East Anglia ONE North Offshore Windfarm

The views expressed in this page do not represent those of the Planning Inspectorate. This page consists of content submitted to the Planning Inspectorate by the public and other interested parties, giving their views of this proposal.

East Anglia ONE North Offshore Windfarm

Received 20 January 2020
From CofE Saxmundham Deanery

Representation

EAST ANGLIA 1 NORTH WINDFARM RELEVANT REPRESENTATIONS TO THE NATIONAL PLANNING INSPECTORATE BY REVEREND SHEILA HART RURAL DEAN ON BEHALF OF SAXMUNDHAM DEANERY JANUARY 2020 I fully endorse all that has been submitted by the Parochial Church Council of the Church of Saint Mary the Virgin, Friston. Accordingly, I also concur with the relevant representations made by: - Friston Parish Council supported by the SASES action group - Historic England - Suffolk County Council - East Suffolk Council - Other local interested parties opposed to the selection of Friston as the site for EA1(North), EA2 and National Grid substations. This development, however, has wider implications than merely for the Parish of Friston which has been the focal point of the relevant representations up to this point as they are the Parish which is most directly affected by the proposals of SPR. In the Church of England we work in Parishes, Benefices and Deaneries as subsections of Dioceses and the implications of this proposed development will not only have a direct impact on Friston Parish, but also on the three other Parishes of the Alde Sandlings Benefice (Redacted) which are under the pastoral charge of the same Rector. The proposed trenches for the cables bring the power from the windfarm to the proposed substation at Friston run within approximately 150 metres of each of the above-mentioned churches which are also Grade 11 and Grade 11* listed buildings with an historical significance and continuing growth and relevance to the communities in which they are set. During the construction process the disruption caused will significantly affect not only the peace and tranquillity of each of these churches and their congregations, but will also invade the areas of the surrounding countryside in which the majority of the congregations live, in some cases making it extremely difficult for the congregations to not only gather for worship, but support each other and work in collaboration and co-operation as a benefice. It will significantly hamper the ability of the Rector and the assistant Clergy to easily work across the benefice and fulfil the mission and ministry of the church. The proposed development, including the new roads that are envisaged to enable easier communication for the construction vehicles, would also have wider implications for the Deanery which is not merely a theoretical entity to ensure easy communication between the Diocese and the benefices at a local level, but also a vehicle for co-operative and collaborative working for the mission and ministry of the Church. In order to ensure this approach to mission and ministry is able to be effective, particularly among small rural churches which in and of themselves, may not have the numbers to sustain mission and ministry, but which, with the co-operation and collaboration of the wider Deanery can sustain growth and effective ministry, there needs to be the means whereby communication across the Deanery and access to the other benefices which make up the Deanery is maintained. There is a real possibility that this co-operation and collaboration in Mission and ministry will be significantly affected by the proposals for SPR – even to the extent that the Deanery will not be able to function in the way in which we are being encouraged to function as deaneries by the Diocese of Saint Edmundsbury and Ipswich and, indeed, the national Church. Reverend Sheila Hart Assistant Priest of Alde Sandlings Benefice Rural Dean of Saxmundham Deanery (Redacted) (Redacted)