The Sizewell C Project

The views expressed in this page do not represent those of the Planning Inspectorate. This page consists of content submitted to the Planning Inspectorate by the public and other interested parties, giving their views of this proposal.

The Sizewell C Project

Received 24 September 2020
From Christian Figg

Representation

This project must not go head as it would cause permanent damage and destruction to nationally and internationally designated landscapes, habitats and protected wildlife within an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The mitigation being offered is not adequate enough to compensate for the losses, and takes little account of the extent of the special needs of the rare species affected and unique landscapes. 1. Destruction of Shingle Beach and County Wildlife Site: Sizewell Beach is a variegated shingle beach - a rare and protected habitat and landscape feature. The beach would be completely dug up for new hard sea defences and a beach landing facility, destroying scarce flora and fauna. Proposals for the restoration of the shingle beach and dune system behind that are insufficient and unconvincing, and show little understanding or concern of the habitat. There is not enough evidence of a complete and total restoration of the habitat and landscape. 2. Coastal erosion and flooding: Climate change with rising sea levels of 4mm a year combined with more frequent and powerful storm surges, and the history of erosion and natural change of the Suffolk coastline, makes Sizewell an unsustainable and unsuitable location for further nuclear power stations and any long-term storage of nuclear waste. Even after the expected lifetime of Sizewell C/D in 60 years, the site will need to be protected from flooding and erosion for centuries more. This can not be guaranteed when long term climate change and sea level predictions beyond 2100 are taken into account. 3. Sizewell Marshes: A Site of Special Scientific Interest and cited ny Natural England as being 'of exceptional interest for their invertebrate fauna'. Yet there will be direct loss of this habitat and landscape as a result of building Sizewell C/D. EDFE's Aldhurst Farm habitat creation outside the AONB is not large enough and does not compensate for this loss, and in turn will be subject to extensive disturbance during the construction period. There will bill significant interruption to the hydrological dynamics of Sizewell Marshes, bringing fundamental changes to water flow and quality. This would have a major effect on the sensitive M22 fen meadow habitat, threating its SSSI status. 4. Division of the Aare of Outstanding Natural Beauty: The proposed construction area and new access road would divide the AONB in two forming a wildlife barrier between Minsmere / Walberswick RAMSAR, SPA, SAC SSSI and Sizewell Marshes SSSI. There would be a increase in direct mortality of birdlife of up to 30% due the new road, noise, lights, fumes and general disturbance. 5. Negative effect on Tourism: Tourism is the most important industry for the Suffolk coast. Tourists came to the location because of its undeveloped landscape, its tranquillity and solitude, low population, habitats and wildlife. EDFE's position that tourism will be largely unaffected by the construction of Sizewell C/D is unfounded, as the very things tourists, visitors and indeed residents come here for will be directly and negatively affected the project.