M25 junction 10/A3 Wisley interchange improvement

The views expressed in this page do not represent those of the Planning Inspectorate. This page consists of content submitted to the Planning Inspectorate by the public and other interested parties, giving their views of this proposal.

M25 junction 10/A3 Wisley interchange improvement

Received 06 September 2019
From The Georgian Group

Representation

Dear Sir/Madam The Georgian Group has been made aware of the recent adjustments that Highways England has made to their scheme involving the A3 and Painshill Park Trust. Painshill Park is grade I statutorily listed, putting it amongst the most valuable landscapes in England. The park was designed and arranged by the Hon Charles Hamilton between 1738 and 1773. On the completion of the park in 1773, Hamilton was forced to sell Painshill, and what followed was a series of separate ownerships and a decline in the laid out vision of Charles Hamilton. This decline lead to the purchasing of the land after effective campaigning work by the Friends of Painshill, the Garden History Society and the Georgian Group. Following this important moment in the history of Painshill, the Painshill Park Trust was set up, tasked with the aim of returning the park to its former glory. A task that has been achieved to great success, helped by public and private grants, once again securing its national importance. The Georgian Group has been vocal, along with other parties, in the consultations surrounding the development of this project, culminating in Highways England previously making sensible and essential adjustments to the planned routes. Bearing this in mind, it is unfortunate to be made aware, that not all of these adjustments are to be taken forward in the official plans published by Highways England. The necessity of access onto the A3 at the west end of the park has been highlighted by the Painshill Park Trust and includes the safety of visitors to the grade I park, along with enabling vital restoration works to be carried out. The reasoning behind not ensuring that adequate access is supplied to the grounds, which was that ‘time had run out’ does not amount to ‘clear and convincing justification’. An aspect highlighted within the NPPF paragraph 194, where it states, ‘Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset, should require clear and convincing justification’. Going forward, the Group would like to see the amendments originally made by Highways England brought to fruition in their plans for Painshill Park and the surrounding area. Over the past year, the park has seen a 20% increase in visitors, which can be linked to the vital work undertaken by the Painshill Park Trust. Ensuring the necessary changes are made to the Highways England development would secure the future of one of the finest landscapes in England and allow further work to be undertaken on the grounds. Yours Sincerely, Edward Waller