East Anglia TWO Offshore Windfarm

The views expressed in this page do not represent those of the Planning Inspectorate. This page consists of content submitted to the Planning Inspectorate by the public and other interested parties, giving their views of this proposal.

East Anglia TWO Offshore Windfarm

Received 22 January 2020
From Paul Chandler

Representation

I am writing to register my concerns relating to ScottishPower Renewables applications for East Anglia One North and East Anglia Two offshore windfarm projects. As a resident directly affected by these proposals, living at primary noise sensitive receptor site CCR4, these projects will directly impact upon the health and wellbeing and place a number of restrictions on our everyday lives for the 6 residential properties at this location. At no stage have SPR contacted any affected property owner to discuss mitigation measures or compensation for the additional increase in environmental noise, dust and light pollution. The baseline noise surveys are not representative of the current sound levels experienced in our garden at the rear of the properties, which is extremely quiet. The additional generated noise from the fields at the side and rear of our property is greatly underestimated. Should these projects be permitted, heavy traffic increase along Sizewell Gap Road (Heavy Route HR100) will be substantial. SPR plan to establish 2 haul roads either side of our property, and the cable trenches behind will effectively maroon us in a sea of noise and disruption. Further to this I am also very concerned about the following: 1. Traffic Impact. Apart from HR100, the local road network is typical of a rural location. Only Heavy Lorries will be obliged to use HR100 to access easternmost sites; access to the substation complex will be via the A1094 from the A12 towards Aldeburgh, turning onto the B1069 to Knodishall. There are a number of pinch points on these routes where HGVs passing local traffic, touring caravanners and motorhomes, as well as other HGVs is extremely restricted. All personal, LGV and other project associated traffic are free to choose routes to and from work sites, adding to local congestion. 2. Cumulative local impact on communities and inadequate local infrastructure of the multiple energy projects occurring together simultaneously during the life of these projects, as well as a number of new housing and utilities projects, and the day-to-day activities of local businesses. 3. Vibration, Noise, Light and Air pollution. The area is predominantly rural and abundant with wildlife and rare habitats. A number of rare and unique species will be disturbed and displaced. The health and wellbeing of residents will be affected. The peace and quiet is especially important to the Wardens Trust, a refuge for disabled children and adults, away from the noise and excess of modern city and town living. 4. Impact on Business and Tourism. Tourism is a vital economic contributor to the area, worth in excess of £200M/year. The Suffolk DMO has calculated losses of up to 20% per annum could result if these projects proceed and jeopardise many of the 4,500 people currently employed. 5. Destruction of valuable green spaces adjacent to the Suffolk Coast & Heaths AONB, SSSI, EPA & SPA. The famous open landscape scarred forever with massive warehouse size structures and electrical compounds, especially dwarfing the tiny village of Friston mentioned in the Doomsday Book. 6. Permanent and temporary closure of many PRoWs (footpaths, bridleways, byways and cycle paths) for the 4 – 8 year project duration. Used by many locals and visitors for a multitude of recreational pursuits