PA 2008? process; therefore an application has not yet been formally submitted.

National Grid is currently undertaking their early non-statutory consultation and will undertake their statutory section 42 consultation in due course prior to the application being submitted. For more information about the timing of this consultation please contact National Grid directly.

I can confirm that to date, we have not received an application from National Grid under section 53 of the PA 2008 regarding rights of entry. I have enclosed the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes regarding section 53 and also section 52, which relates to applicants obtaining information about interests in land. Whilst not a requirement of either section 53 or 52 of the PA 2008, the Planning Inspectorate expects applicants submitting an authorisation request under either of these provisions to notify any landowners and/or proposed recipients who may be affected by the request that such a request has been made and to inform them that they have 21 days to provide any comments they wish to make on the authorisation request to the Planning Inspectorate. Please note that the Planning Inspectorate will assume that the identified owners and/or proposed recipients do not have any comments to make on the request if the Inspectorate has not received any comments from them by the date specified in the applicant?s notification letter.

You may also wish to view the National Policy Statements for Overarching Energy (EN-1), Electricity Networks (EN-5) and Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3) produced by the Department for Energy and Climate Change. National Policy Statements are government policies which are the primary policy consideration for decision makers when dealing with different types of nationally significant infrastructure projects. The above National Policy Statements are available on the Department for Energy and Climate Change website.

08 March 2013
J.N Lloyd
Enquiry received via post
The Planning Inspectorate received a letter from a resident of Meifod regarding wind farms and the National Grid electirc line proposal in Mid Wales.
The Planning Inspectorate gave the following advice on the proposed Wind Farm and Electricity Connection in Mid Wales

I understand that your letter relates to a wind farm and also the proposed construction of a new 400kV electricity line connection by National Grid between Shropshire and Powys. It would be helpful to us if you could include the name of the project(s) to which you are referring to in your correspondence, this will ensure that we are providing you with the correct information.

We appreciate being informed about issues in relation to nationally significant infrastructure projects; however prior to the submission of an application (at the pre-application stage) any concerns or questions you have about a specific project should be raised directly with the relevant applicant. Responding to the applicant?s pre-application consultation is the best approach to influence a project and express your views at an early stage.

Once an application is submitted and if it is accepted to proceed to examination, there will be an opportunity to register with the Planning Inspectorate to have your say.

In response to your question regarding whether the Planning Inspectorate walked through the area, I can confirm that the internal project team attended a site visit last year regarding the National Grid and Scottish Power Energy Networks electric line proposals.

30 November 2012
Resident of Meifod Resident of Meifod
Enquiry received via meeting
response has attachments
Project update meeting for the proposed Mid Wales Electricity connection project EN020010
Please see attached meeting note

25 October 2012
National Grid
Enquiry received via post
Letter from a Professor Wilkinson raising concerns about the proposed Mid Wales Electricity Connection (NG) and wind farm proposals.
Thank you for your letter received on the 4 October 2012 and apologise for the delay in our response.

We appreciate being kept informed about nationally significant infrastructure projects as it useful for us to monitor emerging issues at the pre-application stage. You may be aware however that the Planning Inspectorate can only accept this letter for information purposes at this stage.

I understand that your letter relates to wind farm proposals in Mid Wales as well as National Grid?s proposed 400kv electric line connection from Powys to Shropshire. The three wind farm proposals at Llanbrynmair, Llandinam and Llaithddu, which you have mentioned in your letter, are not considered under the Planning Act 2008 process (as amended), however National Grid?s proposal is.
National Grid?s proposed 400kV line project is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 process,and therefore the application has not yet been formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate. I have attached Advice Note 8.1, 8.2, and 8.3 for more information about the stages of the process. During the pre-application stage, the applicant is your first point of contact until the application is formally submitted. I would therefore encourage you to ensure that National Grid is aware of the contents of your letter. Responding to the applicant?s pre-application consultation is the best approach to influence a proposal, whether you agree or disagree with the proposal or believe it could be improved.

If you wish to make comments to National Grid at this current stage in the process you can telephone the free phone number 0800 0195325 to request a comment form which can be referred to the Freepost address: FREEPOST NATIONAL GRID MID W CONNECTION. You can also contact the applicant by email on: [email protected] .

Once the application has been formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate and if it is accepted for examination, you will have the opportunity to register as an interested party and as a result, take part in the examination.

To find out more about the nationally significant infrastructure projects proposed in Wales under the Planning Act 2008 regime, you can visit our website which can be accessed on this web address: www.planningportal.gov.uk/infrastructure.

I have noted that your letter also refers to the other possibilities for the generation of electricity in Wales. You may wish to contact your Local Authority on this matter.

You may find it useful to view the Department for Energy and Climate (DECC) website for National Policy Statements EN-1 (Overarching Energy), EN-3 (Renewable Energy) and EN-5 (Electricity Networks) which sets out the governments objectives for the development of nationally significant energy infrastructure.

23 October 2012
William Wilkinson
Enquiry received via post
Proposed Electricity connection concerns for Mid Wales (NG)

Letter received regarding alternative suggestions for sustainable development for electricity connection.
Thank you for your letter received on the 4 October 2012 regarding the above proposal. I apologise for the delay in our response.

We appreciate being kept informed about nationally significant infrastructure projects as it is useful for us to monitor emerging issues at the pre-application stage. You may be aware however that the Planning Inspectorate can only accept this letter for information purposes at this stage.

National Grid?s proposed 400kV line project is currently at the pre-application stage of the Planning Act 2008 process, therefore the application has not yet been formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate. I have attached Advice Note 8.1, 8.2, and 8.3 for more information about the stages of the process.

During the pre-application stage, the applicant is your first point of contact until the application is formally submitted. I would therefore encourage you to ensure that National Grid is aware of the contents of your letter. Furthermore, responding to the applicant?s pre-application consultation is the best approach to influence a proposal, whether you agree or disagree with the proposal or believe it could be improved.

If you wish to make comments to National Grid at this current stage in the process you can telephone the free phone number 0800 0195325 to request a comment form, returning it to the Freepost address: FREEPOST NATIONAL GRID MID W CONNECTION. You can also contact the applicant by email on: [email protected] .

Once the application has been formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate and if it is accepted for examination, you will have the opportunity to register as an interested party and as a result, take part in the examination.

To find out more about the nationally significant infrastructure projects proposed in Wales under the Planning Act 2008 regime, you can visit our website which can be accessed on this web address: www.planningportal.gov.uk/infrastructure.

I have noted that your letter also refers to the other possibilities for the generation of electricity in Wales. You may wish to contact your local authority who may be able to assist you with more advice on comparative assessment of the options and you may also find it useful to view the Department for Energy and Climate (DECC) website for National Policy Statements EN-1 (Overarching Energy), EN-3 (Renewable Energy) and EN-5 (Electricity Networks) which set out the governments objectives for the development of nationally significant energy infrastructure.

23 October 2012
STEP - G Wilkinson
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry with regard to new preferred route for Mid Wales Electricity Connection by National Grid and its potential impacts on health, property values, destruction of the wildlife and natural beauty.
In your letter to the Planning Inspectorate received on 5 October 2012 I understand that your concerns are with regard to the National Grid?s proposed preferred route for the electricity connection in Powys.

As you might be aware the proposed application for Mid Wales Electricity Connection is currently at the pre-application stage of the process and has not yet been formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate. The anticipated date for the submission is likely to be the Q4 of 2013.

During the pre-application stage the applicant (National Grid) is your first point of contact until the application is formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate. Responding to the applicant?s pre-application consultation is the best approach to influence a project, whether you agree with it, disagree with it, or believe it could be improved. I would therefore encourage you to inform National Grid about your concerns.

Once the application been formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate and if it is accepted for examination, you will be able to register as an interested party. Registration will give you an opportunity to express your views and make a brief summary of what you agree or disagree with in the application and what you consider the main issues to be and their impact, by submitting a relevant representation directly to the Planning Inspectorate.

To inform National Grid about your concerns you can request a copy of the comment form by contacting the applicant on 0800 019 5325 and send the form back using the freepost address below:

FREEPOST NATIONAL GRID MID W CONNECTION

I am also enclosing some of the Planning Inspectorate?s Advice Notes in relation to how the process works and how to get involved once the application been formally submitted.

I hope you find this information to be helpful.

19 October 2012
Michaela Huish
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
At the meeting of Llanfyllin Town Council this week, I was asked to write to you, to voice stronge objections to the preffered route, now being considered by National Grid, to provide a connection for new wind farms in Mid Wales.

In representing the many concerns of this community, Llanfyllin Town Council ask that you, in your role as National Planning Inspectorate, do all in your power to stop the destruction of our countryside.
We appreciate being kept informed by stakeholders about Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects. Your letter is useful for us to monitor emerging issues in response to a pre-application proposal. As you will be aware, however, the Planning Inspectorate can accept this letter for information purposes only at this stage.

The application for the Mid Wales Connection (National Grid) proposal is likely to be submitted to the Planning Inspectorate in Q4 of 2013.

The proposed overhead electric line project is currently in the 'pre-application' stage of our process and therefore the application has not yet been formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate. Before submitting an application, applicants are required to carry out extensive consultation on the proposed development (section 42 and section 47 of the Planning Act 2008 as amended).

During the pre-application stage the applicant is your first point of contact until the application is formally submitted. Responding to the applicant?s pre-application consultation is the best approach to influence a project, whether you agree with it, disagree with it, or believe it could be improved. I would therefore encourage you as a local authority to ensue that National Grid is aware of concerns that arose during your meeting with local community.

Once the application has been formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate on behalf of the Secretary of State has 28 days to decide whether to ?accept? the application to proceed to examination. Part of this assessment will consider whether the applicant has adequately complied with their duty to have taken account of any relevant responses received from persons they are required to consult under s42, 44 and 47 of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended), which includes certain local authorities and statutory bodies, persons with interests in the land and members of the public.

If the application is accepted the applicant is required to publicise this decision and also notify certain bodies of this decision. This notice and publicity will include information on when to make a relevant representation can be made.

The purpose of the relevant representation is also to make a brief summary of what you agree/or disagree with in the application and what you consider the main issues to be and their impact. Interested parties will be able to take a part in the examination of the application including attending the Preliminary Meeting and hearings and detailed written representation can be submitted later on in the process.

Please view the following Advice Notes for more information:

8.1 How the process works

[attachment 1]

8.2 Responding to the developer?s pre-application consultation

[attachment 2]

8.3 How to register and become an interested party in an application

[attachment 3]

8.4 Influencing how application will be examined ? the Preliminary Meeting

[attachment 4]

03 October 2012
Cyngor Tref Llanfyllin Town Coun - Angela Vause
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
I write with regret to voice my opinion at the proposed destruction to the beautiful countryside in Vyrnwy Valleyand surrounding area. We have been residents for 40 years in this wonderful part of the countryside which will be completely destroyed if the route for the wind turbines and pylons are allowed to go ahead.

The amount of energy produced by wind in the UK is minimal and costs and destruction will not come close to ever making this a viable project, the are far better more efficient ways to create renewable energy, with less cost, less destruction to countryside of most importantly no impact on HEALTH.

We have farming and tourism as the main income for the lively hood of residents this will be totally wiped out.

The road network is by no way sufficient to support the traffic that this project will generate; this disruption we all will encounter is unthinkable.

The route does not meet the requirement of the 'Holdford Rules'.

Please please consider these very important reasons in which the wind farms should not go ahead.
I understand that issues raised in your letter refer to the wind farm project as well as an electric line connection. The Planning Inspectorate is also currently aware of three wind farm proposals in Powys that would be determined under the same process. All three wind farm applications are currently at the pre-application stage of the process and the developer is your first point of contact at this stage. It would be useful therefore to specify which application exactly you refer to as we could then provide you with more information about the project and the applicant.

Please note that the National Grid (developer) proposal is for construction of a new 400 kV electricity connection between Shropshire and Powys. This application is currently in the 'pre-application' stage of our process and therefore the application has not yet been formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate.

During the pre-application stage, as mentioned above the applicant is your first point of contact until the application is formally submitted. Responding to the developer?s pre-application consultation is the best approach to influence a project, whether you agree with it, disagree with it, or believe it could be improved. I would therefore encourage you to ensure that developer of the application you refer to is aware of the contents of your letter.

Once the application is submitted and if it is accepted to proceed to examination, there will be an opportunity for people to register with the Planning Inspectorate to have their say. By registering at the appropriate time you will then be asked to outline your comments to the appointed Examining Authority.

If you wish to find out more about projects located in Wales and developers contact details, please check our website on the following link:
[attachment 1]

I have also included a link to our advice notes that set out the process by which proposals (under the Planning Act 2008) would be determined; in particular Advice Notes 8.1 ? 8.5 outline how the process works and the opportunities to be involved:

[attachment 2]

28 September 2012
E.A. Gittins
Enquiry received via post
Letter received from B Walton regarding National Grid's announcement of the preferred substation location and route corridor.
The Planning Inspectorate provided the following advice and advice notes 8.1 and 8.2 were enclosed with the response:

I note that you are aware of National Grid?s recent announcement regarding the proposed substation siting area and the preferred electric line route corridor from Cefn Coch, via Llansantffraid, to Lower Frankton in Shropshire.

The electric line proposal is currently in the pre-application stage of the process and therefore has not yet been formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate. Until an application is formally submitted, the developer is your first point of contact for any comments you have on the proposal. Responding to the developer?s pre-application consultation is the best approach to influence a project, whether you agree with it, disagree with it, or believe it could be improved. I would therefore encourage you to make any comments you have to National Grid (the developer). Please note that the substation aspect of the scheme will not be considered by the Planning Inspectorate, due to devolution in Wales, but is likely to be determined by the local authority.

Before formally consulting people living in the vicinity of the electric line project, the developer will prepare a Statement of Community Consultation (SOCC), having first consulted relevant local authorities about what it should contain. The SOCC will detail the consultation the developer intends to undertake with the local community about their project. The developer is then required to carry out their consultation with the local community as set out in the SOCC. To confirm, the developer has yet to undertake formal SOCC consultation for the electric line proposal, however as you may be aware they have already undertaken some consultation on this scheme.

Once the electric line application is submitted and if it is accepted to proceed to examination, there will be an opportunity for people to register with the Planning Inspectorate to have their say. By registering at the appropriate time you will then be asked to outline your comments to the Examining Authority.

The Planning Inspectorate is currently aware of three wind farm proposals in Powys that would be determined under the same process. Again at the pre-application stage of the process the developer is your first point of contact.

23 August 2012
B Walton
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Email from Mrs CJ Barrett regarding National Grid's preferred substation location and route corridor including comments on proposed wind farms and pylons in Mid Wales.
The Planning Inspectorate provided the following advice:

I understand that you have heard on the news that the National Grid Mid Wales connection proposal has identified Cefn Coch in Powys as the preferred substation siting area, and the preferred route corridor for the electric line is proposed through your village.

The electric line proposal is currently in the pre-application stage of the process and therefore has not yet been formally submitted to the Planning Inspectorate. Until an application is formally submitted, the developer is your first point of contact for any comments you have on the proposal. Responding to the developer?s pre-application consultation is the best approach to influence a project, whether you agree with it, disagree with it, or believe it could be improved. I would therefore encourage you to ensure that National Grid (the developer) is aware of the contents of your letter. Please note that the substation aspect of the scheme will not be considered by the Planning Inspectorate, due to devolution in Wales, but is likely to be determined by the local authority.

Before formally consulting people living in the vicinity of the electric line project, the developer will prepare a Statement of Community Consultation (SOCC), having first consulted relevant local authorities about what it should contain. The SOCC will detail the consultation the developer intends to undertake with the local community about their project. The developer is then required to carry out their consultation with the local community as set out in the SOCC. To confirm, the developer has yet to undertake formal SOCC consultation for the electric line proposal, however as you may be aware they have already undertaken some consultation on this scheme.

Once the electric line application is submitted and if it is accepted to proceed to examination, there will be an opportunity for people to register with the Planning Inspectorate to have their say. By registering at the appropriate time you will then be asked to outline your comments to the Examining Authority.

You may be aware that the electric line proposal is identified under the project name of Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid) on our website on the following link, you will also find the developers contact details on this webpage:
[attachment 1]
[attachment 2]

The Planning Inspectorate is currently aware of three wind farm proposals in Powys that would be determined under the same process. Again at the pre-application stage of the process the developer is your first point of contact.

I have included a link to our advice notes that set out the process by which proposals (under the Planning Act 2008) would be determined; in particular Advice Notes 8.1 - 8.5 outline how the process works and the opportunities to be involved: [attachment 3] You have also asked if the Planning Inspectorate can support your community against this and similar proposed developments. This is a strictly neutral body and cannot hold an opinion on either side of such a debate.

22 August 2012
CJ Barrett
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
National Grid, intend to produce the following documents to evidence the first round of public consultation as follows:


Raw data report

Analysis Report

Feedback Report



The above documents will inform the Statement of Preferred Option and will feed into the final Consultation Report.



Our question is around the Raw Data Report and the Analysis Report.



Following the recent advice note issued by the IPC (Compiling the Consultation Report October 2011) we have had a debate as to how best to collate data in both the above documents. Currently these are split into two sections ? the first being stakeholder ? which includes both those described in the statute and other stakeholders. The second section is public.



We have discussed the guidance and feel it may be helpful to further split the first of these sections down into subsections as follows:



OPTION 1



Prescribed consultees (S.42)



National/regional/local bodies

Local Authorities (S43)

Emergency Services

Governmental

Non departmental public bodies

Parish, community and Town Councils

Statutory Undertakers



Local community (S.47)



Project specific local interest groups

Other national/regional/local bodies



This will allow more granularity in the Raw Data Report and Analysis Report ? rather than just grouping all stakeholders together.



However there is a thought that if we are sub dividing in this way we could take this further and sub divide even further as follows:



OPTION 2



Prescribed consultees:



National/regional/local bodies

Local Authorities (S43)

Emergency Services

Governmental

Non departmental public bodies

Parish, community and Town Councils

Statutory Undertakers



Other consultees:



The local community (project specific/local interest groups)

Business

Heritage groups

Access groups

Non statutory environmental groups

Academic

Crown

People living in the vicinity of the land.




We have some concerns about the second approach. At this stage of the consultation we have very few response in some of these categories and therefore to sub divide so widely will in effect mean that the summary report in effect becomes another list of consultation responses (which is the function of the raw data report). It may be that this approach is more useful in the next round of consultation when we would expect to see much more detailed responses from some of these groups and hopefully responses from a much more varied range of consultees.



We feel that further sub-categorisation provides no benefits in the Raw Data Report as all responses are fully set out and the grouping outlined in Option 1 above provides sufficient flexibility.



We are keen to retain the difference between the Raw Data Report and the summary Report and are slightly concerned that categorisation over and above Option 1 will mean that the tow documents become very similar.
Whilst the IPC is unable to provide definitive advice on the way in which applicants structure their consultation data in reports over and above that contained in Advice Note 14: Compiling the Consultation Report, I hope that the following points are helpful:

Splitting the consultation respondents in to sections that relate to the 2008 Planning Act seems logical. I have made the assumption that this is all informal consultation and therefore advise that you make this clear that you have not to date been consulting in line with the sections in the Planning Act 2008 (PA 2008) but rather using the categories as guidance, choosing your group titles accordingly. For example you should avoid referring to 's47 consultation' unless it is actually undertaken in accordance with the PA 2008. As such your Consultation Report must be absolutely clear what the status was of the phase one consultation undertaken last year, e.g. informal consultation with the local community.

I would encourage that you look at the s.55 checklist which the IPC publishes with accepted applications. This form will not only provide comments that we have made on previous Consultation Reports but will also provide an insight into what the IPC looks for and the order in which our checks are carried out. It will indicate perhaps, how you might categorise the respondents in to groups. Please note that the s.55 checklist may well change between now and your submission date and therefore you may which to address these changes as they arise.

Hinkley New Nuclear Power Station C has been accepted for examination. Whilst the Consultation Report should not necessarily be seen as best practice, you may find it helpful as an example of a Consultation Report addressing a large number of responses. It is available on our website at : [attachment 1]

As the Local Authorities will be invited to read the Consultation Report and provide their views to the IPC as to the adequacy of your consultation, we would encourage you to speak with them about how data is presented.

The main aim is to enable the report to be logical and accessible. If you feel that 'Option 1' is the best way to achieve this aim in reporting on the consultation at this stage then we cannot see a problem with this approach.

16 January 2012
National Grid - Jacqui Fenn
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
If necessary I wish to register MPC as an interested body in the pylons project possibly through Montford Parish.
We have already commented on the initial part of the process and I now wonder if I need to register MPC as an "interested body" ??
Please would you send me very clear and simple instructions telling me if I need to register MPC in this way and if so when and how I can do it.
Would our separate Montford Against Pylons residents group also need to register as an interested party
Please see attachment.

16 November 2011
Montford Parish Council - Ian Hutchinson
Enquiry received via phone
When can we submit a relevant representation?
What is a SoCC?
The period for submitting relevant representations has not yet opened. Only once an application has been submitted and accepted to go forward to examination will members of the public and organisations be able to register as an interested party. It was mentioned that Parish Councils relevant to the project are statutory consultees who will be notified by the applicant if the application is accepted by the IPC.

A developer must prepare a Statement of Community Consultation (SoCC), setting out their methodology for consulting with the local community. The developer has a duty to consult with the local authority in which the proposal is situated about the content of the SoCC before publishing the SoCC in a local newspaper.

18 October 2011
on behalf of a parish council - McSporran
Enquiry received via phone
Please can you supply details of the registration procedure for a project like the Mid-Wales Connection?

I would also like further information on the following areas: Can local amenity groups register their interest in the scheme? What is Section 42 consultation? What are s106 agreements?
The Mid-Wales Electricity Connection scheme is currently at pre-application stage. At the pre-application stage developers have a statutory duty to consult the public and prescribed consultees about their proposals under the Planning Act 2008 (PA 2008).

Part of this process is section 42 of the PA 2008, which is a duty to consult statutory consultees, local authorities and those with a legal interest in the land on the scheme before its submission to the IPC. Statutory consultees, which can include some parish councils, are prescribed under Schedule 1 of The Infrastructure Planning (Applications: Prescribed Forms and Procedure) Regulations 2009.

Other relevant sections of the PA 2008 to the pre-application consultation are section 47 (duty to consult local community) and section 48 (duty to publicise).

After the pre-application stage, if the IPC 1Details about how and when to register will be publicised by the developer in local newspapers and via site notices. The IPC will also offer details about how to register and other project information on our website.

Making a relevant representation will also allow a person or organisation to participate in the examination and receive copies of our correspondence as an interested party. Statutory consultees are automatically defined as interested parties under section 102 of the 2008 PA.

Finally, s106 agreements are legal planning agreements made between parties that can, for example, be made in connection with a Development Consent Order (DCO) allowing a particular scheme.

Further information on the application process for nationally significant infrastructure projects can be found in our advice notes, which are available from our website.

18 October 2011
Montford Parish Council - Malcolm McSporran
Enquiry received via meeting
response has attachments
Meeting between the IPC and Shropshire Council elected members.
Please see the attached meeting note.

07 July 2011
Shropshire Council - Ian Kilby
Enquiry received via post
Mr Lewis enquired about the consultation undertaken by National Grid on the Mid Wales Electricity Connections Project.
It is helpful for the Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to the developer of the project and your Local Authority as the latter will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the developer as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure

05 July 2011
Peter Lewis
Enquiry received via post
Mrs Stamps enquired consultation undertaken by National Grid on the Mid Wales Electricity Connections Project.
It is helpful for the Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to the developer of the project and your Local Authority as the latter will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the developer as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure

05 July 2011
Tina Stamps
Enquiry received via email
Mr Swaine sent an email to the IPC enquiring as to whether the IPC will consider the effects that each application (National Grid and SPEN) will have on mid Wales, including cumulative effects.
Before making an application for a development consent order (DCO), the developer must first decide whether the proposal is development requiring the production of an Environmental Statement (ES). If the proposal requires an ES, the applicant has the opportunity to ask the IPC for their formal opinion on the information to be included in the ES ? a ?scoping opinion?.

If a scoping opinion is requested, the IPC will issue an opinion which will include comments on the developer?s approach to identifying and assessing cumulative impacts.

In Wales, associated development or development not integral to the NSIP cannot be consented by the IPC as part of the DCO, although any cumulative or indirect effects would still need to be assessed as part of the environmental impact assessment (EIA).

The IPC expects an ES for a NSIP to describe the baseline situation and the proposed NSIP development within the context of the site and any other proposals in the vicinity. Other major development in the area would also be identified beyond the proposal itself including any associated development. The IPC recommends that other development should be identified through consultation with the local planning authorities in the area on the basis of major developments that are:

built and operational;
under construction;
permitted application(s), but not yet implemented;
submitted application(s) not yet determined;
identified on the IPC?s Programme of Projects;
identified in the relevant Development Plan (and emerging Development Plans - with appropriate weight being given as they move closer to adoption) recognising that much information on any relevant proposals will be limited; and
identified in other policy documents, (for example in Wales the Technical Advice Notes which establish strategic search areas) as development reasonably likely to come forward.

Details would be provided in the ES, including the types of development, location and key aspects that may affect the EIA and have been taken into account as part of the assessment.

29 June 2011
Gary Swaine
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Owen sent a letter to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project, the issue raised was the impact on health.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008 (PA 2008). During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to publicise the proposed application and consult with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and with other statutory consultees, and have regard to any relevant responses to that publicity and consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the proposed projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) is able to provide advice about applying for an order granting development consent, or making a representations about an application or proposed application (under s.51 of the PA2008. We are under s.51 unable to provide advice on the merits of an application or proposed application. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the PA2008. This log is published on our website [attachment 1]. We are though happy to be copied in on any comments you might wish to make to the developer(s), it is also not appropriate for us to comment on national policy since these are matters for Central Government.

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that those queries in your email that specifically relate to these projects are raised directly with the developer(s) of the Mid Wales Connection projects as appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected] There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local Council(s) also play a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the Council(s) any comments you send to the developer(s) at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in IPC Advice Note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once a developer is satisfied that its pre-application consultation, publicity and other relevant duties are complete, they may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC then has 28 days in which to decide whether or not to accept the application. If accepted, the application would then proceed to the examination stage. The IPC's decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation and publicity has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation and publicity has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:
? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have had regard to the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State under s.50 of the PA2008.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published by the IPC providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the infrastructure planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on, amongst other matters, how to register as an 'interested party' and make relevant and written representations. This can be found at:
[attachment 4].

28 June 2011
Wyn Owen
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Ms Burgess sent a letter to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project, the issue raised in the letter was the impact on health.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008 (PA 2008). During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to publicise the proposed application and consult with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and with other statutory consultees, and have regard to any relevant responses to that publicity and consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the proposed projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) is able to provide advice about applying for an order granting development consent, or making a representations about an application or proposed application (under s.51 of the PA2008. We are under s.51 unable to provide advice on the merits of an application or proposed application. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the PA2008. This log is published on our website [attachment 1]. We are though happy to be copied in on any comments you might wish to make to the developer(s), it is also not appropriate for us to comment on national policy since these are matters for Central Government.

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that those queries in your email that specifically relate to these projects are raised directly with the developer(s) of the Mid Wales Connection projects as appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected] There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local Council(s) also play a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the Council(s) any comments you send to the developer(s) at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in IPC Advice Note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once a developer is satisfied that its pre-application consultation, publicity and other relevant duties are complete, they may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC then has 28 days in which to decide whether or not to accept the application. If accepted, the application would then proceed to the examination stage. The IPC's decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation and publicity has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation and publicity has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:
? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have had regard to the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State under s.50 of the PA2008.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published by the IPC providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the infrastructure planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on, amongst other matters, how to register as an 'interested party' and make relevant and written representations. This can be found at:
[attachment 4].

28 June 2011
Carole Burgess
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Ms Wilcox enquired about the consultation conducted by National Grid on the Mid Wales Connections Project.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008 (PA 2008). During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to publicise the proposed application and consult with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and with other statutory consultees, and have regard to any relevant responses to that publicity and consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the proposed projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) is able to provide advice about applying for an order granting development consent, or making a representations about an application or proposed application (under s.51 of the PA2008. We are under s.51 unable to provide advice on the merits of an application or proposed application. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the PA2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]. We are though happy to be copied in on any comments you might wish to make to the developer(s), it is also not appropriate for us to comment on national policy since these are matters for Central Government.



With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that those queries in your email that specifically relate to these projects are raised directly with the developer(s) of the Mid Wales Connection projects as appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]

There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info



Your local Council(s) also play a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the Council(s) any comments you send to the developer(s) at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in IPC Advice Note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].



Once a developer is satisfied that its pre-application consultation, publicity and other relevant duties are complete, they may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC then has 28 days in which to decide whether or not to accept the application. If accepted, the application would then proceed to the examination stage. The IPC's decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation and publicity has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation and publicity has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:



· National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;

· Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and

· The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have had regard to the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State under s.50 of the PA2008.



If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published by the IPC providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the infrastructure planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on, amongst other matters, how to register as an 'interested party' and make relevant and written representations. This can be found at:

[attachment 3].



As mentioned above, the IPC is unable to provide advice on the merits of a proposed application and it is not appropriate for us to comment on national policy. Since the draft declaration attached to your email concerns matters that go to the merits of this proposed application and/or relate to relevant national policy we cannot advise/ comment on or sign this document. The comments made in your email are though noted.

Emerging national policy in relation to the 2008 Act regime is set out in the relevant National Policy Statements (NPSs), all of which are currently in draft form. The relevant draft NPSs with regard to this proposed application are EN-1 Overarching Energy and EN-5 Electricity Networks. These draft NPSs set out relevant emerging Government policy on a wide range of impacts, and other matters, relating to such proposed projects, including possible health impacts.

These documents can be found at:-

[attachment 5].

You may therefore wish to raise any concerns you have in relation to these documents with the relevant Government department, in this case the Department for Energy and Climate Change.

22 June 2011
Natasha Wilcock
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
The individuals listed above sent letters to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project (National Grid & SPEN). The concerns raised included consultation, visual impact and health impacts.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]
There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:
[attachment 3].

21 June 2011
D Bebb, K Bebb, Mrs B J Bebb, V Bebb, B Bebb & G Bebb
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
C F Mountford sent a letter to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised included health impacts, visual impacts and tourism.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008 (PA 2008). During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to publicise the proposed application and consult with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and with other statutory consultees, and have regard to any relevant responses to that publicity and consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the proposed projects.
The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) is able to provide advice about applying for an order granting development consent, or making a representations about an application or proposed application (under s.51 of the PA2008. We are under s.51 unable to provide advice on the merits of an application or proposed application. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the PA2008. This log is published on our website [attachment 1]. We are though happy to be copied in on any comments you might wish to make to the developer(s), it is also not appropriate for us to comment on national policy since these are matters for Central Government.

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that those queries in your email that specifically relate to these projects are raised directly with the developer(s) of the Mid Wales Connection projects as appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]
There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local Council(s) also play a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the Council(s) any comments you send to the developer(s) at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in IPC Advice Note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once a developer is satisfied that its pre-application consultation, publicity and other relevant duties are complete, they may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC then has 28 days in which to decide whether or not to accept the application. If accepted, the application would then proceed to the examination stage. The IPC's decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation and publicity has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation and publicity has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have had regard to the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State under s.50 of the PA2008.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published by the IPC providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the infrastructure planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on, amongst other matters, how to register as an 'interested party' and make relevant and written representations. This can be found at:
[attachment 4].

21 June 2011
C F Mountford
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
MS Murray enquired about the consultation conducted by National Grid on the Mid Wales Connections Project.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the project or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects is appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website;

[attachment 2].

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at:

[attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:

· National Grid consultation report;

· Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and

· The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:

[attachment 3].

21 June 2011
June Murray
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Ms Justice enquired about the consultation conducted by National Grid on the Mid Wales Connections Project.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the project or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects is appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected]

There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]

There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:

· National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;

· Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and

· The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:

[attachment 3].

21 June 2011
Deb Justice
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Ms Mountford sent a letter to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised included health impacts, TAN 8 and visual impacts.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008 (PA 2008). During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to publicise the proposed application and consult with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and with other statutory consultees, and have regard to any relevant responses to that publicity and consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the proposed projects.
The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) is able to provide advice about applying for an order granting development consent, or making a representations about an application or proposed application (under s.51 of the PA2008. We are under s.51 unable to provide advice on the merits of an application or proposed application. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the PA2008. This log is published on our website [attachment 1]. We are though happy to be copied in on any comments you might wish to make to the developer(s), it is also not appropriate for us to comment on national policy since these are matters for Central Government.

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that those queries in your email that specifically relate to these projects are raised directly with the developer(s) of the Mid Wales Connection projects as appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]
There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local Council(s) also play a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the Council(s) any comments you send to the developer(s) at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in IPC Advice Note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once a developer is satisfied that its pre-application consultation, publicity and other relevant duties are complete, they may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC then has 28 days in which to decide whether or not to accept the application. If accepted, the application would then proceed to the examination stage. The IPC's decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation and publicity has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation and publicity has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have had regard to the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State under s.50 of the PA2008.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published by the IPC providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the infrastructure planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on, amongst other matters, how to register as an 'interested party' and make relevant and written representations. This can be found at:
[attachment 4].

21 June 2011
Gaynor Mountford
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
The individuals listed above sent letters to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricty Connection Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised in these letters included consultation, Welsh Assembly Government Policy TAN 8, environmental and visual impacts and traffic congestion.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]
There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:
[attachment 3].

21 June 2011
J Padmore, M Van Lill, S A Bennett and D N Bennett
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
The indivduals listed above sent letters to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project (National Grid and SPEN) The issues raised in these letters included consultation, visual impacts & flooding.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]
There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:
[attachment 3].

21 June 2011
K Mountford, S Mountford, R Evans & Mr and Mrs Birchall
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
The individuals listed above sent letters to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised included consultation, visual impacts, imact on wildlife and flooding.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the project or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developer of the Mid Wales Connection project where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2].

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:

? National Grid?s consultation report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:
[attachment 3].

21 June 2011
J Gunn, H Bennett, M D Lister, C Martin and G & T Fleming
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
The individuals listed above sent letters to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Connection Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised included visual impacts, health imapcts and consultation.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]
There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:
[attachment 3].

21 June 2011
J E Van Lill, C Van Lill & B Van Lill
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
The individuals listed above sent letters to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised included consultation, Welsh Assembly Policy TAN 8, flooding and visual impacts.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2].

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid?s consultation report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid has followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:
[attachment 3].

20 June 2011
B J Jenkins and N J Likeman
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
The individuals listed above sent letters to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised in the letters included consultation, noise pollution, flooding and visual impacts.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]
There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:
[attachment 3].

20 June 2011
P Eveson, J & T Brown and J & G Ellis
Enquiry received via post
The individuals listed above semt letters to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues that were raised included visual impacts, consultation and Welsh Assembly Policy TAN 8.
It is helpful for the Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

20 June 2011
B E Jenkins, S Jones, M N Dyer & C M Dyer & S J Irvin & J P Irvin
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
S A Lewis enquired about the consultation conducted by National Grid on the Mid Wales Connections Project.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.



The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the project or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]



With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects is appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected]

There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]

There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info



Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].



Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:



· National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;

· Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and

· The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.



If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:

[attachment 3].

16 June 2011
S A Lewis
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Mr and Mrs Bullen enquired about the consultation undertaken by National Grid on the Mid Wales Connections Project.
I believe that your letter is in response to consultation on electric lines being undertaken in the Mid Wales and Shropshire by National Grid and Scottish Power Energy Networks (SPEN). The wind farms which are to be connected by these electric lines are at various stages of application through a number of consenting bodies.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) are considering and will have given permission for applications for wind farms over 50MW which were submitted prior to the creation of the Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) in March 2010.
The IPC are responsible for applications for wind farms above 50MW from March 2010.
Powys County Council are responsible for wind farm applications under 50MW.

The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the project or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects is appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]
There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:

National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:
[attachment 3].

16 June 2011
Mr and Mrs Bullen
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
The individuals listed above sent letters to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised in these letters included the consultation undertaken by National Grid, , effect on housing market, flooding, health and visual impacts.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]
There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:
[attachment 3].

16 June 2011
A Pryce and Y Davies
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mrs Davies sent a letter to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid and SPEN). Mrs Davies raised concerns about visual impact, tourism, health risks, traffic, flooding and consultation.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

16 June 2011
Yvonne Davies
Enquiry received via post
Mr and Mrs Ffoulkes Jones sent a letter to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project (National Grid and SPEN). The concerns raised included lack of consultation by National Grid, flooding in the area and visual impacts.
It is helpful for the Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

16 June 2011
Mr and Mrs Ffoulkes Jones
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr and Mrs Ffoulkes-Jones sent a letter of objection to the IPC regarding Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid). Mr and Mrs Ffoulkes-Jones raised questions and comments regarding consultation, alternative options, impacts on landscape, tourism and flooding, access and proximity to military operations.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

16 June 2011
Nick and Christine Ffoulkes-Jones
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mrs Pryce sent a letter to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid and SPEN). Mrs Pryce raised concerns about consultation, impact on tourism, studies which have been carried out are incomplete, misleading information and lack of information.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

16 June 2011
Anna Pryce
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr and Mrs Davies sent a letter of objection to the IPC regarding Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid). Mr and Mrs Davies raised questions and comments regarding consultation, alternative options, impacts on landscape, tourism and flooding, access and proximity to military operations
The IPC responded with the attached letter

16 June 2011
Mr & Mrs Davies
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mrs Cullup-Smith sent a copy of her consultation response to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid). Mrs Cullup-Smith raised concerns regarding consultation, harm to the rural way of life, flooding and visual impact.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

16 June 2011
Sue Cullup-Smith
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Davies sent a letter to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid). Mr Davies raised concerns regarding consultation, proximity to residential areas, health risks and the description of the proposal.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

16 June 2011
Roger Davies
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mrs Crossland sent a copy of Worthen with Shelve Parish Council?s consultation response to the IPC. They raised concerns about not being consulted on the options of the proposal before formal consultation commenced, proximity of the proposal to an ANOB, impacts on tourism and farming, threat on rural schools due to a lack of migration to the area and impacts on the rural quality of life.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

16 June 2011
Worthen with Shelve PC - Sarah Crossland
Enquiry received via post
The individuals listed above sent letters to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised in these letters included consultation undertaken by National Grid, flooding, visual impacts and congestion concerns.
It is helpful for the Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

16 June 2011
R Davies, S Crossland, C Goodridge & Mr & Mrs J Davies
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr and Mrs Goodridge sent a letter to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid). Mr and Mrs Goodridge raised concerns about the format of the consultation feedback form and have asked for it to be amended.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

16 June 2011
Mr & Mrs Goodridge
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Mr Johnson enquired about the need for the Mid Wales Connections Project.
I believe that your letter is in response to consultation on electric lines being undertaken in the Mid Wales and Shropshire by National Grid and Scottish Power Energy Networks (SPEN). The wind farms which are to be connected by these electric lines are at various stages of application through a number of consenting bodies.



The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) are considering and will have given permission for applications for wind farms over 50MW which were submitted prior to the creation of the Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) in March 2010.
The IPC are responsible for applications for wind farms above 50MW from March 2010.
Powys County Council are responsible for wind farm applications under 50MW.


The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.



The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the project or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]



With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects is appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]

There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info



Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].



Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:



· National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;

· Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and

· The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.



If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:

[attachment 3].

16 June 2011
Ian Johnson
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Mrs Evans enquired about the consultation undertaken by National Grid on the Mid Wales Connections Project.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.



The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the project or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]



With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects is appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]

There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info



Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].



Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:



· National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;

· Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and

· The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.



If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:

[attachment 3].

16 June 2011
Jane Evans
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr and Mrs Watt sent a letter of general objection to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid). Mr and Mrs Watt raised concerns about visual impact, consultation and environmental surveys. They also asked questions regarding alternative routes, undergrounding, when Shropshire Council were consulted, flooding, proximity to military activities and health risks.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

16 June 2011
Mr & Mrs Watt
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Ms Townsend wrote to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Connector (N Grid and SPEN) proposal. The issues raised by Ms Townsend include the impacts associated with the development and the adequacy of the consulation process.
IPC responded with the letter attached below.

14 June 2011
Stella Townsend
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr and Mrs Jones wrote to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Connector (N Grid) proposal. The issues raised by Mr and Mrs Jones include the impact of the proposal on the surrounding landscape, the need for energy infrastructure and the impact on traffic and congestion on the local road network.
IPC responded with the letter attched below.

14 June 2011
David Jones
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Hill wrote to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Connector (Ngrid and SPEN) proposal. The issues raised by Mr Hill include the lack of consideration of alternatives, environmental impact and the loss of a cultural asset.
IPC responded with the letter attached below.

14 June 2011
Alan Hill
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Dr Bater wrote to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricy Connection (N Grid) proposal. The issues raised by Mr Bater include the consultation process carried out by National Grid, the lack of alternatives put to the public during consultation, the risk of flooding and wider impacts of the proposed development.
IPC responded with the letter attached below.

14 June 2011
Anthony J Bater
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mrs Faulkner wrote to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Connection (N Grid) proposal. The issues raised by Mrs Faulkner include visual impact, noise, congestion, impact on wildlife, flood risk, need for energy infrastructure, environmental impacts and the adequacy of consultation undertaken by National Grid.
IPC responded with the letter attached below.

14 June 2011
Sarah Faulkner
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Fitch wrote to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Connector (N Grid and SPEN) proposal. The issues raised by Mr Fitch include visual impact, environmental impacts, the affect on wildlife, noise, congestion and impacts on house prices.
IPC responded with the letter attached below.

14 June 2011
Alan Fitch
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Bridgland wrote to IPC regarding the Mid Wales Connector (N Grid) proposal. The issues raised by Mr Bridgland include the viual impact, the affect on widlife and the affect on the local road network.
IPC responded with the letter attached below.

14 June 2011
Heather Bridgland
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Harris wrote to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Connector (N Grid and SPEN) proposal. The issues raised by Mr Harris are the visual impact, better alternatives in undergrounding, need for energy infrastructure and potential impacts on traffic and congestion on the local road network.
IPC responded with the letter attached below.

14 June 2011
Paul Harris
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Ms Walford wrote to the IPC regard the Mid Wales Connector (N Grid) proposal. The issues raised by Mrs Walford include visual impacts, affect on wildlife, cultural heritage, congestion, impacts on health and the adequacy of the consultation process.
IPC responded with the letter attached below.

14 June 2011
Jane Walford
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Dalmer wrote to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Connector (N Grid) proposal. The issues raised by Mr Dalmer include the unsuitability of the proposed location, the carbon footprint of the development and the need for this type of development.
IPC responded with the letter attached below.

14 June 2011
Jamie Dalmer
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mrs Davies sent a letter to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid or SPEN). Mrs Davies raised concerns about consultation, scale of the proposal, landscape and visual impact and tourism.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

13 June 2011
Carol Davies
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Llandysilio Community Council sent the IPC a copy of a letter to National Grid and SPEN regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection. They raised concerns regarding consultation, insufficient and incorrect information supplied, flood risk assessment and cumulative impact assessment.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

13 June 2011
Llandysilio Community Council - C E Davies
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mrs Hamlet sent a letter to the IPC regarding Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid) and raised questions regarding consultation, TAN 8 and the relation to Shropshire Council, alternatives (using existing pylons) and impact assessments.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

13 June 2011
Kathleen Hamlet
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Erde sent a copy of his consultation response to National Grid for the Mid Wales Electricity Connection
The IPC responded with the attached

13 June 2011
Bruce Erde
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Bonfield sent the IPC a letter regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid & SPEN). Mr Bonfield raised concerns regarding consultation, traffic, human rights, tourism, impacts on agriculture, flooding and policy.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

13 June 2011
Richard Bonfield
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Weller sent a letter of objection to the IPC regarding Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid and SPEN). Mr Weller's main concerns included consultation, misleading or insufficient information provided, future use and loss of amenity.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

13 June 2011
G C Weller
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Llandrinio Community Council sent a letter to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid). The main concerns raised were regarding consultation undertaken by N Grid and the cumulative impacts of the proposal.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

13 June 2011
Llandrinio Community Council - Chairman to Llandrinio Community Council
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr and Mrs Clarke sent a copy of their consultation response to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid). Mr and Mrs Clarke raised concerns regarding flooding, impacts of site traffic during construction, impacts on tourism, health issues, visual impact, designation of area (AONB), biodiversity, impact on historical sites and human rights
The IPC responded with the attached letter

13 June 2011
John and Jackie Clarke
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr and Mrs Glover sent a letter of objection to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid and SPEN). They raised concerns about flooding, access, environmental studies, proximity to military activities, health impacts, TAN 8, biodiversity, economic impacts and visual impact.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

13 June 2011
David and Christine Glover
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Paterson sent a letter of general objection to the IPC regarding Mid Wales Electricity Connection. Mr Paterson raised concerns regarding landscape and visual impact, impacts on tourism and flooding, proximity to military activities, alternative options such as undergrounding and increased health risk
The IPC responded with the attached letter

13 June 2011
Harry and Roz Edwards
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Introducing the Llansanffraid Action Group Against Pylons and Wind Farms and commenting on the consultation process
Thank you for your email. The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.



The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the project or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]



With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects is appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected]

There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]

There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info



Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].



Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:



· National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;

· Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and

· The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.



If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:

[attachment 3].



I hope that this information is helpful. Please do not hesitate to contact us again with any further queries.

09 June 2011
Llansanffraid Action Group - Digby Davies
Enquiry received via email
I would be grateful if you could confirm the position regarding consultation on the Statement of Community Consultation.
The invitation to local authorities to comment on a developer's draft SoCC is a formal part of the process as set out in the 2008 Planning Act. Section 47 requires that before preparing the SoCC, the developer must consult each relevant local authority about what is to be in the statement. The developer must set a deadline for the local authority's response which is not less than 28 days. The developer must then 'have regard' to any response received from the local authority during that period. I would highlight that the statutory requirement is upon the developer to consult local authorities, and there is no statutory duty upon LAs to respond, although it is of course encouraged.

09 June 2011
Shropshire Council - Ian Kilby
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Allen sent a letter of general objection to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid and SPEN) Projects. Mr Allen's main cocerns were regarding landscape and visual impacts and impacts of construction.
The IPC responded with the attached letter.

09 June 2011
George Allen
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mrs Bonfield sent a letter of general objection to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid). Mrs Bonfield raised concerns regarding the consultation carried out to date, impacts on tourism and the local economy and the impacts of construction.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

09 June 2011
Janice Bonfield
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Davies sent a letter and a copy of his consultation feedback form to the IPC. Mr Davies raised concerns regarding consultation, TAN 8, impact of the development on residential areas/private land and viability of the project.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

09 June 2011
Robert Davies
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Ersser sent a letter of general objection to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (National Grid and SPEN). Mr Ersser's main concerns were regarding the consultations which have taken place and the viability of TAN 8.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

09 June 2011
R L Ersser
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr Powell sent a letter of objection to the IPC regarding Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid). Mr Powell's raised questions and comments regarding consultation, alternative options, impacts on landscape, tourism and flooding, access and proximity to military operations.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

09 June 2011
Peter Powell
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mrs Allen sent a letter of general objection to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid and SPEN) Projects. Mrs Allen's main cocerns were regarding landscape and visual impacts and impacts of construction.
The IPC responded with the attached letter

09 June 2011
Gill Allen
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mrs Ersser sent a letter of general objection to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (National Grid and SPEN). Mrs Ersser's main concerns were regarding the consultations which have taken place and the viability of TAN 8.
The IPC responded with the letter attached

09 June 2011
B A Ersser
Enquiry received via email
Copied the IPC into consultation responses sent to National Grid and Scottish Power Energy Networks
PROPOSED APPLICATION FOR A DEVELOPMENT CONSENT ORDER FOR ELECTRIC LINES BETWEEN POWYS AND SHROPSHIRE



Thank you for your letter and copy of your feedback dated 22nd May 2011 regarding your thoughts on this development. It is helpful for the Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.



At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.



Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can also be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.



If you have any further queries please do not hesitate to contact us or myself on the phone number or email provided

09 June 2011
Kerry Community Council - J Rees
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Just how do I add my voice to the protest against this development have already replied to consultation document is it to early to register with your selves?
Thank you for your email which has been passed to me for response. The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.
The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]
With the above in mind, the approach at this stage of raising your queries with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects is appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected]
There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .
The SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected] There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info
Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:

Developer's consultation reports;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
The extent to which the developer has followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

I hope that this information is helpful. Please do not hesitate to contact us again with any further queries.

06 June 2011
Marion Pearce
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Comments on the two projects and consultation process
See attached letter

03 June 2011
R. E Jerman
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Comments recieved on Tan 8 National policy, consultation being undertaken by National Grid, minutes from public meeting and flooding data
See attached letter

03 June 2011
Kinnerley Parish Council - Kate Sanderson
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Copies of letters sent to National Grid and SPEN regsrding the two projects and consultation
See attached letter

03 June 2011
E Jerman
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Comments on the two projects and the consultation
See attached letter

03 June 2011
Tom Jerman
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mr and Mrs Jerman sent a letter of objection to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connection (N Grid and SPEN). They raised issues concerning visual impact, flooding, biodiversity, historical sites, health risks and consultation.
The IPC responded with the attached letter.

03 June 2011
TE and M Jerman
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Comments on scheme and consultation exercise
See attached letter

03 June 2011
Emma Wall
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Comments on the schemes by National Grid and SPEN
See letter attached

03 June 2011
A.J Evans
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Comments on the projects and consultation process
See attached letter

02 June 2011
Paul Evans
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Comments on the two projects and consultation
See attached letter

02 June 2011
H Jerman
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Mr Geoff Leigh and Mr Gary Swaine enquired about National Grid's consultation regarding the Mid Wales Connections Project
The following reply was sent bo both Mr Leigh and Mr Swaine: The National Grid Mid Wales Connections is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.



The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the project or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]



With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developer of the Mid Wales Connection project where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2].



Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:



· National Grid?s consultation report;

· Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and

· The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.



If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:

[attachment 3].

01 June 2011
Geoff Leigh & Gary Swaine
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
An enquiry was received regarding National Grid and SPEN's consultation in relation to the Mid Wales Connections Projects.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the project or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]
There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:
[attachment 3]

01 June 2011
Joan Morgan
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
The following individuals enquired about the consultation conducted by National Grid on the Mid Wales Connections Project:

Mr D Edwards
Mr K Corran
Mr & Mrs T Taylor
Ms A J Clemett
The following reply was sent to the above individuals:
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the developers of the Mid Wales Connection projects where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]
There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:
[attachment 3]

31 May 2011
Dennis Edwards
Enquiry received via post
Mr Tanner sent the IPC copies of his feedback regarding the consultation being undertaken by National Grid.
It is helpful for the Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant on the address below as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the IPC with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can also be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

31 May 2011
James Tanner
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Comments on the current windfarm and electricity line proposals in Mid Wales and Shropshire
Thank you for your email which has been passed to me for response. The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoters of the Mid Wales Connection schemes where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .
The SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected] There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

Developer's consultation reports;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
The extent to which the developer has followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

I hope that this information is helpful. Please do not hesitate to contact us again with any further queries.

31 May 2011
E Allen
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Mrs Allen sent a letter to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Connections Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised included TAN 8 and the impact on tourism.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoters of the Mid Wales Connection schemes where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .
The SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected] There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

Developer's consultation reports;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
The extent to which the developer has followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

30 May 2011
Eirwen Allen
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mrs Roscoe sent a copy of her National Grid consultation form and a letter outlining her concerns about the Mid Wales Connections Project, to the IPC.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008 (PA 2008). During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to publicise the proposed application and consult with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and with other statutory consultees, and have regard to any relevant responses to that publicity and consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid and SPEN as the developers of the proposed projects.

The Infrastructure Planning Commission's (IPC) is able to provide advice about applying for an order granting development consent, or making a representations about an application or proposed application (under s.51 of the PA2008. We are under s.51 unable to provide advice on the merits of an application or proposed application. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the PA2008. This log is published on our website [attachment 1]. We are though happy to be copied in on any comments you might wish to make to the developer(s), it is also not appropriate for us to comment on national policy since these are matters for Central Government.

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that those queries in your email that specifically relate to these projects are raised directly with the developer(s) of the Mid Wales Connection projects as appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected]
There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local Council(s) also play a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the Council(s) any comments you send to the developer(s) at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in IPC Advice Note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once a developer is satisfied that its pre-application consultation, publicity and other relevant duties are complete, they may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC then has 28 days in which to decide whether or not to accept the application. If accepted, the application would then proceed to the examination stage. The IPC's decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation and publicity has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation and publicity has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid and SPEN have had regard to the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State under s.50 of the PA2008.

If an application is accepted for examination by the IPC, you are able to become involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published by the IPC providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the infrastructure planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on, amongst other matters, how to register as an 'interested party' and make relevant and written representations. This can be found at:
[attachment 4].

30 May 2011
Charlotte Roscoe
Enquiry received via post
The following individuals sent copies of their consultation letters to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Connections Projects:
Mr R Amess
Mrs G Amess
Ms J Harris
Mr L Harris
Ms S Townsend
Mr & Mrs Cooke
The following reply was sent to the above individuals:
It is helpful for the Commission to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can also be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

25 May 2011
William Cooke
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Mr Ward sent an email to the IPC regarding the Mid Wales Connections Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised included TAN 8 and Environmental Assessments.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections schemes are  currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project  in Shropshire.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. 

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 1]

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 2]

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

- National Grid?s consultation report;
- Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
- The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3]
 
With regard to Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), it is likely that the development will require EIA. The EIA Regulations 2009 impose procedural requirements for carrying out EIA on certain NSIP proposals. For example, NSIPs such as nuclear power stations always require EIA. Other NSIPs, such as wind farms, only require EIA if they are likely to have significant effects on the environment by virtue of their nature, size or location.  Schedule 4, Part 1 of the EIA Regulations 2009 requires 'A description of the likely significant effects of the development on the environment, which should cover the direct effects and any indirect, secondary, cumulative, short, medium and longterm, permanent and temporary, positive and negative effects of the development, resulting from:
(a) the existence of the development;
(b) the use of natural resources;
(c) the emission of pollutants, the creation of nuisances and the elimination of waste, and the description by the applicant of the forecasting methods used to assess the effects on the environment. 
The EIA Regulations 2009 can be found at the following address:  http://infrastructure.independent.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/uksi_20092263_en.pdf

The role of the IPC under the EIA Regulations 2009 includes:
- 'Screening? proposals to determine whether they are EIA Developments ; 
- ?Scoping? proposals to advise the applicant what information should be provided within the Environmental Statement (ES) ? this involves seeking views from ?consultation bodies?;  
- Facilitating the preparation of environmental statements by notifying consultation bodies about their duty to provide information and  informing the applicant ;
- Evaluating environmental information in the ES and any representations made about the environmental effects before making a decision;    
- Publicising the IPC?s screening and scoping opinions . 
- Publicising any decision (whether made by the IPC or the Secretary of State) in relation to an application which has been accompanied by an ES. 

Further information on EIA and the IPC can be found at:
[attachment 4]

24 May 2011
David Ward
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry regarding the issues and merits of the Mid Wales Connections Projects.
Thank you for your letter and copy of your feedback received 24th May 2011 which was sent to Charles Hendry MP, regarding your thoughts on this development. It is helpful for the Commission to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can also be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

24 May 2011
Roger Durgan
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Should this development be referred to you I would like the following matters to be taken into account:
1. The alternative routes focus on the Parish of Knockin, and its associated hamlet, Osbaston. National Grid have carried out no consultation apart from a postal questionnaire with the residents of this Parish, who have had to travel to other locations to gain additional information and make their views known. That is inadequate.
2. The Policy which is driving this development is TAN8 of the Welsh Assembly. Residents of this part of Shropshire are directly affected by this policy. We have not been consulted on its adoption, nor do we have any democratic influence through the ballot box or representation on the Welsh Assembly. That is unjust.
3. There appears to have been no requirement or attempt at an Environmental Assessment of the development as a whole ? the wind farms and the associated infrastructure of sub stations and transmission lines. It has been shown that taken together these developments would not satisfy Government policy to achieve a reduction in anthropogenic carbon emissions. Any decision taken in isolation from overall assessment would be flawed, and susceptible to challenge.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections schemes are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project  in Shropshire.
The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. 

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] 
There is also a project website;
[attachment 1]
 Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 2]
 Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

National Grid?s consultation report;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3]
 
With regard to Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), it is likely that the development will require EIA. The EIA Regulations 2009 impose procedural requirements for carrying out EIA on certain NSIP proposals. For example, NSIPs such as nuclear power stations always require EIA. Other NSIPs, such as wind farms, only require EIA if they are likely to have significant effects on the environment by virtue of their nature, size or location.  Schedule 4, Part 1 of the EIA Regulations 2009 requires 'A description of the likely significant effects of the development on the environment, which should cover the direct effects and any indirect, secondary, cumulative, short, medium and longterm, permanent and temporary, positive and negative effects of the development, resulting from:
(a) the existence of the development;
(b) the use of natural resources;
(c) the emission of pollutants, the creation of nuisances and the elimination of waste,
and the description by the applicant of the forecasting methods used to assess the effects on the  environment. 
The EIA Regulations 2009 can be found at the following address:  http://infrastructure.independent.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/uksi_20092263_en.pdf
 The role of the IPC under the EIA Regulations 2009 includes:
?Screening? proposals to determine whether they are EIA Developments ; 
?Scoping? proposals to advise the applicant what information should be provided within the Environmental Statement (ES) ? this involves seeking views from ?consultation bodies?;  
Facilitating the preparation of environmental statements by notifying consultation bodies about their duty to provide information and  informing the applicant ;
Evaluating environmental information in the ES and any representations made about the environmental effects before making a decision;    
Publicising the IPC?s screening and scoping opinions . 
Publicising any decision (whether made by the IPC or the Secretary of State) in relation to an application which has been accompanied by an ES. 
Further information on EIA and the IPC can be found at:
[attachment 4]

24 May 2011
David Ward
Enquiry received via post
Enquiry regarding the Mid Wales Connections Projects with regards to Welsh Assembly Government Policy.
Thank you for your letter and copy of your feedback received 24th May 2011 which was sent to Steve Packer of Powys County Council, regarding your thoughts on this development. It is helpful for the Commission to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can also be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

24 May 2011
Roger Durgan
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Enquiry received regarding the scale of the wind farm development and the infrastructure resulting from this.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoters of the Mid Wales Connection schemes where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .The SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected] There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid?s consultation report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

24 May 2011
P & Mrs J Christodoulou
Enquiry received via post
Mr Beament sent the IPC copies of his consultation feedback regarding the Mid Wales Connections Projects proposed by SPEN and National Grid.
It is helpful for the Commission to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant on the address below as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can also be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

24 May 2011
William Beament
Enquiry received via email
Mr Tulloch sent the IPC a letter regarding the Mid Wales Electricity Connections Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised included TAN 8, visual impacts and health impacts.
It is helpful for the Commission to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can also be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

23 May 2011
Rob Tulloch
Enquiry received via email
I am writing to express my concern & dismay over the proposed plans for wind farm expansion in mid Wales and the associated National Grid Pylon development. I cannot express in strong enough terms my outrage at the WAG proposals for renewable energy such as the aforementioned wind farms. My objections are several and are as follows:

? Large scale wind farm energy production is inefficient, requiring backup resources to provide energy when the wind is not blowing, which on average is 30% of the time.
? The ?carbon footprint? caused by the production of these huge turbines far out ways any potential benefit from producing this so called green / low carbon energy.
? The WAG TAN 8 proposals only make any economic sense to the manufacturers of the turbines & the energy companies that shall run them because of the vast subsidies that they shall get paid by us the UK taxpayer. The inefficiencies of these turbines make them uneconomic in the real world where competing market forces apply.
? The direct impact on the local rural environment will be huge as house prices will be devastated in the immediate vicinity of turbines or pylons and local tourism will be directly affected due to noise and traffic pollution.
? The devastation of our beautiful countryside by 150 foot power pylons is outrageous. Why should huge multinational companies (such as National Grid) who have the skill, capability & knowledge to lay underground cables be allowed to erect over ground pylons. Decisions to do so being made purely on a cost basis. i.e. It is cheaper to put pylons up than to bury them safely under ground.
? The disruption to local people and businesses with respect to increased ?abnormal load? traffic for many years whilst the production of these wind farms takes place will be considerable.
? There is a potential threat to the health of people & livestock due to huge 400KV overhead power cables & pylons.

I am not against wind farming ?per say? but find the whole sale policy that says ?wind farms are the best way to provide alternative energy? despite all the data to the contrary is absolutely ludicrous. I am aware of the need for low carbon, sustainable, renewable energy but trying to put forward that wind farming is the way to attain this requirement is just plain ridiculous.

Please be aware of the feeling of local people when making decisions about future development of such wind farms and associated power infrastructure. A decision made in the cold light of the boardroom or in the Assembly will have long reaching and hard hitting impacts on the people, families and children of Wales for years to come.
Thank you for your letter and copy of your feedback dated 22nd May 2011 regarding your thoughts on this development. It is helpful for the Commission to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can also be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

23 May 2011
Rob Tulloch
Enquiry received via post
The following persons sent copies to the IPC of their feedback correspondence to National Grid and SPEN respectively with regards to the Mid Wales Connections Proposal.

Mrs V A Wildish, Mr J Percival, Ms S Percival, Ms Yvonne Colley and Ms C O'Reilly.

An acknowledgement letter was sent to all of the above.
It is helpful for the Commission to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant on the address below as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can also be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

20 May 2011
V A Wildish, J & S Percival Ms Y Colley, Ms C O'Reilly
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Mr Stone set the IPC a letter concerning the Mid Wales Connections Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issues raised included the impact on tourism, health impacts and TAN 8.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, I have taken a copy and returned your consultation form to enable you to send this on to National Grid. Further queries and comments should be addressed directly with the promoter. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

· National Grid?s consultation report;

· Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and

· The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:

[attachment 4]

19 May 2011
Ron Stone
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Queries regarding the consultation being undertaken by National Grid and SPEN.
The following letter was sent to Tracy Ralph, Derrick Davies, Barbara Wharton and Les Davies:

The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoters of the Mid Wales Connection schemes where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .The SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected] There is also a project website:
www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation reports;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation.
This can be found at:
[attachment 3].

19 May 2011
Tracy Ralph, Derrick Davies Barbara Wharton, Les Davies
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Queries regarding the consultation being undertaken by National Grid and SPEN.
The following letter was sent to Mrs G Friel and Mr Patrick Friel:

The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoters of the Mid Wales Connection schemes where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .The SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected] There is also a project website:
www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid and SPEN?s consultation report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation.
This can be found at:
[attachment 3].

19 May 2011
G Friel, Mr Patrick Friel
Enquiry received via phone
response has attachments
General enquiry regarding the 2008 Planning Act process with particular emphasis on the role of Local Authorities
During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. We are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

· National Grid?s consultation report;

· Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and

· The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:

[attachment 2]


Key documents that may be useful include:

Our Pre-Application Guidance Note provides an overview of the process at Pre-Application stage: [attachment 3]
A copy of the meeting note from our 16th Feb meeting with National Grid regarding the project: [attachment 4]
An extract from the presentation for another project as discussed which focuses on the local authority role (please note we intend to cover this, and your questions, in the forthcoming meeting):


Further information

For background information, 'The IPC: A guide to our role' provides an overview of our process. Page 5 sets out the main roles of local authorities: [attachment 5]
More information regarding Local Impact Reports is available in Advice Note 1: [attachment 6]
The current National Grid Undergrounding consultation can be accessed via [attachment 7]
An Advice Note setting out the IPC's own 'outreach' programme. Where appropriate (and this will be the case for Mid Wales Connections), we offer to hold an event in the local area to explain to local people the role of the IPC and opportunities to have their say. I hope we can discuss this in more detail when we meet: [attachment 8]


Public enquiries

We discussed some documents that you may wish to signpost from your website. I'd suggest:

IPC Advice Note 8.1 which covers 'how the process works' : [attachment 9] and
IPC Advice Note 8.2 which details 'how to have your say' : [attachment 2]
In addition, the IPC Factsheet answers some of the frequently asked questions about the way we work: [attachment 11].


I appreciate there is a lot of information here, and much more on our website ([attachment 12].

18 May 2011
Shropshire Council - Ian Kilby
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Enquiry received regarding consultation conducted by National Grid on the Mid Wales Connections proposal.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, I have taken a copy and returned your consultation form to enable you to send this on to National Grid. Further queries and comments should be addressed directly with the promoter. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid?s consultation report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at:
[attachment 4]
I have enclosed two advice notes produced by the Commission which explain the process with which an application will follow and explains how you can get involved.

16 May 2011
Mr and Mrs J Felkin
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Apart from the numerous windfarm applications the area is also under review for the siting of a sub-station covering approximately 20 acres ? a substantial development in its own right.
Grid connection will, of course, mean miles of overhead cabling and large pylons, thus exposing serious health concerns.
Opposition to this mass industrialisation of such rural area is growing and many feel government and developers have been very short sited in their planning and thinking. Such structures in open countryside are inappropriate.
Little, or no consideration has been given to infrastructure. Wind power construction can have profound and irreversible effects, not just on the sites themselves but for miles around.
The following points need serious consideration:
? New access roads
? Peat disturbance
? Hydrology
? Habitat loss
? Concrete pollution
? Collateral damage ? impact on road networks on adjacent villages
? Effects on tourism
? Grid connection and positioning of pylons
? Rights of way blocked, disrupted or damaged
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoters of the Mid Wales Connection schemes where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid?s consultation report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

16 May 2011
Daphne Bursell
Enquiry received via email
Councillor Brown sent the IPC a letter concerning the Mid Wales Electricity Connection Project (National Grid and SPEN). The issused raised included consultation and route corridor maps.
It is helpful for the Commission to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. In addition to contacting the promoter, if you are or are not satisfied with the consultation, as previously, I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant on the address below as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. I enclose a set of advice notes which explain the IPC Application Process. Further information can also be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

16 May 2011
Councillor Graham Brown
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
I am writing to protect in the strongest possible terms about the proposed wind farms and subsequent development of rural mid Wales with sub-stations, pylons and power lines as electricity is connected to the National Grid.
It is a proven fact that wind turbines are neither green (for numerous reasons which I will not go into at this stage) nor efficient.
The maps we have been shown due to the large scale do not show clearly where the proposed power lines are likely to run.
Please will you therefore reply giving a clear indication of exactly
a) the proximity to our house we can expect a power line should this development go ahead.
b) How tall the pylons are likely to be.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoters of the Mid Wales Connection schemes where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .The SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected] There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid?s consultation report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

16 May 2011
Rosemary Williams
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Letter received: I would like to object to the way National Grid have undertaken their consultation about the Mid Wales Connection Project.
Initially a mail shot was sent out that we never even noticed. Apparently it was entitled Project News Mid Wales and looked like junk mail. We presume we recycled ours without even reading it did not realise the significance it may have to where they live.
The initial mail shot was a crucially important item in the consultation because it contained all the information about how people can find out information, find out where the National Grid exhibitions will be and how to comment on the proposal. If the initial mail shot failed then the rest of the consultation is flawed as well.
The information in the brochure is nowhere near sufficient. It relies on people having access to the intenet. Not everyone does. The first thing anyone wants to know is ?how near will the pylons be to my house?? The map in the brochure is completely inadequate. For this you need to have access to the internet.
The feedback form for the consultation process is fundamentally flawed, and is heavily biased in favour of the Project: it does not ask whether we want/need the windfarms, sub-stations and pylons, but asks rather where we want them. It is a thinly veiled attempt to confuse, and to get people to say that they want it all elsewhere. The feedback form is divisive and encourages people to think selfishly. There is only very indirect reference to the possibility of putting the cable underground in any of the questions. This should have been a specific question.
At the exhibition itself we were lead to believe the windfarms were already built and that the routes now had to go ahead, whereas although there are some windfarms built, the necessity of these massive pylons are for the subsequent windfarms that have not yet been built to join the grid.
The feedback form has been designed to make it simple to put the information into a computer database and produce lots of charts and tables to make an impressive looking consultation report. Many important factors cannot be put in a numeric or data base friendly form. For example how do you put a value on the beauty of his valley?
It appears that the feedback form may have been designed only to give the appearance that a consultation has been carried out in order to satisfy the IPC and parliamentary committees who will give the final assent.
This project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.
The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]
With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your email are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 2] .
Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:
? National Grid?s consultation report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.
If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you will have the opportunity to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 4]

13 May 2011
Sue Cullup-Smith
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
On Tuesday 10th May at 9.30am, Mr Glyn Davies, MP for Montgomeryshire, will be opening a debate in the House of Commons on ?The Industrialisation of Central Wales?.

Throughout North Shropshire, a whole series of packed meetings have been taking place in village halls expressing opposition to the proposals for enormous pylons passing through your constituency.

The construction of these pylons is dependent on the Welsh Assembly?s decision to approve applications for wind farms in Central Wales. I would be most grateful if you would look into this as a matter of urgency and lend us your support. Are you able to ensure that Members are made aware that a decision to go forwards with these wind farms will adversely affect a large part of North Shropshire and Central Wales. But there will be no benefit to the economy of our country.

There have been great concerns raised recently, with robust scientific evidence, about the net effects of wind farms and the impacts of wind farms and their infrastructure.

The only beneficiaries will be to the Electricity Companies who will be able to sell, very profitably, Renewable Obligation Certificates.

There has been apparently given little or no thought to the transportation implications, the disruption caused by the construction or to the long-term effect on our communities and the landscape in which we live.

Please ensure that those who are making the decision are fully aware of the grave impact of this policy to build huge wind farms in central Wales. Your Party places great emphasis on local decision making; throughout the whole of North Shropshire there is strong opposition to these proposals, which are a result of the previous Administration? policies.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoters of the Mid Wales Connection schemes where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid?s consultation report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

13 May 2011
John and Debbie Hewett
Enquiry received via post
Mr Beament feels that the consultation by National Grid is insufficient and supplied the IPC with a copy of his feedback which was sent to National Grid. In broad terms this set out that Mr Beament felt that the consultation process adopted by National Grid with regards to the siting of the substation and 400kv pylons was unsatisfactory.
Thank you for your letter and copy of your feedback dated 9th May 2011 regarding your thoughts on this development. It is helpful for the Commission to be kept notified of the progress of this application from local stakeholders. Your comments have been noted and will be kept for future reference.

At the pre-application stage of the process, the developer is under a duty to consult statutory bodies and the local community. If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant on the address below as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can also be found on our website: www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

13 May 2011
William Beament
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Please could you advise how I am able to answer question 1 on the mid wales connection feedback form

Q1 of the different substation siting areas National Grid has identified which do you think is most appropriate? please tick one only

substation siting area near Cefn Coch

substation siting area near to Abermule

I have no preference


Since I live in four crosses and have potential routes from both hubs I am unable to answer Q1. I would like to say that I do not want either but that option is not avaiable, Please could you advise?
I am unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. Therefore, may I suggest that the query set out in your email is raised directly with the promoters of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 1] .

If you are or are not satisfied with the consultation I would advise you to speak to your Local Authority as they will be invited to submit an ?Adequacy of Consultation Representation? once an application is submitted. I would also advise you to continue communications with the applicant as by law they must take into account all responses they receive.

Once an application is submitted and has been accepted to go forward to examination, the public are invited to register their interest and submit a ?Relevant Representation? to the Commission with a summary of their comments. More detailed representations can then be made during the examination stage. Further information can be found on our website:
www.independent.gov.uk/infrastructure.

13 May 2011
Gary Swaine
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
The consultation exercise designed by the National Grid has caused the following problems amongst communities who are potentially affected by the Electricity Pylons:
1. The documents which came through the post were misleading. Most people who received them have discarded them as ?Junk Mail?. The original letter from National Grid is a key item in their consultation process. If that fails then the whole consultation fails.
2. On the map showing the Purple South Route through the Rea Valley, Worthen is not included in the shaded area for the route; the pylons would skirt just around the village and up Long Mountain, which is visible from practically everywhere in Worthen because the village sits in the valley. This inadequate shading in of Worthen on the map was completely misleading to many people, who did not object to the plans at the outset because of this mis-information.
3. Many people are cynical about the ?consultation? process due to the action of the National Grid in the past in other areas; they believe that the National Grid will do whatever they choose to anyway, regardless of the volume, strength and validity of the complaints it receives. This has led to complacency amongst many people who live in the affected areas. The National Grid has a duty to either change their image to the public consistently and repeatedly, in order to convince the public that they do actually listen to the consultation process, and a duty to actually ignore the costs of burying powerlines underground and do as the public wishes.
4. The most unspoilt areas are just that because of the few numbers of people who live there, and hence these areas are the most vulnerable to be chosen for the route of the pylons because their voices don?t add up to much compared to other areas. This is the irony and the ridiculousness of the whole ?consultation? process; one of your ?consultants? admitted that this was purely a numbers game ? ie, which area makes the most objections will be spared, and the cheapest route will be chosen. The most unspoilt area is the one where fewest people live, and because us humans do such a brilliant job of ruining rural unspoilt areas (including the National Grid) it is because there are few people living there that the area is unspoilt!
5. The documents rely on people having access to the internet to find out if the cable will affect them. Many people still don?t, especially the older groups.
6. Many people affected have not received a letter.
7. The Consultation Feedback Form which National Grid have adopted and which was not in the letter is a disgrace. In effect it is asking people to ?vote? to put the pylons and substations somewhere else. This is a cynical ploy by National Grid to ?Divide and conquer? by putting one community against another.
8. The team of ?consultants? who attended the meeting in Marton on Tuesday 29th March 2011 were ill-informed about the local area, and the so-called ?investigation? into the alternative route with connection up to Ironbridge; I was told to look it up on the internet! I do not believe this is consultation, this is deflection of the responsibility of informing onto the informee, which, considering the implications that the National Grid?s decision will have on my home and its value, is an absolute disgrace.
This project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.
The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]
With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your email are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 2] .
Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:
National Grid?s consultation report;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.
If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you will have the opportunity to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

12 May 2011
Sona Champion
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
As a member of Knockin Parish , I wish to complain at the way in which our community is being treated with these so called Presentations of the National Grids case.

1 The National Grid do not consider us important enough to take any notice of in this matter. They are supposed to have a meeting within 2 miles of any property in our parish that is not being adhered to in this community.
2 I also understand they are ducking out of a meeting in kinnerley next week ,
3 Declined to speak to Knockin Parish Council Meeting this last week.
This project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.
The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]
With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your email are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 2] .
Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the IPC. The IPC has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the IPC will have regard to:
National Grid?s consultation report;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the IPC and the Secretary of State.
If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you will have the opportunity to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

12 May 2011
Campbell Keay
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
Mrs S McDermott is concerned that the National Grid feedback form does not amount to sufficient consultation.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, I have taken a copy and returned your consultation form to enable you to send this on to National Grid. Further queries and comments should be addressed directly with the promoter. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid?s consultation report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 4]
I have enclosed two advice notes produced by the Commission which explain the process with which an application will follow and explains how you can get involved.

11 May 2011
S McDermott
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
I live in Melverley, a small village with the misfortune to fall under 4 of the 10 proposed route corridors that form part of the National Grid?s Mid Wales connection project.
I am deeply opposed to the erection of pylons anywhere in Shropshire. My main concern is with NGs consultation process and the manner with which they have delivered it. I do not feel that I have a chance to ?have my say? and believe the whole consultation process to be a deeply flawed sham.
The timing of the consultation is too short and has included several weeks of bank holiday disruption; it has left affected areas with very little time to prepare for public meetings.
This communication from the NG to the community has been misleading and inadequate.
In order to understand the scope of the project internet access is necessary, as a rural and isolated community many of us have limited if any access, those that do are working on ?dinosaur dial up? and not broadband.
This is not consultation.
Many people in my community who were not able to attend a consultation event are not even aware that they can have a voice (in the form of the NG feedback form). Those of us who did attend and are aware are struggling to get to grips with the form-it is not even clear how you are supposed to object to the project and it is almost impossible to vote against the project, it lures you in to voting to put the pylons in someone elses backyard which is not fair. This is not a fair consultation.
I plead with you to look into this matter in great detail; we have not been given opportunity to speak out.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, the approach you have taken in contacting the promoter is appropriate at this stage. For reference, the National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 2] .

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid?s Consultation Report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3]

09 May 2011
Sally Herbert-Jones
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
I am concerned about the lack of information that I have received to enable me to comment on the question they are asking.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, the approach you have taken in contacting the promoter is appropriate at this stage. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 2] .

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

?National Grid?s consultation report;
?Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
?The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3]

09 May 2011
M Timmins
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
I am writing to complain about the National Grid Consultation Feedback form concerning the proposed Mid Wales connection from the proposed wind-farms to the main grid in Shropshire.
National grid have informed us that they intend to construct a 19 acre sub-station and from there take a 400kv distribution into Shropshire on pylons 47 metres in height. They have indicated two sites for the sub station and numerous corridor routes for the distribution lines. One route runs down the upper Vyrnwy river valley and one down the upper Severn valley. Both valleys are areas of great natural beauty interspersed with villages, hamlets and containing an abundance of wildlife. This has caused enormous consternation and dismay in these localities for we can see that these most rural areas will be ruined by the proposals which are of a major industrial scale and completely unknown before.
Section 1 of the form invites those affected by the three options for the substation sitings. We have attended a number of local meetings and spoken widely to people and there is no one, not surprisingly, who wishes to have a substation of this size with equipment at a height of 12 metres on their doorstep. This would be a massive piece of industrialisation adjoining the rural residential villages of Cefn Coch or Abermule. National Grid in setting out these options has not given us the option that we all want to express, that is that we do not wish to see a substation in either of these two places. They are clearly attempting two strategies. One is to cause division between the Vyrnwy valley and the Severn valley communities so as to weaken our joint determination to fight the proposals. The other is to confuse the unwary or less astute into feeling that they have to conform to the way the questions are set and not to do so would invalidate their response.
Section 2 invites comments on the route corridors. This assumes, following from Section 1, that those affected wish to make a choice based on National Grid?s routes from their choice of substation sitings. There is no box to allow an indication that none of these routes is preferred or to indicate that an alternative route might be preferred.
Section 3 gives us three boxes to indicate which of the ten items are of most importance. In terms of anyone living on these routes at least seven would be of the most fundamental long term importance. It is clear from comments from those living within the proposed pylon corridors in Shropshire that they have not been consulted at all, although they will be just as affected as the two river valleys in Wales. The distance of these corridors in Shropshire is around 10-12 kilometres and the routes pass by or over several large villages.
We have written to National Grid to formally complain about the way this form has been presented and we are hoping that you will give our concerns your prompt attention and consideration.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, the approach you have taken in contacting the promoter is appropriate at this stage. For reference, the National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 2] .

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid?s Consultation Report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3]

09 May 2011
Christine and Graham Griffiths
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
would like to object to the power proposals for Mid Wales on the following points below. This exercise has in my opinion been a desktop one. No-one has probably visited the area to see the massive implications that the power plans will bring to the area.

FEEDBACK FORM OBJECTION POINTS

THE CONSULTATION EXERCISE

· The feedback forms are deliberately divisive, we do not want these proposals for anyone.

· The government were consulted by TAN 8 in 2005, why are the public only being consulted quickly now?

· There are no tick box options for ?none of the options are acceptable?.

· There is no suggestion to write in separately if you are unhappy with all proposals, misleading people to think they have to follow the form procedure.

· The consultation exercise has commenced before National Grid has established the true costs of undergrounding the cables (they are presently paying KEMA to conduct a costing report) but it is not yet finished.

· The community consultations commenced before SSE Renewables were ready to attend the events, thus they had no representatives present to discuss their proposals at Abermule or many other events.


· Only communities where the power lines will run have been consulted. Anyone going about their normal lives and passing through or by the corridor routes was not informed, and yet WILL be affected.

· Poor consultation ? misrepresentation of the facts. No photos or photo-montages of hub or pylons at Abermule consultation or at following consultation events. No opportunity to view alternative sites, removed from web site and not at exhibitions. Scale of maps in

· National Grid and SP Manweb failed to provide sufficient information on their websites before the community consultation meetings commenced. The web site was continually being updated over the first week of the consultation starting.


· The representatives manning some of the community exhibitions were too few and were unable to answer many of the questions posed to them by people attending the events. It was also noted that staff gave different answers at different exhibitions.

· Only one event per village...some of the exhibitions ran in Easter School Holidays and over bank holidays, meaning you may have missed your village?s consultation and opportunity to speak directly with SPEN and National Grid staff.



· The consultation has coincided with the WAG?s recess making it difficult to discuss these issues with County Councillors, PCC, and other parties, during this time.

· The proposed routes only cover options for wind farms currently in planning. There is no indication given of routes for future lines, as National Grid currently have applications for two further lines, but these are not mentioned in proposals.

· The hub has been future-proofed for future capacity, but this has not been mentioned in documents.

· The consultation is very complicated for general public as so much information to understand and absorb.

· The maps provided do not have the route numbers marked on them to cross reference to the consultation form.

· The maps provided in Route Strategy are of too small a scale to give clear detail.


WIND FARMS

· Don?t save as much CO2 as suggested ? peat destruction releases C02

· Won?t prevent need for conventional backup

· Massive environmental visual impact, not considered by TAN 8

· Unfair burden on WALES (40% of landscape visually blighted by turbines, power lines and hub)

· Threat to tourism and knock on effect on local economy

· Costing UK government and electricity consumers billions of pounds in subsidies in times of government cut backs, rising inflation, and fuel poverty

· Will do little to address energy security problems as wind is unreliable and inefficient

· Unacceptable number of abnormal loads and thousands of other highways movements over several years of construction

· Reduction in property value, no compensation offered

· Removal of large areas of peat for ?Olympic pool size? foundations will increase flooding issues downstream

· Health risks being ignored ? flicker, noise, mental health issues, etc



PYLONS.....Only needed because of wind farms

· Massive environmental and visual impact, not considered by TAN 8

· Huge impact on wildlife

· Reluctance to consider undergrounding lines as not cost-effective.

· EMF health risks ? precautionary approach is not being taken

· Threat to tourism and economy ? B&B?s, caravan parks, pubs, shops, towns.

· Huge loss of power during transmission of electricity because of distance to UK supergrid

· Even greater losses of power along 132kV system that 400kV system per km length because of lower voltage

· Greater overall lengths of 132kV and 400kV lines because hub is not located close enough to the wind farms Strategic Search Areas

· Ancient Kerry Ridgeway and historic hill fort destroyed by nearby lines

· Unacceptable volume of construction traffic, thousands of abnormal and lorry loads

· Reduction in property value, no compensation offered or unsellable

HUB......Only needed because of wind farms

· Visually obtrusive

· EMF health risks ? precautionary approach is not being taken

· Hub at Abermule is too close to large residential community

· Transport issues have not been identified or addressed. How will the 220 tonne abnormal loads (transformer) get to the remote hills of Cefn Coch or to Abermule over a listed bridge?

· Huge numbers of normal HGV movements during construction have not been identified.

· Reduction in property value, no compensation offered or unsellable

· Poor consultation ? misrepresentation of the facts. (No photos of hub or pylons at Abermule Consultation) No opportunity to view alternative sites, removed from web site and not at exhibitions.
The National Grid Mid Wales Connections and SPEN Mid Wales Connections projects are currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]

With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoters of the Mid Wales Connection schemes where appropriate. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;

[attachment 2]

The SPEN project team can be contacted on 0800 988 9174 or by email at: [email protected] There is also a project website: www.spmidwalesconnections.info.

Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

· National Grid?s consultation report;

· Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and

· The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

09 May 2011
Andy Mason
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
We are writing to express our opposition to the proposed Tan 8 project to develop wind farms in Mid Wales. The Shropshire Hills are an Area of Outstanding Beauty and should not be disfigured by placing a line of 50m high pylons through the Worthern Valley. If the wind farm has to be built on land, a fact many are now questioning, it would surely make more sense to place the powerlines underground. Underground powerlines have a lower lifetime cost than pylons and clearly do not destroy the landscape. The effect of placing these massive pylons in the middle of our community would be devastating.
We strongly urge you to oppose the Tan 8 project. Firstly we question whether the project should proceed at all and secondly we would argue that the powerlines be p;aced underground to reduce the harm on the people and countryside of the Shropshire Hills.
This project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.
The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]
With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 2] .
Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

National Grid?s consultation report;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

05 May 2011
Drs Jon and Sally Sheard
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
I am writing to you to complain about National Grid & Scottish Power networks consultation with some of the people of Mid-Wales.
Firstly, the glossy brochure which dropped through our doors looked more like a holiday guide rather that a document that could devastate our countryside. Next not everyone that will be affected has been consulted just one example is the village of Llantsanffridd Ym Mochnant was not include because in was a few 100 metres outside a pylon corridor. People that will be affected by the huge increase in traffic which will occur over the six years when the wind turbines are erected have been ignored. The area depends on tourism which will be destroyed & have the all the businesses that depend on tourists been consulted?
The maps that NG have used are old & many new housing estates have been left out.
The feedback forms have no option for rejecting both sub station sites or all pylon routes which surely is a valid comment. This whole sorry attempt should be thrown out & re-thought to include the wind turbine companies as well so we can have their reasons for destroying our beautiful county.
. This project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.
The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]
With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 2] .
Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

National Grid?s consultation report;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

05 May 2011
Sally Matthes
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Email received: We are currently having consultations on the possible installation of the infrastructure relating to the future possibility of yet more Industrial Turbine generation equipment (sweetly referred to as Wind Farms!).
The consultation forms are very cleverly worded to put community against community, i.e. do you want the hub in your backyard, or your neighbours backyard!
It doesn?t give you the choice of saying NO! NO! NO! This isn?t democracy, this is large organisation?s wielding a big stick.
It is intimated (smell of a carrot?) that the power cables may be put underground, but no box to tick asking if we want them underground (including the Hub?).
Here in Powys the ground swell has risen, we will not be dictated to, we are not children to be told what we should do and we look to organisations such as yours to ensure that a fair playing field is presented.
This project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.
The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]
With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;[attachment 2] .
Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

National Grid?s consultation report;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

05 May 2011
Phil Robinson
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
National Grid are to construct a substation and a 400kV power line to connect with the existing grid somewhere between Oswestry and Shrewsbury.
SPEN are to construct the power lines from the wind farms to the substation.
I understand that it is National Grid?s decision on which substation and which corridor should be used.
My question is this. In making the decision, does National Grid have to take into account the impact on the area on the SPEN side of the connection? And also do they have to take into account the overall efficiency of the connection from the wind farm to the National Grid or do they only have to look at the section between the hub and the grid?
The reason for my question is that if they only look at the connection from the hub to the grid then they may get one answer but if they look at the overall system from the wind farms to the grid then they may get another. For example they may select a particular hub and a particular corridor because that is the shortest route. But it might mean that the connections from the wind farms to the hub are all much longer leading to an inefficient network overall and that the impact on communities might be greater overall.
Thank you for your email. I can confirm that through the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) there is a requirement the promoter under Schedule 3 of the Infrastructure Planning (Environmental Impacts Assessment) Regulations 2009 have an awareness of any cumulative impacts from other developments in the area. Further information on the Environmental Impact Assessment can be found through the following link:
[attachment 1]

With regards to your queries surrounding the process that National Grid have adopted in determining their proposal, I suggest that these are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected]

05 May 2011
Steve Elliott
Enquiry received via post
response has attachments
People are told to use an online response system, hardly appropriate for such a rural area with poor broadband coverage. People who are not used to dealing with consultations feel that they have no alternative but to answer them.
Would like some clarification on how the planning process would work in this case, particularly as it affects communities in England and Wales.
The people of Montgomeryshire have indicated that they do not want this project to proceed in it's current form. Please can you look into this consultation process to ensure that the views of the communities affected are adequately represented by National Grid.
This project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.
The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]
With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your letter are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 2] .
Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

? National Grid?s consultation report;
? Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
? The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

Further information on the 2008 Planning Act (the Act) process can be found our website [attachment 5]. I have enclosed two guidance notes for your convenience. I can confirm that the process of examination of a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project (NSIP) is the same in Wales as it is in England. However, there are elements of the Act that apply differently in Wales and England respectively. One relevant example of this is regarding whether an application for a Development Consent Order (DCO) may include ?Associated Development?. For this reason, whilst the proposed overhead power lines have been identified by National Grid and SPEN as NSIPs, and therefore examined by the IPC, the substation ?hub?, which forms part of the National Grid Mid Wales Connections Project will
Further information can be found through the CLG guidance on Associated Development, which can also be found under Advice and Guidance on the IPC website.
[attachment 6]

04 May 2011
Sarah Faulkner
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Query regarding consultation being undertaken by National Grid and the 2008 Planning Act process.
Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable at the pre-application stage to enter into any discussion or debate about the merits of any aspect of the application that National Grid proposes to make. This ensures the impartiality of the Infrastructure Planning Commission (the Commission) and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process.

At the pre-application stage, the onus is on the developer to undertake pre-application consultation and to take account of any responses received. To ensure that your views are taken into account, comments on this application should be submitted directly to National Grid. The Local Authorities also provide a report on the adequacy of consultation, which can take into account views of the public.

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

- National Grid?s consultation report, detailing the consultation it has undertaken and how it has had regard to the responses received. This can include consultation undertaken both formally under s.47, and informally;

- Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by the relevant Local Authorities (in this case, Shropshire Council and Powys County Council); and

- The extent to which National Grid has followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If the application is accepted for examination, then there will be further opportunities for you and others to engage directly with the Commission. If the application is accepted, the application will proceed to pre-examination and then on to examination which will be publicly available. Further information on the 2008 Planning Act process and the role of the IPC can be found on the IPC website.
[attachment 1]

21 April 2011
CE Davies
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Query regarding the approach that National Grid have taken in thier consultation in the Mid Wales connection project.
This project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.
The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. This ensures the impartiality of the IPC and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]
With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your email are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 2] .
Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage and we would encourage you to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

National Grid?s consultation report;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by relevant Local Authorities; and
The extent to which National Grid have followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

20 April 2011
Steve Elliott
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Query regarding attendance of National Grid at a local meeting and the impact a lack of attendance could have on thier consultation.
Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable at the pre-application stage to enter into any discussion or debate about the merits of any aspect of the application that National Grid proposes to make. This ensures the impartiality of the Infrastructure Planning Commission (the Commission) and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process.

At the pre-application stage, the onus is on the developer to undertake pre-application consultation and to take account of any responses received. To ensure that your views are taken into account, comments on this application should be submitted directly to National Grid. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 1] .

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

National Grid?s consultation report, detailing the consultation it has undertaken and how it has had regard to the responses received. This can include consultation undertaken both formally under s.47, and informally;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by the relevant Local Authorities (in this case, Shropshire Council and Powys County Council); and
The extent to which National Grid has followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If the application is accepted for examination, then there will be further opportunities for you and others to engage directly with the Commission.

Further information on pre-application processes can be found in IPC guidance note one, [attachment 2].

20 April 2011
Powys County Council - Arwel Jones
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
As a County Councillor for the area I am arranging a meeting to discuss the proposed power lines in our area should the Hub be built at Cefn Coch.

I have telephoned the National Grid for a meeting in the village but they refused to come as the have already booked all the venues but because the Four Crosses has the largest population of the surrounding villages I feel they should attend.

I have E-mailed the National Grid tonight to say that I have arranged an open meeting for the 9th May and requested their attendances as I believe that non attendance could result in a flawed consultation.
Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable at the pre-application stage to enter into any discussion or debate about the merits of any aspect of the application that National Grid proposes to make. This ensures the impartiality of the Infrastructure Planning Commission (the Commission) and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process.

At the pre-application stage, the onus is on the developer to undertake pre-application consultation and to take account of any responses received. To ensure that your views are taken into account, comments on this application should be submitted directly to National Grid. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 1] .

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

National Grid?s consultation report, detailing the consultation it has undertaken and how it has had regard to the responses received. This can include consultation undertaken both formally under s.47, and informally;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by the relevant Local Authorities (in this case, Shropshire Council and Powys County Council); and
The extent to which National Grid has followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If the application is accepted for examination, then there will be further opportunities for you and others to engage directly with the Commission.

Further information on pre-application processes can be found in IPC guidance note one, [attachment 2].

20 April 2011
Councillor Arwel Jones
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
I understand from others that when questioned about why National Grid had not lodged a Statement of Community Consultation you have advised that the National Grid consultation is informal at the moment and that is the reason why they have not submitted a Statement of Community Consultation (SOCC).

However all the evidence would point to the fact this is a formal consultation:

1. One Shropshire and Powys indicate have a draft copy, lodged ahead of the current consultation (however its termed) ? this one would assume that this shows intent to issue a SOCC

more importantly

2. National Grid say in their public consultation communication disguised as, and entitled, ?Project News Spring 2011? that

a. on page three of the ?This map does not show National Grid?s consultation zones. These can be found in our Statement of Community Consultation. Please see back page for details.?

b. and on the back page the SOCC is available as a ?Key Document? ?at a number of public locations in Powys and Shropshire?, it then list libraries and other locations.

Incidentally National Grid have also advised they will issue the SOCC soon but they don?t have a date and yet we are more than half way through the consultation period. Needless to say the SOCC is not in any of the locations listed.
Whilst we are happy to be copied in to any comments you make to the developer at the pre-application stage, the onus is on the developer to undertake pre-application consultation and to take account of any responses received. In order for your comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

We note the points raised in your email. With the above in mind, may I suggest that the queries set out in your email are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;

[attachment 1]

We would also encourage you to make your Local Authority aware of any comments you may have on the adequacy of the pre-application consultation process.

Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making this decision a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:

National Grid?s consultation report;
Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by a relevant Local Authorities (in this case, Powys and Shropshire Councils); and
The extent to which National Grid has followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.
If the application is accepted for examination, then there will be further opportunities for you and others to engage directly with the Commission.

20 April 2011
Jon Newson
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
Raising concerns regarding the confusion between formal and informal consultation being undertaken by National Grid at the pre-application stage and the lack of documentation available to inform consultation responses.
Whilst we are happy to be copied in to any comments you make to the developer at the pre-application stage, the onus is on the developer to undertake pre-application consultation and to take account of any responses received. In order for your comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.

We note the points raised in your email. With the above in mind, may I suggest that the queries set out in your email are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;

[attachment 1]

We would also encourage you to make your Local Authority aware of any comments you may have on the adequacy of the pre-application consultation process.


Once the pre-application consultation duties are complete, the developer may submit an application to the Commission. The Commission has 28 days to decide whether to accept the application to proceed to the examination stage. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. When making this decision a decision on whether the pre-application consultation has been adequate, the Commission will have regard to:


- National Grid?s consultation report;
- Any comments on the adequacy of consultation submitted by a relevant Local Authorities (in this case, Powys and Shropshire Councils); and
- The extent to which National Grid has followed the guidance published by the Commission and the Secretary of State.

If the application is accepted for examination, then there will be further opportunities for you and others to engage directly with the Commission

20 April 2011
Jon Newson
Enquiry received via phone
Query regarding the consultation being undertaken by National Grid on the Mid Wales Connections project
Whilst we are happy to be copied in on any comments you make to the developer, we are unable at the pre-application stage to enter into any discussion or debate about the merits of any aspect of the application that National Grid proposes to make. This ensures the impartiality of the Infrastructure Planning Commission (the Commission) and protects the interests of all parties involved in the application process.

At the pre-application stage, the onus is on the developer to undertake pre-application consultation and to take account of any responses received. To ensure that your views are taken into account, comments on this application should be submitted directly to National Grid. The Commission will decide whether to accept the application before the project can proceed to examination. This decision is based on whether, amongst other matters, the pre-application consultation has been adequate. An adequacy of consultation report submitted by Powys County Council and Shropshire Council, along with other documents will be be taken into account. Therefore any concerns should be raised with both the Local Authority and the promoter.

If the application is accepted for examination, then there will be further opportunities for you and others to engage directly with the Commission.

15 April 2011
Ken Evans
Enquiry received via phone
Query about the proposed approach to setting out the promoter's community consultation strategy.
Prior to commencement of formal consultation under s.47 of the 2008 Planning Act, the applicant must prepare and publicise a statement setting out how the applicant proposes to consult people living in the vicinity of the land about the proposed application. This is known as the Statement of Community Consultation. It is for the applicant to decide when to commence formal consultation under s.47 of the 2008 Act. Any public engagement undertaken prior to this may be treated as informal consultation.

The public should understand how any consultation exercises fit within the applicant's overall strategy for community consultation. Where a SoCC is not yet published, but engagement is underway, applicants should explain the status of the consultation and how it sits alongside future rounds of engagement. To this end, where an applicant has agreed a consultation strategy with the relevant local authorities, it may wish to make this available to the public. This may include details of when the applicant intends to commence the formal SoCC process.

All consultation activities should be recorded with a view to informing the applicant's Consultation Report, which is a key part of the eventual application to the IPC for a Development Consent Order under s37 of the 2008 Act.

13 April 2011
National Grid - Jacqui Fenn
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
The national grid are currently undertaking consultation for a new power connection in mid-Wales & Shropshire. I have been looking for the national grids Statement of Community Consultation (SoCC) and have been unable to find it.

It is not on their website www.midwalesconnection.com, and I was unable to find it at Welshpool library yesterday, I also visited the national grids west felton exhibition and when I asked for S0CC they did not have it available there either.
I was told you told them (IPC) that they did not have to have one.

Is this correct??

I thought it was a legal requirement under the 2008 planning act?

Please could you advise.
It is our understanding that the National Grid Mid Wales connection project is currently conducting informal community consultation in Shropshire and Mid Wales. As such, at this stage, there is no requirement in the 2008 Planning Act ('the 2008 Act') for the Statement of Community Consultation (SOCC) to be made available. It is at the commencement of formal consultation under s.47 of the 2008 Act that requires that ?The applicant must prepare a statement setting out how the applicant proposes to consult, about the proposed application, people living in the vicinity of the land?. It is at this stage that the SOCC is published and made available to the public. It is for the applicant to decide when to commence formal consultation under s.47 of the 2008 Act.

At the point of submission of an application to the IPC, the applicant is required to submit a Consultation Report detailing the consultation it has undertaken and how it has had regard to the responses received. This can include consultation undertaken both formally under s.47, and informally. Further information on pre-application processes and the SOCC under the 2008 Act can be found in IPC advice note one, [attachment 1].

13 April 2011
Gary Swaine
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
I would like to ask a few questions about the project that threatens our community ? Montgomershire.

Firstly I would like to say that the thoughts behind wind farm sites if flawed. No one thought how they would get the power out of these remote areas without devastating the local communities. It is the large power lines and 4,000KV hub that may be built in the area concerns me. I have a young family and am not prepared to risk their health (regardless as to whether or not the health risks from EMF?s is proven ? the Sage report stated that we should take the side of caution) by living near such a development. So my questions are as follows,

1. Will there be compensation/hardship fund to allow local people to move away. After all several studies have confirmed that house prices can reduce by 35% near such developments. (If it happens in Abermule on a personal basis I will be plunged into negative equity and unable to re-mortgage). Why should local people suffer financially when the reason behind it was not their doing?

Other countries have such a policy and such a fund was set up for people living next to the proposed high speed rail link by the Transport Minister.

2. Why are the cables not being buried underground where emf?s are proven to have less effect? A study by Shrewsbury Hospital showed that Abermule was a hotspot for cancer because of the existing power lines ? more will make it worse and cause more hotspots along the proposed power cable routes. Equally siting the hub if Cefn Coch will make another ?cancer hot spot?
3. I understand that each developer receives 22,000 euros for each turbine built ? Could not some of that be given back to the local community so that families can move away if they want to etc.
4. How will the local road networks be upgraded to cope with the large loads?
5. Why is the National Grid allowed to go against their own policy by disregarding the local communities with regards the siting of the Hub and choosing power cable routes?
6. Why was the proposed Hub site not located nearer the windfarms away form housing etc.
7. Why are we persisting with wind power when they are only 18% efficient and other European countries are scrapping their windfarm developments?
8. Why does the government persist by stating that wind turbines are green energy? It is common knowledge that the energy used to make them is not re-couped in the lift time of the wind turbine.

I would appreciate if you could answer these questions.
I believe from the information you have provided that the scheme that you are referring to is that of National Grid?s construction of a new 400kV electricity connection between Shropshire and Powys. This project is currently at the 'pre-application' stage of our process, as set out in the Planning Act 2008. During the pre-application stage, there is a duty on the developer to undertake consultation with people living in the vicinity of the proposed project, and to have regard to responses to that consultation. In order for comments to be taken into account at this stage, comments and responses should be directed to National Grid as the developer of the project.
The IPC's role at the pre-application stage is to provide advice about the process of making an application, or the process of making a representation about an application. We are unable to provide legal opinions or comment on the merits of the scheme or national policy. All advice that we give is recorded via an advice log, in line with s.51 of the Planning Act 2008. This log is published on our website. [attachment 1]
With the above in mind, may I therefore suggest that the queries set out in your email are raised directly with the promoter of the Mid Wales Connection scheme. The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website;
[attachment 2] .
Your local council also plays a role in the process at the pre-application stage. Local authorities are invited to review the developer's draft Statement of Community Consultation (SoCC) to influence the way in which a developer intends to consult local people. Once an application is submitted, the council is asked for a view on the adequacy of the developer's consultation. You may therefore wish to copy to the council any comments you send to the developer at the pre-application stage. Further information on this and how you can be involved in the developers? consultation is detailed in advice note 8.2, this can be found at: [attachment 3].
Following the pre-application stage, and if an application is accepted for examination by the Infrastructure Planning Commission, you are able to become directly involved in the examination of an application. A suite of advice notes has been published providing information on how and when members of the public can become involved in the planning process and have their say. In particular, advice note 8.3 provides information on how to register and make a written representation. This can be found at: [attachment 3].

13 April 2011
Ken Whitmore
Enquiry received via phone
How can I get involved with the promoters' (NG and SPEN) consultation on route corridors? What is the procedure for further involvement with the IPC? Who is the Examining Authority for such a project?
Advised Ms Taylor that in order to be engaged with the promoters' consultation on Route Corridors and other matters, liaison should be sought with both promoters: National Grid and SPEN. In doing so, your views can be taken into consideration at public consultation events which are currently being held up until the end of April 2011 within the local area - further information on the location of such events can be sought from the promoter.

In order to become further involved and kept up-to-date of any procedural decisions on the project, the IPC website should be viewed regularly. Relevant information on the progress of the application can be sought here as well as important dates to register as an Interested Party. Alternatively, contacting the promoter directly will also be of benefit at this early stage and during latter stages.

If an application is accepted by the IPC, an opportunity will be given to all persons to register as an interested party during the Pre-examination stage. In registering as an interested party, you will both be able to submit initial, outline, representations of your support or objection to the proposed scheme and furthermore, you will have the opportunity to submit more detailed, written representations during the examination stage. All interested parties will be kept up-to-date of any procedural decisions as well as having the opportunity to attend the preliminary meeting and any hearings, if they are held.

At present, the IPC are the examining body for Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects ("NSIPs") and will make decisions on NSIPs where a National Policy Statement ("NPS") has been designated by Government. If an NPS has not been designated, a recommendation is made to the relevant Secretary of State for decision making.

For further information, Advice Notes 8.1 - 8.5 have been sent via post to Ms Taylor.

12 April 2011
Taylor
Enquiry received via phone
How can I get involved with the promoters? (NG and SPEN) consultation on route corridors? What is the procedure for further involvement with the IPC? Who is the Examining Authority for such a project?
Advised Ms Taylor that in order to be engaged with the promoters? consultation on Route Corridors and other matters, liaison should be sought with both promoters: National Grid and SPEN. In doing so, your views can be taken into consideration at public consultation events which are currently being held up until the end of April 2011 in the local area ? further information on the location of such events can be sought from the promoter.

In order to become further involved and kept up-to-date of any procedural decisions on the project, the IPC website should be viewed regularly. Relevant information on the progress of the application can be sought here as well as important dates to register as an Interested Party. Alternatively, contacting the promoter directly will also be of benefit at this early stage and during later stages.

If an application is accepted by the IPC, an opportunity will be given to all persons to register as an interested party during the Pre-Examination stage. In registering as an interested party, you will both be able to submit initial, outline, representations of your support or objection to the proposed scheme and furthermore, you will have the opportunity to submit more detailed, written representations during the Examination stage. All interested parties will be kept up-to-date of any procedural decisions as well as having the opportunity to attend the preliminary meeting and any hearings, if they are held.

At present, the IPC are the examining body for Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects (NSIPs) and will make decisions on NSIPs where a National Policy Statement (NPS) has been designated by Government. If an NPS has not been designated, a recommendation is made to the relevant Secretary of State for decision making.

For further information, Advice Notes 8.1 ? 8.5 have been sent via post to Ms Taylor.

12 April 2011
Ms Taylor
Enquiry received via email
response has attachments
As the Chairman of HAG, Hub Action Group (Abermule), I am enquiring about the SoCC document, relating to Powys wind farm connections to the grid, which I understand should have been available before consultation started. Has a copy been lodged with you, we have enquired at all the normal places to no avail. If you have a copy could you forward one to us, if not could you advise on further action. National Grid are stalling at the moment.
It is our understanding that this project is currently conducting informal community consultation in Shropshire and Mid Wales. As such, at this stage, there is no requirement in the 2008 Planning Act ('the 2008 Act') for the Statement of Community Consultation (SOCC) to be made available. It is at the commencement of formal consultation under s.47 of the 2008 Act that requires that ?The applicant must prepare a statement setting out how the applicant proposes to consult, about the proposed application, people living in the vicinity of the land?. It is at this stage that the SOCC is published and made available to the public. It is for the applicant to decide when to commence formal consultation under s.47 of the 2008 Act. As such we do not have a copy of the SOCC document to forward to you.

The National Grid project team can be contacted on 0800 019 5325 or by email at national [email protected] There is also a project website; [attachment 1] .

At the point of submission of an application to the IPC, the applicant is required to submit a Consultation Report detailing the consultation it has undertaken and how it has had regard to the responses received. This can include consultation undertaken both formally under s.47, and informally. Further information on pre-application processes and the SOCC under the 2008 Act can be found in IPC advice note one, [attachment 2].

08 April 2011
Tony Caplin
Enquiry received via meeting
response has attachments
Initial meeting with National Grid as promoter for the construction of a new 400 kV electricity connection between Shropshire and Powys. The project was explained and the Planning Act (2008) process discussed.
[attachment 1]

16 February 2011
National Grid - Peter Bryant
Enquiry received via meeting
response has attachments
Joint meeting with National Grid, Scottish Power Energy Networks and the IPC to discuss three 132 kV overhead line connections, one in each of the following general areas : Sychton, Carno-Rhyd and Llanbadarn Fynydd and the Planning Act 2008 application process. The joint consultation between this project and that of National Grid's was also discussed.
[attachment 1]

08 February 2011
National Grid - Jacqui Fenn