East Anglia ONE North Offshore Windfarm

The views expressed in this page do not represent those of the Planning Inspectorate. This page consists of content submitted to the Planning Inspectorate by the public and other interested parties, giving their views of this proposal.

East Anglia ONE North Offshore Windfarm

Received 23 January 2020
From Tessa Wojtczak

Representation

(I am a tenant at [Redacted]. The construction site for the proposed Landfall at Thorpeness is the distance of an occupied livery paddock away on our left. According to the Book of Reference available to the public, it appears that that paddock may also be needed for construction. To the rear is the sea. The cable trench and haul road route will pass directly in front of and to the right of us. It appears from recent maps and notes in the Book of Reference that the access track in front of us may be blocked by the trench work and haul road; also that changes are potentially being sought for the only other remaining access route to the properties at Ness House, dramatically reducing access to the buildings at this location. As a tenant, my interest is only in potential impact of all these factors surrounding us. This same access route is used by other households at this site, and Wardens, a charitable trust providing services for elderly and disabled individuals, and vulnerable children ). 1.Landfall site and cable corridor. Major and extended industrialisation of an AONB. Landfall site, Thorpeness. Site selection entirely inappropriate. Extreme fragility of cliffs and sandy lands adjacent. Recent death on Thorpeness beach caused by landslide from the sandy cliffs already extremely vulnerable to pressures of tide and wind. Risks of HDD. ( drilling) causing instability through vibration in the long term. Area subject to sand storms in dry periods, causing reduced visibility, will be exacerbated by works, affecting health and contamination to adjacent properties . A vital telecoms cable, Concerto, owned by a Dutch firm was recently uncovered at high tides, showing the vulnerability of the area. 24 hour light and noise pollution severely affecting adjacent properties, wildlife behaviour, migrating birds, tourism, leisure and businesses and the local quality of life. Large numbers of personnel, infrastructure and activity on a tranquil AONB will extend to a period of 8 years if projects 1 and 2 are developed consecutively. Probability of permanent and increasing industrialisation destroying the AONB and wider area for good if, as proposed, Nautilus and Eurolink projects follow SPRs footprint. Justification for such industrialisation of an AONB should be only in overwhelming national interest, or if there are no other sites available. Inappropriate siting appears to be down to National Grid, whose accountability is limited. 2. Open trench Cable Corridor and Haul Road. A motorway sized construction work with haul road causing lasting damage to the maturely wooded approach to Thorpeness. Replanting will not be possible. Nightingales, Buzzards, Owls, Sparrowhawks, Lapwing, numerous species of bat, field and skylark will lose habitat. Proposed increased use and adaptation of Sizewell Hall Road from Sizewell Gap Road to Landfall site, with high volumes of HGV , outsourced contractors, and, in parts, Abnormal Indivisible loads, will cause severe obstruction to local traffic that uses the by-way travelling along Sizewell Hall Road between Sizewell, Leiston, Aldringham, Thorpeness and Aldeburgh for work, visiting liveries and livestock, and day to day purposes. Development of this by- way from Sizewell Gap Road, as proposed to mitigate potential problems at Aldeburgh roundabout and accommodate increased traffic during construction, will destroy the peace of adjacent conservation sites and result in widespread closure and obstruction of the interconnected lanes, tracks and bridleways used daily by residents. There will be Interference with Sizewell B escape route, delay to emergency services, Sizewell armed police, postal workers, servicing and delivery vehicles, delivery of oil and gas to many properties, as in our case, not connected to mains. Extensive proposed extinguished or suspended rights to interconnected bridleways and lanes will no longer attract horse riders, cyclists or walkers, both local and visiting. Long existing rights and vital local access will disappear. Trench and cable corridor is at the narrowest point of a wildlife corridor used by herds of deer feeding, breeding, and accessing the salt and magnesium they need from local foliage, disrupting and damaging their potential to thrive. Local impact will be disastrous and longlasting. Local benefits have not been demonstrated.